29 found
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  1.  19
    Guest Editors’ Introduction: Gender, Business Ethics, and Corporate Social Responsibility: Assessing and Refocusing a Conversation.Kate Grosser, Jeremy Moon & Julie A. Nelson - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (4):541-567.
    ABSTRACT:This article reviews a conversation between business ethicists and feminist scholars begun in the early 1990s and traces the development of that conversation in relation to feminist theory. A bibliographic analysis of the business ethics and corporate social responsibility literatures over a twenty-five-year period elucidates the degree to which gender has been a salient concern, the methodologies adopted, and the ways in which gender has been analyzed. Identifying significant limitations to the incorporation of feminist theory in these literatures, we discuss (...)
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  2.  30
    The Power of Stereotyping and Confirmation Bias to Overwhelm Accurate Assessment: The Case of Economics, Gender, and Risk Aversion.Julie A. Nelson - 2014 - Journal of Economic Methodology 21 (3):211-231.
    Behavioral research has revealed how normal human cognitive processes can tend to lead us astray. But do these affect economic researchers, ourselves? This article explores the consequences of stereotyping and confirmation bias using a sample of published articles from the economics literature on gender and risk aversion. The results demonstrate that the supposedly ‘robust’ claim that ‘women are more risk averse than men’ is far less empirically supported than has been claimed. The questions of how these cognitive biases arise and (...)
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  3.  97
    Gender, Metaphor, and the Definition of Economics: Julie A. Nelson.Julie A. Nelson - 1992 - Economics and Philosophy 8 (1):103-125.
    Let me make it clear from the outset that my main point is not either of the following: one, that there should be more women economists and research on “women's issues”, or two, that women as a class do, or should do, economics in a manner different from men. My argument is different and has to do with trying to gain an understanding of how a certain way of thinking about gender and a certain way of thinking about economics have (...)
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  4. Feminist Philosophies of Love and Work.Julie A. Nelson & Paula England - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (2):1-18.
    : Can work be done for pay, and still be loving? While many feminists believe that marketization inevitably leads to a degradation of social connections, we suggest that markets are themselves forms of social organization, and that even relationships of unequal power can sometimes include mutual respect. We call for increased attention to specific causes of suffering, such as greed, poverty, and subordination. We conclude with a summary of contributions to this Special Issue.
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  5.  28
    Thinking About Gender.Julie A. Nelson - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (3):138-154.
    I present a way of thinking about gender that I have found helpful in evaluating various proposed feminist projects. By considering gender and value as independent dimensions, relationships of "difference" can be more clearly perceived as involving relationships of lack, of complementarity, or of perversion. I illustrate the use of my gender/value "compass" with applications to questions of self-identity, rationality, and knowledge. This way of thinking about gender allows a conceptualization of feminism that neither erases nor emphasizes gender distinctions.
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  6.  5
    Feminist Philosophies of Love and Work.Julie A. Nelson & Paula England - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (2):1-18.
    Can work be done for pay, and still be loving? While many feminists believe that marketization inevitably leads to a degradation of social connections, we suggest that markets are themselves forms of social organization, and that even relationships of unequal power can sometimes include mutual respect. We call for increased attention to specific causes of suffering, such as greed, poverty, and subordination. We conclude with a summary of contributions to this Special Issue.
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  7. Value as Relationality: Feminist, Pragmatist, and Process Thought Meet Economics.Julie A. Nelson - 2001 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (2):137-151.
  8.  78
    A Response to Bruni and Sugden: Julie A. Nelson.Julie A. Nelson - 2009 - Economics and Philosophy 25 (2):187-193.
    An article by Luigino Bruni and Robert Sugden published in this journal argues that market relations contain elements of what they call ‘fraternity’. This Response demonstrates that my own views on interpersonal relations and markets – which originated in the feminist analysis of caring labour – are far closer to Bruni and Sugden's than they acknowledge in their article, and goes on to discuss additional important dimensions of sociality that they neglect.
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  9.  94
    Economists, Value Judgments, and Climate Change: A View From Feminist Economics.Julie A. Nelson -
    A number of recent discussions about ethical issues in climate change, as engaged in by economists, have focused on the value of the parameter representing the rate of time preference within models of optimal growth. This essay examines many economists' antipathy to serious discussion of ethical matters, and suggests that the avoidance of questions of intergenerational equity is related to another set of value judgments concerning the quality and objectivity of economic practice. Using insights from feminist philosophy of science and (...)
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  10.  23
    Fearing Fear: Gender and Economic Discourse.Julie A. Nelson - 2015 - Mind and Society 14 (1):129-139.
    Economic discourse—or the lack of it—about fear is gendered on at least three fronts. First, while masculine-associated notions of reason and mind have historically been prioritized in mainstream economics, fear—along with other emotions and embodiment—has tended to be culturally associated with femininity. Research on cognitive “gender schema,” then, may at least partly explain the near absence of discussions of fear within economic research. Second, in the extremely rare cases where fear and emotion are alluded to within the contemporary economics literature (...)
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  11.  26
    Economic Methodology and Feminist Critiques.Julie A. Nelson - 2001 - Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (1):93-97.
  12.  93
    Survey Article: Feminism in the Dismal Science.Gabrielle Meagher & Julie A. Nelson - 2004 - Journal of Political Philosophy 12 (1):102–126.
  13.  2
    Review of an Advanced Introduction to Feminist Economics. [REVIEW]Julie A. Nelson - 2022 - Journal of Economic Methodology 29 (2):178-180.
    In fewer than 200 pages, Joyce P. Jacobsen, a long-time feminist economist and current President of Hobart and William Smith Colleges, skillfully summarizes feminist contributions to economics acro...
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  14.  10
    Economics and Community Knowledge-Making.Julie A. Nelson - 2021 - Journal of Economic Methodology 28 (1):107-113.
    Knowledge-making is a social activity. In this essay, I discuss how the economics discipline may be becoming a bit more cognizant of this fact, even though it goes against a long habit of imagining...
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  15. Clocks, Creation and Clarity: Insights on Ethics and Economics From a Feminist Perspective.Julie A. Nelson - 2004 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (4):381-398.
    This essay discusses the origins, biases, and effects on contemporary discussions of economics and ethics of the unexamined use of the metaphor an economy is a machine. Both neoliberal economics and many critiques of capitalist systems take this metaphor as their starting point. The belief that economies run according to universal laws of motion, however, is shown to be based on a variety of rationalist thinking that – while widely held – is inadequate for explaining lived human experience. Feminist scholarship (...)
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  16.  2
    Review of an Advanced Introduction to Feminist Economics. [REVIEW]Julie A. Nelson - forthcoming - Tandf: Journal of Economic Methodology:1-3.
  17. 9 How Did “the Moral” Get Split From “the Economic”?Julie A. Nelson - 2003 - In Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.), Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge. pp. 134.
     
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  18. Objective, Activist, and Postmodern?Julie A. Nelson - 2001 - In Stephen Cullenberg, Jack Amariglio & David F. Ruccio (eds.), Postmodernism, Economics and Knowledge. Routledge.
     
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  19. Postmodern?Julie A. Nelson - 2001 - In Stephen Cullenberg, Jack Amariglio & David F. Ruccio (eds.), Postmodernism, Economics and Knowledge. Routledge. pp. 286.
     
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  20.  45
    Ethics, Evidence and International Debt.Julie A. Nelson - 2009 - Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (2):175-189.
    The assumption that contracts are largely impersonal, rational, voluntary agreements drawn up between self-interested individual agents is a convenient fiction, necessary for analysis using conventional economic methods. Papers prepared for a recent conference on ethics and international debt were shaped by just such an assumption. The adequacy of this approach is, however, challenged by evidence about who is affected by international debt, how contracts are actually made and followed, the behavior of actors in financial markets, and the motivations of scholars (...)
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  21. A Picture of Gender.Julie A. Nelson - forthcoming - Hypatia.
     
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  22.  28
    Is EconomIcs a natural scIEncE?Julie A. Nelson - 2004 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 71 (2):211-222.
    Advocates of a more socially responsible discipline of economics often emphasize the purposive and unpredictable nature of human economic behavior, contrasting this to the presumably deterministic behavior of natural forces. This essay argues that such a distinction between “social” and “natural” sciences is in fact counterproductive, especially when issues of ecological sustainability are concerned. What is needed instead is a better notion of science—“science-with-wonder”—which grounds serious science in relational, non-Newtonian thinking.
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  23.  19
    Is Economics a Natural Science?Julie A. Nelson - 2005 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 1 (2):261-269.
    Advocates of a more socially responsible discipline of economics often emphasize the purposive and unpredictable nature of human economic behavior, contrasting this to the presumably deterministic behavior of natural forces. This essay argues that such a distinction between “social” and “natural” sciences is in fact counterproductive, especially when issues of ecological sustainability are concerned. What is needed instead is a better notion of science—“science-with-wonder”—which grounds serious science in relational, non-Newtonian thinking.
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  24.  22
    Economic Writing on the Pressing Problems of the Day: The Roles of Moral Intuition and Methodological Confusion.Julie A. Nelson - 2010 - Revue de Philosophie Économique 11 (2):37.
  25.  23
    Sociology, Economics, and Gender: Can Knowledge of the Past Contribute to a Better Future?Julie A. Nelson - unknown
    This essay explores the profoundly gendered nature of the split between the disciplines of economics and sociology which took place in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, emphasizing implications for the relatively new field of economic sociology. Drawing on historical documents and feminist studies of science, it investigates the gendered processes underlying the divergence of the disciplines in definition, method, and degree of engagement with social problems. Economic sociology has the potential to heal this disciplinary split, but only if (...)
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  26.  29
    More Thinking About Gender: Reply.Julie A. Nelson - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (1):199-205.
    Patricia Elliot distorts my work, in summarizing my position as one of advocating a revaluing of feminine qualities. After clarifying my position, I flesh out in greater detail my argument that complete gender neutrality is neither necessary nor sufficient for a non-sexist society. The argument focuses on gender as a cognitive category and on the crucial question of "how do we get there from here.".
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  27.  4
    Contemporary Schools of Economic Thought.Julie A. Nelson - 2008 - In Michel Weber (ed.), Handbook of Whiteheadian Process Thought. De Gruyter. pp. 119-126.
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  28.  2
    Conference Report Societas Ethica Annual Conference.Elisabeth Anderson Hansson & Julie A. Nelson - 2004 - Ethical Perspectives 11 (1):88.
  29.  4
    4. Gender and the 'Separative Self in Economics, Ethics, and Management.Julie A. Nelson - 2000 - In John Douglas Bishop (ed.), Ethics and Capitalism. University of Toronto Press. pp. 102-121.