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  1. added 2018-12-31
    Review of Neurofeminism: Issues at the Intersection of Feminist Theory and Cognitive Science. [REVIEW]Clifford van Ommen - 2014 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 34 (4):279-282.
  2. added 2018-12-17
    Epistemic Vices and Corruption in Science.Ian James Kidd - forthcoming - In Kristen Intemann & Sharon Crasnow (eds.), The Routledge Handbook to Feminist Philosophy of Science. New York: Routledge. pp. 00-00.
    I survey some points of contact between contemporary vice epistemology and feminist philosophy of science.
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  3. added 2018-12-15
    Interdisciplinary Foundations for the Science of Emotion: Unification Without Consilience.Cecilea Mun - forthcoming - Lanham, MD 20706, USA: Lexington Books.
    Part I, Fundamentals -/- Chapter 1, The Problem of Intentionality -/- Chapter 2, Original Intentionality -/- Chapter 3, The Intentionality of Emotions -/- Chapter 4, The Rationality of Emotions -/- Chapter 5, How Emotions Mean -/- Chapter 6, How Emotions Know -/- Part II, The Science of Emotion -/- Chapter 7, Meta-Semantic Realism about the Science of Emotion -/- Chapter 8, Semantic Dualism about Emotion.
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  4. added 2018-09-24
    Theory and Practice of Feminist Postcolonial Science Studies: Sandra Harding’s Is Science Multicultural? [REVIEW]David J. Stump - 2001 - Radical Philosophy Review 4 (1/2):263-265.
  5. added 2018-08-17
    Sex Inequality and Bias in Sex Differences Research.Alison M. Jaggar - 1987 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 17 (sup1):24-39.
    In this essay, I want to identify an invidious bias that is embedded in much research into sex differences. I shall argue that bias against women is endemic in any such research programme that fails to take account at every stage of women's social inequality. It is primarily because its view of the relation between sexual difference and sexual inequality is too simplistic that much sex differences research rationalizes and so perpetuates women's subordination.
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  6. added 2018-08-14
    Sexual Difference and Sexual Equality.Alison M. Jaggar - 1990 - In Deborah L. Rhode (ed.), Theoretical Perspectives on Sexual Difference. New Haven and London: Yale University Press.
  7. added 2018-08-14
    Conceptions of Sex Equality and Human Biology in Modem Political Theory.Alison M. Jaggar - 1988 - Philosophie Et Culture: Actes du XVIIe Congrès Mondial de Philosophie 5:62-69.
    The theme of human biology recurs continually both in feminist and in anti-ferminist literature. Reflection on human biology has seemed to promise answers to the urgent questions of why women everywhere are subordinated and whether and how that subordination can be ended. Invariably, anti-feminists have justified women's subordination in terms of perceived biological differences between the sexes, and feminists have responded to their claims in a variety of ways. In this paper, I want to look critically at the ways in (...)
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  8. added 2018-08-01
    Feminist Politics and Epistemology: The Standpoint of Women.Alison M. Jaggar - 2004 - In Sandra G. Harding (ed.), The Feminist Standpoint Theory Reader: Intellectual and Political Controversies. Routledge. pp. 55--66.
  9. added 2018-06-20
    Just Methods: An Interdisciplinary Reader.Alison M. Jaggar (ed.) - 2013 - Paradigm.
    The supplemented edition of this important reader includes a substantive new introduction by the author on the changing nature of feminist methodology. It takes into account the implications of a major new study included for this first time in this book on poverty and gender (in)equality, and it includes an article discussing the ways in which this study was conducted using the research methods put forward by the first edition. This article begins by explaining why a new and better poverty (...)
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  10. added 2018-06-05
    Overlapping Ontologies and Indigenous Knowledge. From Integration to Ontological Self-­Determination.David Ludwig - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 59:36-45.
    Current controversies about knowledge integration reflect conflicting ideas of what it means to “take Indigenous knowledge seriously”. While there is increased interest in integrating Indigenous and Western scientific knowledge in various disciplines such as anthropology and ethnobiology, integration projects are often accused of recognizing Indigenous knowledge only insofar as it is useful for Western scientists. The aim of this article is to use tools from philosophy of science to develop a model of both successful integration and integration failures. On the (...)
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  11. added 2018-04-24
    The Unreasonable Destructiveness of Political Correctness in Philosophy.Manuel Doria - 2017 - Philosophies 2 (3):17-0.
    I submit that epistemic progress in key areas of contemporary academic philosophy has been compromised by politically correct ideology. First, guided by an evolutionary account of ideology, results from social and cognitive psychology and formal philosophical methods, I expose evidence for political bias in contemporary Western academia and sketch a formalization for the contents of beliefs from the PC worldview taken to be of core importance, the theory of social oppression and the thesis of anthropological mental egalitarianism. Then, aided by (...)
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  12. added 2018-03-05
    Inductive Risk and Regulatory Toxicology: A Comment on de Melo-Martín and Intemann.Daniel Hicks - 2018 - Philosophy of Science 85 (1):164-174.
    Inmaculada de Melo-Martín and Kristen Intemann consider whether, from the perspective of the argument from inductive risk, ethical and political values might be logically, epistemically, pragmatically, or ethically necessary in the “core” of scientific reasoning. In each case, they argue that there are significant conceptual problems. In this comment, employing regulatory uses of high-throughput toxicology at the US Environmental Protection Agency as a case study, I respond to some of their claims about the notion of “pragmatic necessity.” I conclude that, (...)
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  13. added 2018-02-18
    Beyond the Boss and the Boys: Women and the Division of Labor in Drosophila Genetics in the United States, 1934–1970.Michael R. Dietrich & Brandi H. Tambasco - 2007 - Journal of the History of Biology 40 (3):509-528.
    The vast network of Drosophila geneticists spawned by Thomas Hunt Morgan's fly room in the early 20th century has justifiably received a significant amount of scholarly attention. However, most accounts of the history of Drosophila genetics focus heavily on the "boss and the boys," rather than the many other laboratory groups which also included large numbers of women. Using demographic information extracted from the Drosophila Information Service directories from 1934 to 1970, we offer a profile of the gendered division of (...)
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  14. added 2018-02-17
    Subjectivity and Emotion in Scientific Research.Jeff Kochan - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (3):354-362.
    A persistent puzzle for philosophers of science is the well-documented appeal made by scientists to their aesthetic emotions in the course of scientific research. Emotions are usually viewed as irremediably subjective, and thus of no epistemological interest. Yet, by denying an epistemic role for scientists’ emotional dispositions, philosophers find themselves in the awkward position of ignoring phenomena which scientists themselves often insist are of importance. This paper suggests a possible solution to this puzzle by challenging the wholesale identification of emotion (...)
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  15. added 2018-02-17
    Knowing (with) Others.Gaile Pohlhaus - 2006 - Social Philosophy Today 22:187-198.
    Feminist epistemologists and feminist philosophers of science have argued that our efforts to know the world are always situated, accompanied by such things as desires, beliefs, and interests that guide and shape what it is we discover and perhaps even what we can know. If this is the case, how is one to be receptive to that which is outside of the purview of one’s current understanding of the world? Some feminists have argued that in order to know more effectively (...)
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  16. added 2018-02-17
    Feminist Epistemologies.Linda Alcoff & Elizabeth Potter (eds.) - 1992 - Routledge.
    "First Published in 1992, Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.".
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  17. added 2018-02-17
    The Radical Future of Feminist Empiricism.Nancy Tuana - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (1):100-114.
    I argue that Nelson's feminist transformation of empiricism provides the basis of a dialogue across three currently competing feminist epistemologies: feminist empiricism, feminist standpoint theories, and postmodern feminism, a dialogue that will result in a dissolution of the apparent tensions between these epistemologies and provide an epistemology with the openness and fluidity needed to embrace the concerns of feminists.
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  18. added 2018-02-16
    Can Science Be Objective? Longino's Science as Social Knowledge.Sharon L. Crasnow - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (3):194-201.
    In Science as Social Knowledge, Helen Longino offers a contextual analysis of evidential relevance. She claims that this "contextual empiricism" reconciles the objectivity of science with the claim that science is socially constructed. I argue that while her account does offer key insights into the role that values play in science, her claim that science is nonetheless objective is problematic.
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  19. added 2018-02-05
    The Limits of Knowledge: Generating Pragmatist Feminist Cases for Situated Knowing by Nancy Arden McHugh, 2015 Albany, NY, State University of New York Press. Xii + 189 Pp, US$75 , US$75. [REVIEW]Trystan S. Goetze - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (3):344-346.
  20. added 2018-01-03
    Neutralité scientifique.Marc-Kevin Daoust - 2017 - Encyclopédie Philosophique.
    Un biologiste fait une découverte incompatible avec des conceptions religieuses de la vie bonne. En classe, un professeur d'université profite de son exposé magistral pour faire la promotion d'une idéologie politique. Un fonds de recherche des sciences sociales refuse de financer un projet visant à résoudre le problème de la sous-représentation des femmes en politique, affirmant qu'une telle recherche n'est pas scientifique. Tous ces exemples témoignent de l'interaction constante entre, d'une part, l'enseignement et la recherche scientifique, et d'autre part, les (...)
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  21. added 2018-01-03
    Black Feminist Archaeology.Whitney Battle-Baptiste - 2011 - Routledge.
    Black feminist thought has developed in various parts of the academy for over three decades, but has made only minor inroads into archaeological theory and practice. Whitney Battle-Baptiste outlines the basic tenets of Black feminist thought and research for archaeologists and shows how it can be used to improve contemporary historical archaeology. She demonstrates this using Andrew Jackson's Hermitage, the W. E. B. Du Bois Homesite in Massachusetts, and the Lucy Foster house in Andover, which represented the first archaeological excavation (...)
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  22. added 2017-10-29
    Current Controversies in Values and Science. [REVIEW]Vincenzo Politi - 2017 - Metapsychology Online Reviews 21 (42):xx-yy.
    Book Review of Current Controversies in Values and Science, Kevin C. Elliott and Daniel Steel (Editors), Routledge, 2017.
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  23. added 2017-06-18
    Socially Responsible Science and the Unity of Values.Miriam Solomon - 2012 - Perspectives on Science 20 (3):331-338.
  24. added 2017-05-15
    Amending and Defending Critical Contextual Empiricism.Kirstin Borgerson - 2011 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1 (3):435-449.
    In Science as Social Knowledge in 1990 and The Fate of Knowledge in 2002, Helen Longino develops an epistemological theory known as Critical Contextual Empiricism (CCE). Knowledge production, she argues, is an active, value-laden practice, evidence is context dependent and relies on background assumptions, and science is a social inquiry that, under certain conditions, produces social knowledge with contextual objectivity. While Longino’s work has been generally well-received, there have been a number of criticisms of CCE raised in the philosophical literature (...)
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  25. added 2017-04-25
    Multiplying Subjects and the Diffusion of Power.Helen E. Longino - 1991 - Journal of Philosophy 88 (11):666-674.
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  26. added 2017-03-27
    When Journal Editors Play Favorites.Remco Heesen - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (4):831-858.
    Should editors of scientific journals practice triple-anonymous reviewing? I consider two arguments in favor. The first says that insofar as editors’ decisions are affected by information they would not have had under triple-anonymous review, an injustice is committed against certain authors. I show that even well-meaning editors would commit this wrong and I endorse this argument. The second argument says that insofar as editors’ decisions are affected by information they would not have had under triple-anonymous review, it will negatively affect (...)
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  27. added 2017-03-16
    The Underrepresentation of Women in Prestigious Ethics Journals.Meena Krishnamurthy, Shen-yi Liao, Monique Deveaux & Maggie Dalecki - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (4):928-939.
    It has been widely reported that women are underrepresented in academic philosophy as faculty and students. This article investigates whether this representation may also occur in the domain of journal article publishing. Our study looked at whether women authors were underrepresented as authors in elite ethics journals — Ethics, Philosophy & Public Affairs, the Journal of Political Philosophy, and the Journal of Moral Philosophy — between 2004-2014, relative to the proportion of women employed in academic ethics (broadly construed). We found (...)
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  28. added 2017-01-25
    Logical Empiricism, Feminism, and Neurath's Auxiliary Motive.Robert B. Page, Bryce L. Munger & Richard M. Bergland - forthcoming - Hypatia.
  29. added 2017-01-18
    Mechanism, From the Standpoint of Physical Science.Lawrence J. Henderson - 1918 - Philosophical Review 27 (6):571-576.
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  30. added 2017-01-17
    Emotion and Ego From the Standpoint of Philosophy of Science.Hiroshi Saito - 1963 - Annals of the Japan Association for Philosophy of Science 2 (3):157-173.
  31. added 2017-01-15
    A Socially Relevant Philosophy of Science? Resources From Standpoint Theory's Controversiality.Sandra Harding - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1):25-47.
    Feminist standpoint theory remains highly controversial: it is widely advocated, used to guide research and justify its results, and yet is also vigorously denounced. This essay argues that three such sites of controversy reveal the value of engaging with standpoint theory as a way of reflecting on and debating some of the most anxiety-producing issues in contemporary Western intellectual and political life. Engaging with standpoint theory enables a socially relevant philosophy of science.
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  32. added 2016-12-12
    Płeć Kulturowa W Rozproszonych Systemach Poznawczych – Możliwości Konceptualizacji.Wachowski Witold - 2015 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 5 (1):135-150.
    Title - Gender in distributed cognitive systems: Possible conceptualizations. Abstract - There is a mismatch between social and biological approaches in the studies on sex and gender. Neurofeminist researchers critically examine gendered impacts of research in neuroscience and cognitive science, as well as develop more adequate and gender‑appropriate neuroscientific studies. However, they still seem to be focused on the brain and its relationship with the environment. Moreover, there are a little ‘science‑phobic’ feminist approaches based on actor‑network theory, and social science (...)
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  33. added 2016-12-12
    What We Mean by Experience.Marianne Janack - 2012 - Stanford University Press.
    Social scientists and scholars in the humanities all rely on first-person descriptions of experience to understand how subjects construct their worlds. The problem they always face is how to integrate first-person accounts with an impersonal stance. Over the course of the twentieth century, this problem was compounded as the concept of experience itself came under scrutiny. First hailed as a wellspring of knowledge and the weapon that would vanquish metaphysics and Cartesianism by pragmatists like Dewey and James, by the century's (...)
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  34. added 2016-12-12
    Uncovering Gynocentric Science.Ruth Ginzberg - 1987 - Hypatia 2 (3):89-105.
    Feminist philosophers of science have produced an exciting array of works in the last several years, from critiques of androcentrism in traditional science to theories about what might constitute feminist science. I suggest here another possibility: that gynocentric science has existed all along, then the task of identifying a feminist alternative to androcentric science should be a suitable candidate for empirical investigation. Such empirical investigation could provide a solid ground for further theorizing about feminist science at a time when that (...)
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  35. added 2016-12-08
    Feminist Resources for Biomedical Research: Lessons From the HPV Vaccines.Melo-martín Inmaculada de & Intemann Kristen - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (1):79 - 101.
    Several feminist philosophers of science have argued that social and political values are compatible with, and may even enhance, scientific objectivity. A variety of normative recommendations have emerged regarding how to identify, manage, and critically evaluate social values in science. In particular, several feminist theorists have argued that scientific communities ought to: 1) include researchers with diverse experiences, interests, and values, with equal opportunity and authority to scrutinize research; 2) investigate or "study up" scientific phenomena from the perspectives, interests, and (...)
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  36. added 2016-12-08
    Robert Boyle and the Masculine Methods of Science.Rose-Mary Sargent - 2002 - Philosophy of Science 71 (5):857-867.
    In her recent case study, Elizabeth Potter attempts to show how Boyle's experimental method was biased by gender considerations. Part of her argument focuses on the combination of the “invisibility” of women in Boyle's published work together with his unpublished comments on female chastity, and part concerns Boyle's rejection of the animistic explanation of his air pump experiments by Francis Line. I argue that the historical and biographical elements of the case make Potter's arguments questionable. In addition, I address whether (...)
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  37. added 2016-12-08
    Feminism and the Biological Construction of Female and Male Behavior.Van Den Wijngaard Marianne - 1994 - Journal of the History of Biology 27 (1):61-90.
  38. added 2016-12-08
    Science, Facts, and Feminism.Hubbard Ruth - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (1):5-17.
    Feminists acknowledge that making science is a social process and that scientific laws and the "facts" of science reflect the interests of the university-educated, economically privileged, predominantly white men who have produced them. We also recognize that knowledge about nature is created by an interplay between objectivity and subjectivity, but we often do not credit sufficiently the ways women's traditional activities in home, garden, and sickroom have contributed to understanding nature.
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  39. added 2016-12-05
    Book Review: Maralee Mayberry, Banu Subramaniam, and Lisa H. Weasel. Feminist Science Studies: A New Generation. New York: Routledge. 2001. [REVIEW]Petra Vriedes - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1):303-305.
  40. added 2016-11-17
    Thinking About Ecological Thinking.Lorraine Code - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (1):187-203.
  41. added 2016-11-17
    A Hasty Retreat From Evidence: The Recalcitrance of Relativism in Feminist Epistemology.Sharyn Clough - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (4):88-111.
    While feminist epistemologists have made important contributions to the deconstruction of the traditional representationalist model, some elements of the Cartesian legacy remain. For example, relativism continues to play a role in the underdetermination thesis used by Longino and Keller. Both argue that because scientific theories are underdetermined by evidence, theory choice must be relative to interpretive frameworks. Utilizing Davidson's philosophy of language, I offer a nonrepresentationalist alternative to suggest how relativism can be more fully avoided.
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  42. added 2016-10-15
    The Power of Weak Competitors: Women Scholars, “Popular Science,” and the Building of a Scientific Community in Italy, 1860s-1930s. [REVIEW]Paola Govoni - 2013 - Science in Context 26 (3):405-436.
  43. added 2016-10-02
    Whose Science? Whose Knowledge?Lorraine Code - 1994 - International Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):115-116.
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  44. added 2016-09-19
    Love Slaves and Wonder Women: Radical Feminism and Social Reform in the Psychology of William Moulton Marston.Matthew J. Brown - 2016 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 2 (1):1.
    In contemporary histories of psychology, William Moulton Marston is remembered for helping develop the lie detector test. He is better remembered in the history of popular culture for creating the comic book superhero Wonder Woman. In his time, however, he contributed to psychological research in deception, basic emotions, abnormal psychology, sexuality, and consciousness. He was also a radical feminist with connections to women's rights movements. Marston's work is an instructive case for philosophers of science on the relation between science and (...)
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  45. added 2016-09-18
    Revaluing Science: Starting From the Practices of Women.Nancy Tuana - 1996 - In Lynn Hankinson Nelson & Jack Nelson (eds.), Feminism, Science, and the Philosophy of Science. pp. 17--35.
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  46. added 2016-09-14
    Introduction: Special Issue on Feminist Science Studies.Lynn Hankinson Nelson & Alison Wylie - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1).
    Feminist analyses of science have grown dramatically in scope, diversity, and impact in the years since Nancy Tuana edited the two-volume issue of Hypatia on “Feminism and Science” (Fall 1987, Spring 1988). What had begun in the 1960s and 1970s as a “trickle of scholarship on feminism and science” had widened by the mid-1980s “into a continuous stream” (Rosser 1987, 5). Fifteen years later, the stream has become something of a torrent. The essays assembled for this special issue of Hypatia (...)
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  47. added 2016-09-12
    Defending Objectivity.Keith M. Parsons - 1999 - Philo 2 (1):77-89.
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  48. added 2016-09-11
    The Trouble With Numbers: Workplace Climate Issues in Archeology.Alison Wylie - 1994 - Archeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association 5 (1):65-71.
    My aim here is to focus attention on a shift, over the last decade, in how gender inequity in understood in North American academic settings, and to draw out some implications for the analysis of the status of women in archaeology.
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  49. added 2016-08-27
    Feminist Philosophy of Science.Alison Wylie - 1996 - In Encyclopedia of Philosophy Supplement. Macmillan. pp. 191-194.
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  50. added 2016-08-17
    Social Categories Are Natural Kinds, Not Objective Types (and Why It Matters Politically).Theodore Bach - 2016 - Journal of Social Ontology 2 (2):177-201.
    There is growing support for the view that social categories like men and women refer to “objective types” (Haslanger 2000, 2006, 2012; Alcoff 2005). An objective type is a similarity class for which the axis of similarity is an objective rather than nominal or fictional property. Such types are independently real and causally relevant, yet their unity does not derive from an essential property. Given this tandem of features, it is not surprising why empirically-minded researchers interested in fighting oppression and (...)
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