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  1.  1
    Advancing Legal Preparedness Through the Global Health Security Agenda.Ana Ayala, Adam Brush, Shuen Chai, Jose Fernandez, Katherine Ginsbach, Katie Gottschalk, Sam Halabi, Divya Hosangadi, Dawn Mapatano, John Monahan, Carla Moretti, Mara Pillinger, Gabriela Silvana Ramirez & Emily Rosenfeld - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):200-203.
    The Global Health Security Agenda is a multilateral, multisectoral partnership comprised of more than 70 countries, international organizations, foundations, and businesses to strengthen global health security.
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  2.  2
    The Racialized Marketing of Unhealthy Foods and Beverages: Perspectives and Potential Remedies.Anne Barnhill, A. Susana Ramírez, Marice Ashe, Amanda Berhaupt-Glickstein, Nicholas Freudenberg, Sonya A. Grier, Karen E. Watson & Shiriki Kumanyika - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):52-59.
    We propose that marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages to Black and Latino consumers results from the intersection of a business model in which profits come primarily from marketing an unhealthy mix of products, standard targeted marketing strategies, and societal forces of structural racism, and contributes to health disparities.
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  3. Anti-Selection is Only the Beginning.Valarie K. Blake & Jessica L. Roberts - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):155-156.
    This commentary proposes the need for greater normative debate about when, if ever, it is appropriate for insurers to access genetic information of insureds to combat anti-selection.
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  4. Raqeeb, Haastrup, and Evans: Seeking Consistency Through a Distributive Justice-Based Approach to Limitation of Treatment in the Context of Dispute.James Cameron, Julian Savulescu & Dominic Wilkinson - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):169-180.
    When is life-sustaining treatment not in the best interests of a minimally conscious child? This is an extremely difficult question that incites seemingly intractable debate. And yet, it is the question courts in England and Wales have set out to answer in disputes about appropriate medical treatment for children.
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  5. Law Journals, Biomedical Journals, and Restraint of Trade.Gregory Curfman - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):195-199.
    Law journals permit submission of scholarly manuscripts to multiple journals concurrently, but biomedical journals strictly forbid submission of manuscripts to more than one journal at a time. Law journals may then compete for the publication of manuscripts. This article examines whether the single-submission requirement of biomedical journals may constitute restraint of trade in violation of Section 1 of the Sherman Antitrust Act.
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  6.  1
    Engaging Disability Rights Law to Address the Distinct Harms at the Intersection of Race and Disability for People with Substance Use Disorder.Kelly K. Dineen & Elizabeth Pendo - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):38-51.
    This article examines the unique disadvantages experienced by Black people and other people of color with substance use disorder in health care, and argues that an intersectional approach to enforcing disability rights laws offer an opportunity to ameliorate some of the harms of oppression to this population.
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  7.  1
    Consciousness, Conflations, and Disability Rights: Denials of Care for Children in the “Minimally Conscious State”.Joseph J. Fins - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):181-183.
    This essay critiques the fiercely utilitarian allocation scheme of Cameron et al. Children have no hope of recovery if their lives are cut short based on administrative protocols that misrepresent the nature of their conditions. Unilateral futility judgements - especially those based on a false predicate - are discriminatory. When considering the best interests of children, we should see possibility in disability and not advance ill-informed utilitarianism.
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  8. Anti-Selection & Genetic Testing in Insurance: An Interdisciplinary Perspective.Dexter Golinghorst, Aisling de Paor, Yann Joly, Angus S. Macdonald, Margaret Otlowski, Richard Peter & Anya E. R. Prince - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):139-154.
    Anti-selection occurs when information asymmetry exists between insurers and applicants. When an applicant knows they are at high risk of loss, but the insurer does not, the applicant may try to use this knowledge differential to secure insurance at a lower premium that does not match risk.
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  9. An Antiracist Health Equity Agenda for Education.Thalia González, Alexis Etow & Cesar De La Vega - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):31-37.
    With growing public health and health equity challenges brought to the forefront — following racialized health inequities resulting from COVID-19 and a national reckoning around the deaths of unarmed Black victims at the hands of police — an antiracist health equity agenda has emerged naming racism a public health crisis.
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  10. INTRODUCTION Health Law and Anti-Racism: Reckoning and Response.Michele Goodwin & Holly Fernandez Lynch - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):10-14.
    Law and racism are intertwined, with legal tools bearing the potential to serve as instruments of oppression or equity. This Special Issue explores this dual nature of health law, with attention to policing in the context of mental health, schools, and substance use disorders; industry and the environment in the context of food advertising, tobacco regulation, worker safety, and environmental racism; health care and research in the context of infant mortality, bias in medical applications of AI, and diverse inclusion in (...)
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  11. Reminiscences on Public Health Law and JLME.James G. Hodge - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):190-194.
    This contribution marks a dual milestone at the intersection of public health law and JLME: my 50th publication of a substantive manuscript in the 50th anniversary of the Journal in 2022. In recognition of these coinciding landmarks, this installment of the Public Health Law column for JLME features observations and reflections of the field based largely on prior publications.
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  12. FOREWORD The American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics and Anti-Racism.Ted Hutchinson - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):8-9.
    This foreword explores the history of the American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics and its role in promoting access to care and antiracism.
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  13. Letter From The Editor.Ted Hutchinson - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):1-1.
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  14. Harmony Between Man and His Environment: Reviewing the Trump Administration’s Changes to the National Environmental Policy Act in the Context of Environmental Racism.Gabrielle M. Kolencik - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):76-84.
    This article aims to show how the changes to NEPA by the Trump Administration are an act of environmental racism, defined as “[i]ntentional or unintentional racial discrimination in environmental policy‐making, enforcement of regulations and laws, and targeting of communities for the disposal of toxic waste and siting of polluting industries.”.
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  15.  2
    Mitigating Racial Bias in Machine Learning.Kristin M. Kostick-Quenet, I. Glenn Cohen, Sara Gerke, Bernard Lo, James Antaki, Faezah Movahedi, Hasna Njah, Lauren Schoen, Jerry E. Estep & J. S. Blumenthal-Barby - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):92-100.
    When applied in the health sector, AI-based applications raise not only ethical but legal and safety concerns, where algorithms trained on data from majority populations can generate less accurate or reliable results for minorities and other disadvantaged groups.
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  16. Applying Civil Rights Law to Clinical Research: Title VI’s Equal Access Mandate.Joseph Liss, David Peloquin, Mark Barnes & Barbara E. Bierer - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):101-108.
    Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and its implementing regulations prohibit federally-funded educational institutions and healthcare centers from engaging in disparate impact discrimination “on the ground of race, color, or national origin” in all of their operations.
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  17. “We Who Champion the Unborn”: Racial Poisons, Eugenics, and the Campaign for Prohibition.Paul A. Lombardo - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):124-138.
    Dr. Caleb Williams Saleeby was the author of Parenthood and Race Culture, one of the first monographs on eugenics and the book that popularized the term “racial poison.” The goal of eradicating the racial poisons and the harm they caused — particularly infant morbidity and mortality — provided common ground for early 20th century reformers, and their concerns fed the growing support for legal prohibition of alcohol.
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  18.  2
    Structural Discrimination in Pandemic Policy: Essential Protections for Essential Workers.Abigail E. Lowe, Kelly K. Dineen & Seema Mohapatra - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):67-75.
    An inordinate number of low wage workers in essential industries are Black, Hispanic, or Latino, immigrants or refugees — groups beset by centuries of discrimination and burdened with disproportionate but preventable harms during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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  19.  2
    Towards Racial Justice: The Role of Medical-Legal Partnerships.Medha D. Makhlouf - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):117-123.
    Medical-legal partnerships integrate knowledge and practices from law and health care in pursuit of health equity. However, the MLP movement has not reached its full potential to address racial health inequities, in part because its original framing was not explicitly race conscious.
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  20. New Preemption as a Tool of Structural Racism: Implications for Racial Health Inequities.Courtnee Melton-Fant - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):15-22.
    Preemption is a substantial threat to achieving racial equity. Since 2011, states have increasingly preempted local governments from enacting policies that can improve health and reduce racial inequities such as increasing minimum wage and requiring paid leave.
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  21. An Inter–Professional Antiracist Curriculum Is Paramount to Addressing Racial Health Inequities.L. Kate Mitchell, Maya K. Watson, Abigail Silva & Jessica L. Simpson - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):109-116.
    Legal, medical, and public health professionals have been complicit in creating and maintaining systems that drive health inequities. To ameliorate this, current and future leaders in law, medicine, and public health must learn about racism and its impact along the life course trajectory and how to engage in antiracist practice and health equity work.
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  22.  6
    Framing Black Infant and Maternal Mortality.Wangui Muigai - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):85-91.
    This article looks to the past to consider how government officials, health professionals, and legal authorities have historically framed racial disparities in birth and the lasting impact these explanations have had on Black birthing experiences and outcomes.
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  23. Attorneys as Healthcare Advocates: The Argument for Attorney-Prepared Advance Healthcare Directives.Grace W. Orsatti - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):157-168.
    Attorneys regularly prepare advance healthcare directives for their clients. However, attorneys, lacking medical knowledge, are often considered ill-equipped to prepare such documents. While recognizing and respecting the fact that advance healthcare directives pertain to decisions about medical care, this article proposes that attorneys who prepare advance healthcare directives nevertheless provide a valuable service.
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  24.  1
    Fresh Take: Pitfalls of the FDA’s Proposed Menthol Ban.Amirala Pasha & Richard Silbert - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):60-66.
    In April 2021, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced its intention to ban menthol flavoring in cigarettes and cigars. The Agency’s decision was based in part on the disproportionate impact of menthol flavoring in Black communities.
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  25. Physician Liability for Suicide After Negligent Tapering of Opioids.Mark A. Rothstein & Julia Irzyk - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):184-189.
    The precipitous and medically contraindicated reduction or “tapering” of opioids for patients with chronic pain due to serious medical conditions has caused needless suffering and, increasingly, suicide. Physicians could be liable for wrongful death based on negligent tapering of opioids.
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  26. Involuntary Commitment as “Carceral-Health Service”: From Healthcare-to-Prison Pipeline to a Public Health Abolition Praxis.Rafik Wahbi & Leo Beletsky - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (1):23-30.
    Involuntary commitment links the healthcare, public health, and legislative systems to act as a “carceral health-service.” While masquerading as more humane and medicalized, such coercive modalities nevertheless further reinforce the systems, structures, practices, and policies of structural oppression and white supremacy. We argue that due to involuntary commitment’s inextricable connection to the carceral system, and a longer history of violent social control, this legal framework cannot and must not be held out as a viable alternative to the criminal legal system (...)
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