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  1. John Abromeit, Mark W. Cobb, Lilian Alweiss, Susan J. Armstrong, Richard G. Botzler, Ronald Aronson, Robin Attfield, Gordon Baker, Katherine Morris & Etienne Balibar (unknown). The Following Books Have Been Received and Are Available for Review. Please Contact the Reviews Editor: Jim. Oshea@ Ucd. Ie. [REVIEW] International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (4):517 - 523.
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  2. Robin Attfield (forthcoming). Claims, Interests and Environmental Concern'. Ethics and the Environment. Oxford: Corpus Christi College.
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  3. Robin Attfield (2014). Popper and Xenophanes. Philosophy 89 (1):113-133.
    Karl Popper identified Xenophanes of Colophon (570–478 BCE) as the originator of the method of conjectures and refutations. This essay explores this claim, and the methods of both philosophers (section 1). Disparagement (ancient and modern) of Xenophanes has been misguided (section 2). Xenophanes, a critical rationalist and realist, pioneered philosophy of religion (section 3) and epistemology (section 4), but his method was not confined to falsificationism, and appears compatible with inductivism and abductionism (section 5). The method employed by Popper in (...)
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  4. Robin Attfield & Rebekah Humphreys (2013). Personhood, Ethics and Animal Cognition: Situating Animals in Hare's Two-Level Utilitarianism. By Varner. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2012, Pp. Xiv + 317. ISBN: 978-0199758784. [REVIEW] Philosophy 88 (3):493-498.
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  5. Robin Attfield (2012). Biocentrism and Artificial Life. Environmental Values 21 (1):83 - 94.
    Biocentrism maintains that all living creatures have moral standing, but need not claim that all have equal moral significance. This moral standing extends to organisms generated through human interventions, whether by conventional breeding, genetic engineering, or synthetic biology. Our responsibilities with regard to future generations seem relevant to non-human species as well as future human generations and their quality of life. Likewise the Precautionary Principle appears to raise objections to the generation of serious or irreversible changes to the quality of (...)
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  6. Robin Attfield, Ethics: An Overview.
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  7. Robin Attfield, Moral Standing, Saving the Planet and Meaningful Life.
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  8. Robin Attfield (2012). Required Reading. The Philosophers' Magazine 58:104-107.
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  9. Robin Attfield (2012). Synthetic Biology, Deontology and Synthetic Bioethics. Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (1):29 - 32.
    Paul Thompson argues that current synthetic biology amounts to synthetic genomics, comprising a ?platform? technology, and that Christopher Preston's deontological objections based on its supposed rejection of the historical process of evolution miscarry. This makes it surprising that Thompson's normative ethic consists in a deontological appeal to Kantian duties of imperfect obligation. Construed as obligations subject to choice, such constraints risk being excessively malleable where the ethical objections to deployment of this technology concern land rights and/or exploitation. Thompson's advocacy of (...)
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  10. John O'Neill, Clive L. Spash, Mark Whitehead, Robin Attfield, Bernard Baertschi, Seth D. Baum, Carol Booth, Peter F. Cannavò & Anna Deplazes-Zemp (2012). Index to Environmental Values Volume 21, 2012. Environmental Values 21:545-548.
     
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  11. Robin Attfield (2011). Beyond Anthropocentrism. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 69:29-46.
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  12. Robin Attfield (2011). 'Berkeley and Imagination'and'Against Incomparablism'(Vol 85, Pg 445, 2010). Philosophy 86 (335):149-149.
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  13. Robin Attfield (2011). Cultural Evolution, Sperber, Memes and Religion. Philosophical Inquiry 35 (3-4):36-55.
    Cultural transmission in non-literate societies (including that of Homer) is first discussed, partly to test some theories of Dan Sperber, and partly to consider thetheory of memes, which is sometimes held applicable to Homeric formulae, and is considered next. After discussing Sperber's criticism of memeticism, I turn toSperber's susceptibility theory of culture, and his discussions of religion and of music. Further examples drawn from Homeric religion are found to be in tension with aspects of this theory. Two diverse interpretations of (...)
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  14. Robin Attfield (2011). Darwin, Meaning and Value. Environmental Values 20 (3):309 - 314.
    In response to Alan Holland's 'Darwin and the meaning in life' (Environmental Values 18: 503—518) I argue that there can be room in a Darwinian world for talk of value, in the sense of interpersonal reasons to promote, preserve or cherish some of the states of that world, or to be glad about those states. Darwinian theorists can recognise a range of intrinsically valuable states of affairs, from the pleasure or the happiness of creatures to their flourishing, and need not (...)
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  15. Robin Attfield (2011). Nolt, Future Harm and Future Quality of Life. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (1):11-13.
  16. Robin Attfield (2011). Reflections on the Cancun Conference of 2010. Dilemata 6:47-51.
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  17. Robin Attfield (2011). Reflexiones Sobre la Conferencia de Cancún de 2010. Dilemata 6:47-51.
    Necesitamos urgentemente un acuerdo global y amplio sobre cambio climático que disponga sobre adecuación medioambiental, equidad y justicia tanto en lo relativo a la adaptación como a la mitigación. Sin embargo, los obstáculos para conseguirlo siguen siendo muy considerables y la satisfacción de dichos criterios éticos superó el ámbito de lo posible en la Conferencia de Cancún de 2010, incluso para quienes lucharon por ello. En estas circunstancias, no deja de ser impresionante tanto lo que se ha conseguido como la (...)
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  18. Robin Attfield (2011). Sober, Environmentalists, Species, and Ignorance. Environmental Ethics 33 (3):307-316.
    In an influential paper, Elliott Sober raises philosophical problems for environmentalism, and proposes a basis for being an environmentalist without discarding familiar, traditional ethical theories, a basis consisting in the aesthetic value of nature and natural entities. Two of his themes are problematic. One is his objection to arguments from the unknown value of endangered species, which he designates “the argument from ignorance,” but which should instead be understood as arguments from probability. The other concerns his attempt to avoid holistic (...)
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  19. Robin Attfield (2011). Schmidtz on Species Egalitarianism. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (2):139 - 141.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 14, Issue 2, Page 139-141, June 2011.
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  20. Isis Brook, Mark Whitehead, Katie Mcshane, Clive L. Spash, Robin Attfield, Daniel Baskind, Robert Heath French, Kerry Walker, John Cottingham & Alan Holland (2011). Index to Environmental Values Volume 20, 2011. Environmental Values 20:573-576.
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  21. Robin Attfield (2010). Darwin's Doubt, Non-Deterministic Darwinism and the Cognitive Science of Religion. Philosophy 85 (4):465-483.
    Alvin Plantinga, echoing a worry of Charles Darwin which he calls 'Darwin's doubt', argues that given Darwinian evolutionary theory our beliefs are unreliable, since they are determined to be what they are by evolutionary pressures and could have had no other content. This papers surveys in turn deterministic and non-deterministic interpretations of Darwinism, and concludes that Plantinga's argument poses a problem for the former alone and not for the latter. Some parallel problems arise for the Cognitive Science of Religion, and (...)
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  22. Robin Attfield (2010). Ecological Issues of Justice. Journal of Global Ethics 5 (2):147-154.
    In the first part of this article the author explores the implications for justice of the wider range of parties holding moral standing that environmental ethics has recently disclosed. These implications concern the equitable treatment of future generations and nonhuman creatures, and are relevant both to policies, such as approaches to global warming, and procedures, which may need to be revised to give an equitable voice to unrepresented interests. Later the author considers some radical implications of regarding humanity as stewards (...)
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  23. Robin Attfield (2010). Saving Creation. Environmental Ethics 32 (4):417-420.
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  24. Robin Attfield (2009). Mediated Responsibilities, Global Warming, and the Scope of Ethics. Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (2):225-236.
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  25. Robin Attfield (2009). Non-Reciprocal Responsibilities and the Banquet of the Kingdom. Journal of Global Ethics 5 (1):33 – 42.
    Granted the far-flung impacts of humanity on the future and the biosphere, Hans Jonas has rightly called for our responsibilities to be reconceptualised, and where responsibilities are non-reciprocal Chris Groves has put forward a model of the ethics of care to underpin them. In view, however, of Derek Parfit's work on responsibilities with regard to the possible but unidentifiable people of alternative possible futures, the author suggests that an ethical model grounded in relations, while helpful, is insufficient with regard to (...)
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  26. Robin Attfield (2009). Philosophy on Poetry, Philosophy in Poetry. In Jinfen Yan & David E. Schrader (eds.), Creating a Global Dialogue on Value Inquiry: Papers From the Xxii Congress of Philosophy (Rethinking Philosophy Today). Edwin Mellen Press. 13-19.
    The relations of philosophy and poetry include but are not exhausted by Plato’s hostility to mimetic poetry in the Republic and Aristotle’s defence of it in the Poetics. For poetry has often carried a philosophical message itself, from the work of Chaucer and Milton to that of T.S. Eliot. In yet earlier generations, poetry was chosen as the medium for conveying a philosophical message by (among Greek philosophers) Xenophanes, Parmenides and Empedocles, and (at Rome) by Lucretius, who struggled both with (...)
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  27. Robin Attfield (2009). Reviews What is Biodiversity by James Maclaurin and Kim Sterelny University of Chicago Press, 2008. £31/£12.50. Philosophy 84 (4):605-609.
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  28. Robin Attfield (2009). Social History, Religion, and Technology. Environmental Ethics 31 (1):31-50.
    An interdisciplinary reappraisal of Lynn White, Jr.’s “The Historical Roots of Our Ecologic Crisis” reopens several issues, including the suggestion by Peter Harrison that White’s thesis was historical and that it is a mistake to regard it as theological. It also facilitates a comparison between “Roots” and White’s earlier book Medieval Technology and Social Change. In “Roots,” White discarded or de-emphasized numerous qualifications and nuances present in his earlier work so as to heighten the effect of certain rhetorical aphorisms and (...)
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  29. Robin Attfield (2008). Creation and Evolution. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:41-47.
    It is not inconsistent to believe in both creation and in Darwinian evolution at the same time as rejecting creationism, and endorsing a realist stance about religious and scientific language. Belief in creation is argued to be every bit as defensible as Darwinism, and reconcilable with phenomena such as predation. If (as Richard Dawkins holds) evolution is the only possible pathway to life as we know it, then a life-loving creator would select this pathway. If it is not the only (...)
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  30. Robin Attfield (2008). Global Warming, Equity and Future Generations. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 23:5-11.
    The phenomenon of global warming, the anthropogenic theory of its genesis and some of the implications of that theory are introduced as a case-study of a global environmental problem involving issues of equity between peoples, generations and species. We should favour the proportioning of emission quotas topopulation, if the charges of anthropocentrism and of discrimination against future generations can be avoided. It is argued that these charges can be replied to satisfactorily, if emissions totals are set low enough for the (...)
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  31. Robin Attfield (2007). Beyond the Earth Charter. Environmental Ethics 29 (4):359-367.
    The Earth Charter is largely a wholesome embodiment of a commendable and globally applicable ecological ethic. But it fails to treat responsibilities towardfuture generations with sufficient clarity, presenting these generations as comparable to present and past generations, whose members are identifiable, whenin fact most future people are of unknown identity, and when the very existence of most of them depends on current actions. It can be claimed that we still haveobligations with regard to whoever there will be whom we could (...)
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  32. Robin Attfield (2007). Is the Concept of Nature Dispensable? The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 5 (25):59-63.
    In response to the arguments of Bill McKibben and of Stephen Vogel that nature is at an end and that the very concept of nature should be discarded, I argue that, far from this being the case, the concept of nature is indispensable. A third sense of 'nature' besides the two distinguished by Vogel, that of the nature of an organism, is brought to attention and shown, through five arguments, to be indispensable for environmental philosophy and ethics, and for ethics (...)
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  33. Robin Attfield (2007). Sustainable Development Revisited. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:185-189.
    My aim is to defend the concept of sustainable development both against economists' interpretations that make it involve perpetual gains to human well-being, and against sceptical accounts that make its meaning vary from speaker to speaker, serving as a cloak for the status quo and the suggestion that it be discarded. The assumptions of the economists' interpretation are questioned, and the centrality among early advocates of sustainable development of sustainable practices and of sustainability being social and ecological as well as (...)
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  34. Robin Attfield, Creation, Evolution and Meaning.
    This book presents the case for belief in both creation and evolution at the same time as rejecting creationism. Issues of meaning supply the context of inquiry; the book defends the meaningfulness of language about God, and also relates belief in both creation and evolution to the meaning of life. Meaning, it claims, can be found in consciously adopting the role of steward of the planetary biosphere, and thus of the fruits of creation. Distinctive features include a sustained case for (...)
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  35. Robin Attfield (2006). The Shape of a Global Ethic. Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 (1):5-19.
    A global ethic needs to be cosmopolitan in a sense which is explained; this excludes certain kinds of communitarian ethic. Contracttheories, Kantianism, basic-rights theories, Ross-type deontology and theories of virtue ethics are reviewed and found to encounter severe problems. Consequentialist theories, however, are found capable of coping with Williams’ objections, and practice-consequentialist theories capable of coping with right-making practices and with Lenman's unpredictability objection. Variants that exclude from consideration unintended consequences, the results of omissions, or impacts on possible people, or (...)
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  36. Robin Attfield (2005). An Introduction to Global Citizenship. Philosophy of Management 5 (3):126-127.
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  37. Robin Attfield (2005). Biocentric Consequentialism and Value-Pluralism: A Response to Alan Carter. Utilitas 17 (1):85-92.
    My theory of biocentric consequentialism is first shown not to be significantly inegalitarian, despite not advocating treating all creatures equally. I then respond to Carter's objections concerning population, species extinctions, the supposed minimax implication, endangered interests, autonomy and thought-experiments. Biocentric consequentialism is capable of supporting a sustainable human population at a level compatible with preserving most non-human species, as opposed to catastrophic population increases or catastrophic decimation. Nor is it undermined by the mere conceivable possibility of counter-intuitive implications. While Carter (...)
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  38. Robin Attfield (2005). Generaciones futuras: Considerando todas las partes afectadas. Isegoría 32:35-46.
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  39. Robin Attfield (2005). In Defense of Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 27 (3):335-336.
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  40. Robin Attfield (2005). Leibniz, the Cause of Gravity and Physical Theology. Studia Leibnitiana 37 (2):238 - 244.
    Im vierten Brief an Clarke behauptet Leibniz, dass Newtons Vorstellung von der Gravitation okkulte Kräfte in die Physik einführe und so ins Übernatürliche münde. Clarke wies diese Behauptung zurück und stellte in seiner fünften Antwort die gleichsam offizielle, positivistische Haltung Newtons heraus. Gleichwohl glaubten Newton und Clarke wahrscheinlich an eine der ihnen durch Leibniz zugeschriebenen durchaus vergleichbare Theorie: dass nämlich dem sonst mysteriösen Phänomen der Fernwirkung Gottes Allgegenwart zugrunde liege. Erst im Jahre 1717, nach Leibniz' Tod, verwarf Newton diese Position. (...)
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  41. Robin Attfield (2005). Unprojected Value, Unfathomed Caves and Unspent Nature: Reply to an Editorial. Environmental Values 14 (4):513 - 518.
    This article replies to Alan Holland's challenge to reconcile belief in non-anthropogenic intrinsic value with the poetry of John Clare and its projection onto nature of human feelings, and thus with projective humanism. However, in literature and broadcasts, feelings are found projected upon buildings and belongings as well as upon natural creatures. This and the fact that many living creatures (such as the Northamptonshire species not remarked by Clare) never become objects of human projections but still remain valuable suggests that (...)
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  42. Robin Attfield (2004). Differentiated Responsibilities. In Markku Oksanen & Juhani Pietarinen (eds.), Philosophy and Biodiversity. Cambridge University Press. 237.
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  43. Robin Attfield (2004). Rousseau, Clarke, Butler and Critiques of Deism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (3):429 – 443.
    Rousseau’s stance on natural religion, revealed religion and their relation are outlined (section 1), and then his agreements and disagreements with Samuel Clarke (section 2). After a survey of Joseph Butler's critique of deism (section 3), Rousseau’s arguments emerge as capable of supplying a counter-critique sufficient to show that deism could claim to have survived the eighteenth-century undefeated (section 4). If the attempted refutation of theistic arguments on the parts of David Hume and of Immanuel Kant was inconclusive (section 5), (...)
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  44. Robin Attfield (2003). Environmental Ethics: An Overview for the Twenty-First Century. Polity.
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  45. Robin Attfield (2003). Global Warming, Justice and Future Generations. Philosophy of Management 3 (1):17-23.
    The phenomenon of global warming, the anthropogenic theory of its genesis and some of the implications of that theory are introduced as a case-study of a global environmental problem involving issues of equity between peoples, generations and species. In particular, recognition of the view that the absorptive capacities of the atmosphere comprise an instance of the Common Heritage of Humankind would have a key bearing on negotiations downstream from the Kyoto Protocol, suggesting the proportioning of emission quotas to population, and (...)
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  46. Robin Attfield (2003). Mind3 of My Book The Ethics of the Global Environment (EGE). 4. Utilitas 15 (1).
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  47. Robin Attfield (2003). Biocentric Consequentialism, Pluralism, and 'The Minimax Implication': A Reply to Alan Carter. Utilitas 15 (01):76-.
    Alan Carter's recent review in Mind of my Ethics of the Global Environment combines praise of biocentric consequentialism (as presented there and in Value, Obligation and Meta-Ethics) with criticisms that it could advocate both minimal satisfaction of human needs and the extinction of for the sake of generating extra people; Carter also maintains that as a monistic theory it is predictably inadequate to cover the full range of ethical issues, since only a pluralistic theory has this capacity. In this reply, (...)
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  48. Robin Attfield (2001). Are Promises to Repay International Debt Binding? Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (4):505–511.
  49. Robin Attfield (2001). Genes, Genesis and God by Holmes Rolston III. Philosophy of Management 1 (1):75-77.
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