Search results for 'Amir Saemi' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Amir Saemi (2009). Intention and Permissibility. Ethical Perspectives 16 (1):81-101.score: 240.0
    There are two kinds of view in the literature concerning the relevance of intention to permissibility. While subjectivism assumes that an agent acts permissibly if he or she believes that the conduct is necessary for a moral purpose, for objectivism the de facto presence of an objective reason to justify one’s deeds is what matters. Recently, Scanlon and Hanser defend a moderate version of objectivism and subjectivism, respectively. Although I have a degree of sympathy toward both views, I will argue (...)
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  2. Amir Saemi (2014). The Guise of the Good and the Problem of Over-Intellectualism. Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (3):489-501.score: 240.0
    I will argue that Raz’s defense of the doctrine of the guise of the good rests on a over-intellectualized account of action. Raz holds that attributing evaluative beliefs to agents is justified on explanatory grounds. I argue that this account fails to do justice to the first-personal character of action explanation. Moreover, I will argue that Raz’s account of action has its root in his restrictive and over-intellectualized understanding of normative explanation. I will suggest that we can have a more (...)
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  3. Lydia B. Amir (2013). Lydia Amir. In Bresson Ladegaard Knox, Berg Olsen Friis & J. Kyrre (eds.), Philosophical Practice: 5 Questions. Automatic Press. 1-14.score: 180.0
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  4. Eva Gilboa-Schechtman, Lior Galili, Yair Sahar & Ofer Amir (2014). Being €Œin” or €Œout” of the Game: Subjective and Acoustic Reactions to Exclusion and Popularity in Social Anxiety. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 30.0
  5. Marcelo Dascal & Lydia Amir (1981). Inadequacies of Chisholm's Definitions of the Evident. Crítica 13 (37):69 - 76.score: 30.0
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  6. Lydia B. Amir (2013). Kierkegaard and the Traditions of the Comic in Philosophy. Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2013 (1).score: 30.0
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  7. Simon Shimshon Rubin & Danah Amir (2000). When Expertise and Ethics Diverge: Lay and Professional Evaluation of Psychotherapists in Israel. Ethics and Behavior 10 (4):375 – 391.score: 30.0
    Do psychotherapists' unethical practices influence how they are perceived? The 202 Israeli lay and professional psychology participants rated systematically varied descriptions of effective therapists and potential clients under conditions of no difficulties (standard), practice without a license, and a previous sexual boundary violation on indexes of evaluation and willingness to refer. Participants completed a measure of important variables in therapist selection. Effective standard therapists were rated most favorably, unlicensed therapists were rated favorably, and therapists who violated sexual boundaries in the (...)
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  8. Lydia B. Amir (2012). Humor in Philosophy: Theory and Practice. Philosophical Practice 7:1015-29.score: 30.0
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  9. Lydia B. Amir (2009). Rethinking Philosophers' Responsibility. In Jinfen Yan & David E. Schrader (eds.), Creating a Global Dialogue on Value Inquiry: Papers From the Xxii Congress of Philosophy (Rethinking Philosophy Today). Edwin Mellen Press. 19-29.score: 30.0
    Should philosophers address the needs of their societies? If the answer is affirmative, and if today's needs are being inadequately answered within the New Age movement for lack of viable alternatives, philosophers' minimal response could be teaching critical thinking outside the academe, and maximal response would be providing relevant wisdom for the world. The first option requires construing logic and epistemology as practical fields. The second requires reforming part of Philosophy as social thinking which provides relevant wisdom for the world. (...)
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  10. Lydia B. Amir (2005). Morality, Psychology, Philosophy. Philosophical Practice 1 (1):43-57.score: 30.0
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  11. Lydia B. Amir (2014). Shaftesbury—An Important Forgotten Indirect Source of Kierkegaard's Thought. Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 19 (1).score: 30.0
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  12. Eva Gilboa-Schechtman, Edna B. Foa & Nader Amir (1999). Attentional Biases for Facial Expressions in Social Phobia: The Face-in-the-Crowd Paradigm. Cognition and Emotion 13 (3):305-318.score: 30.0
  13. Erik Abrams, Lydia Amir, Seamus Carey, Reena Cheruvalath, Sara Ellenbogen, Michael Grosso, D. Floyd Keller, Jens Olesen, Bernard Roy & Naomi Thomas (2006). Philosophical Practice, Contributors Bios, Volume 2.2. Philosophical Practice 2 (2).score: 30.0
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  14. Lydia B. Amir (2013). A “Dangerous Idea” – Taking Seriously Thomas Magnell’s Moral Injunction to Direct Thought to Thought. Homo Oeconomicus 30 (4):475-479.score: 30.0
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  15. Lydia B. Amir (2014). A New Skeptical Worldview for Contemporary World Cultures. In Jian Chang (ed.), World Culture Development Forum 2013. Chian Social Sciences Academic Press. 337-363.score: 30.0
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  16. Lydia B. Amir (2001). Don’T Interrupt My Dialogue! In C. T. (ed.), Thinking through Dialogue. Practical Philosophy Press. 239-243.score: 30.0
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  17. Lydia B. Amir (2014). Doing Philosophy. [REVIEW] Philosophical Practice 9 (1):1397-1398.score: 30.0
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  18. Lydia B. Amir (2011). Epistemology as a Practical Activity. Haser 2:41-65.score: 30.0
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  19. Lydia B. Amir (2011). Humor – A Salvation from Salvations? Humor Mekuvvan: Scholarly Journal in Humor 1 (1):47-57.score: 30.0
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  20. Lydia B. Amir (2008). How Can Philosophy Benefit From Philosophical Practice? Practical Philosophy 9 (2):3-12.score: 30.0
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  21. Nader Amir, Emily Bower, Jeffrey Briks & Melinda Freshman (2003). Implicit Memory for Negative and Positive Social Information in Individuals with and Without Social Anxiety. Cognition and Emotion 17 (4):567-583.score: 30.0
  22. Lydia B. Amir (2013). Kierkegaard and the Philosophical Traditions of the Comic. Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook:377-401.score: 30.0
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  23. Lydia B. Amir (2013). Philosophy’s Attitude Towards the Comic. A Reevaluation. European Journal of Humor Research 1 (1):6-21.score: 30.0
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  24. Lydia B. Amir (2009). Philosophers, Ethics, and Emotions. Philosophical Practice 4 (2):447-458.score: 30.0
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  25. Lydia B. Amir (2002). Pride, Humiliation and Humility: Humor as a Virtue. Philosophical Practice 1 (3):1-22.score: 30.0
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  26. Lydia B. Amir (2003). Philosophical Practice: A Method and Some Cases. Practical Philosophy 6 (1):36-41.score: 30.0
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  27. Lydia B. Amir (2009). Que Podemos Aprender de la Filosofia Helenista? (What Can We Learn from Hellenistic Philosophy? Sophia: Revista de Filosofia 5:81-89.score: 30.0
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  28. L. B. Amir (2001). Rationality as Passion: Plato’s Theory of Love. Practical Philosophy 4 (3):6-14.score: 30.0
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  29. Lydia B. Amir (2012). Spinoza’s Ethics in Global Management. Journal of Global Studies 4 (1):123-138.score: 30.0
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  30. Lydia B. Amir (2006). Søren Kierkegaard and the Practice of Philosophy. In B. R. J. (ed.), Philosophers as Philosophical Practitioners. Ediciones. 31-45.score: 30.0
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  31. Lydia B. Amir (2004). The Affective Aspect of Wisdom: Some Conceptions of Love of Humanity and Their Use in Philosophical Practice. Practical Philosophy 7 (1):14-25.score: 30.0
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  32. Lydia B. Amir (2012). The Good Life Is the Good Laugh: The Comic in the History of Philosophy. In A. Ziv & A. Sover (eds.), The Importance of Not Being Earnest. Carmel Press. 206-253.score: 30.0
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  33. Lydia B. Amir (2014). The Individual. In S. Emmanuel, W. McDonald & J. Stewart (eds.), Kierkegaard’s Concepts, Tome IV: Individual to Novel. Ashgate.score: 30.0
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  34. Lydia B. Amir (2006). Taking Philosophy Seriously: Perfectionism Versus Meliorism. In B. R. J. (ed.), Philosophy and Practice. Grupo de Investigaciòn Universitario “Filosofía Aplicada: Sujeto, Sufrimiento y Socieded”. 11-32.score: 30.0
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  35. Lydia B. Amir (2004). Three Questionable Assumptions of Philosophical Counseling. International Journal of Philosophical Practice 2 (1):1-32.score: 30.0
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  36. L. B. Amir (forthcoming). The Role of Impersonal Love in Everyday Life. Philosophy.score: 30.0
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  37. Lydia B. Amir (2002). The Role of Impersonal Love in Everyday Life. In H. Herrestad, A. Holt & H. Svare (eds.), Philosophy in Society. Unipub. 217-242.score: 30.0
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  38. Lydia B. Amir (2011). The Role of the Teacher in Philosophers’ Self-Education. In G. T., P. T. & M. P. (eds.), Die Sprache der Freiheit. Philosophische Praxis und Kunst und Religion. LIT. 143-183.score: 30.0
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  39. Lydia B. Amir (2014). Taking the History of Philosophy on Humor and Laughter Seriously. Israeli Journal of Humor Research: An International Journal 5:43-87.score: 30.0
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  40. Lydia B. Amir (2006). The Unconscious: Freud Versus Sartre. In Peter Raabe (ed.), Philosophical Practice and the Unconscious. Trivium Publications. 23-78.score: 30.0
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  41. Lydia B. Amir (2010). The Value of Spinoza’s Ethics in a Changing World. Axiology and Ethics 1:301-320.score: 30.0
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  42. Lydia B. Amir (2014). The Value of Dissatisfaction – Maintaining the Tension That Unites Desires and Reason. Axiology and Ethics:46-57.score: 30.0
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  43. Lydia B. Amir (2010). When Did You Last Satirize a Mouse to Death? On the Magical Power of Humor. Kaveret 18:30-31.score: 30.0
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  44. Lydia B. Amir (2006). What’s It All About? A Guide to Life’s Basic Questions and Answers. [REVIEW] Philosophical Practice 2 (2):125-127.score: 30.0
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  45. Lydia B. Amir (2006). When Nietzsche Laughed: The Sanctification of Laughter in Nietzsche’s Thought. Metaphora 6:109-125.score: 30.0
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  46. Yariv Kanfi, Shoshana Naiman, Gail Amir, Victoria Peshti, Guy Zinman, Liat Nahum, Ziv Bar-Joseph & Haim Y. Cohen (2012). The Sirtuin SIRT6 Regulates Lifespan in Male Mice. In Jeffrey Kastner (ed.), Nature. Mit Press. 218-221.score: 30.0
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  47. H. Kotef & M. Amir (2011). Between Imaginary Lines: Violence and its Justifications at the Military Checkpoints in Occupied Palestine. Theory, Culture and Society 28 (1):55-80.score: 30.0
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  48. Henry L. I. Roediger & Nader Amir (2005). Implicit Memory Tasks: Retention Without Conscious Recollection. In Amy Wenzel & David C. Rubin (eds.), Cognitive Methods and Their Application to Clinical Research. American Psychological Association. 121-127.score: 30.0
  49. Iii Roediger, Henry L. & Nader Amir (2005). Implicit Memory Tasks: Retention Without Conscious Recollection. In Wenzel, Amy; Rubin, David C. (2005). Cognitive Methods and Their Application to Clinical Research. (Pp. 121-127). Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association. Ix, 289 Pp.score: 30.0
  50. Iii Roediger, Henry L. & Nader Amir (2005). Wenzel, Amy; Rubin, David C. (2005). Cognitive Methods and Their Application to Clinical Research. (Pp. 121-127). Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association. Ix, 289 Pp. [REVIEW]score: 30.0
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