This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
155 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 155
  1. Keith Acheson (2000). Disciplined Stories in the Governance of the New Institutional Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 7 (3):341-371.
    The New Institutional Economics (NIE) occupies an important space in the rapidly expanding theory of organization. Traditional testing techniques have only been applied to less complex parts of the NIE. A rich body of evidence generated by the experiences of firms and other organizations lies fallow. The limited domain of traditional testing will persist because of the nature of the central concepts of the NIE, the difficulty posed for integrating transaction cost into an optimizing framework by self-reference, and the particularly (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jonathan H. Adler (2012). Is the Common Law a Free-Market Solution to Pollution? Critical Review 24 (1):61-85.
    Whereas conventional analyses characterize environmental problems as examples of market failure, proponents of free-market environmentalism (FME) consider the problem to be a lack of markets and, in particular, a lack of enforceable and exchangeable property rights. Enforcing property rights alleviates disputes about, as well as the overuse of, most natural resources. FME diagnoses of pollution are much weaker, however. Most FME proponents suggest that common-law tort suits can adequately protect private property and ecological resources from pollution. Yet such claims have (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. John Aldrich (2006). When Are Inferences Too Fragile to Be Believed? Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (2):161-177.
    The use of sensitivity analysis is routine in some fields of empirical econometrics, although econometric theorists have generally taken a critical attitude towards it. This paper presents a framework in which arguments for and against such analysis can be evaluated. It appears that sensitivity is not necessarily a bad, nor sturdiness necessarily a good.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Richard G. Anderson, William H. Greene, Bruce D. McCullough & Hrishikesh D. Vinod (2008). The Role of Data/Code Archives in the Future of Economic Research. Journal of Economic Methodology 15 (1):99-119.
  5. Dominick T. Armentano (1992). Anti‐Antitrust: Ideology or Economics? Reply to Scherer. Critical Review 6 (1):29-39.
    F.M. Scherer has not effectively rebutted my subjectivist criticism of the standard microeconomic welfare model; Scherer's historical reference to what Congress (allegedly) believed is irrelevant to the theoretical concerns raised by subjectivism. Nor does my ?principal? criticism of antitrust policy rests on ?philosophical foundations?; my principal criticism rests on conventional economic analysis and a detailed economic history of the classic antitrust cases. My conclusion that the electrical equipment conspiracy of the late 1950s had no significant effect on market prices is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. N. Scott Arnold (1988). Reply to Professor Putterman. Economics and Philosophy 4 (02):337-.
  7. N. Scott Arnold (1987). Final Reply to Professor Schweickart. Economics and Philosophy 3 (02):335-.
  8. N. Scott Arnold (1987). Further Thoughts on the Degeneration of Market Socialism: A Reply to Schweickart. Economics and Philosophy 3 (02):320-.
  9. Daniel Attas & Avner de-Shalit (2004). Workfare: The Subjection of Labour. Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (3):309-320.
    When viewed as a question of distributive justice the evaluation of workfare typically reflects exclusively on the distribution of income: do the physically capable have a justified claim for state support, or is it fair to demand from those who do work to subsidise this support? Rarely is workfare appraised in terms of how it affects other parties such as employers or other workers, and on the structural effects the pattern of incentives it generates brings about, or as an issue (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Robin Attfield (1984). Work and the Human Essence. Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (1):141-150.
    Jenkins and Sherman hold that belief in the value of work is artificially inculcated and that a ‘leisure society’ is desirable and possible, as well as being necessitated by the introduction of microprocessors. After distinguishing between meaningful work and labour (first section), I reply obliquely to their case by contending that meaningful work affords most people their best chance of the necessary good of self-respect (second section), and that it constitutes the exercise of an essential human capacity, the development of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Siobhan Austen & Therese Jefferson (2006). Comparing Responses to Critical Realism. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (2):257-282.
    This article is a study of the response of two heterodox schools of economic thought to ?new? philosophical ideas. Specifically, it considers the response within Post Keynesian and feminist economics to Tony Lawson's recent call for economists to pay greater attention to ontology and for economists to adopt research methods consistent with critical realism. Lawson's arguments were formally introduced to these schools over the space of a few years and continue to generate considerable discussion within their ranks. The focus of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Roger E. Backhouse (2011). New Directions in Economics and the Philosophy of Economics? The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (3):305-311.
  13. Roger E. Backhouse (1996). Economics and the Antagonism of Time: Time, Uncertainty and Choice in Economic Theory, Douglas Vickers. University of Michigan Press, 1994, X + 272 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 12 (01):119-.
  14. Andy Bahn & John Gowdy (2003). Economics Weak and Strong: Ecological Economics and Human Survival. World Futures 59 (3 & 4):253 – 262.
    Mounting evidence suggests that the human impact on the planet is reaching the point where the Earth's ecosystems will not be able to support the level of human occupation. The global economy also seems to be generating income disparities that threaten the social stability of even the most developed economies. Although both these trends are rooted in the operation of the global market economy, standard economics has surprisingly little to offer in the way of policies that might allow us to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. D. Baker (1994). Review of James A. Caporaso and David P. Levine's Theories of Political Economy. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 10 (02):354-354.
  16. Matthieu Ballandonne (2012). New Economics of Science, Economics of Scientific Knowledge and Sociology of Science: The Case of Paul David. Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (4):391-406.
    For a little more than twenty years, the terminology used in the economics of science has changed significantly with the development of expressions such as ?new economics of science? (NES) and ?economics of scientific knowledge? (ESK). This article seeks to shed light on the use of these different terminologies by studying the work of the economist of science Paul David. We aim to use his work as a case study in order to argue for a difference between NES and ESK (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Nicholas Bardsley (2007). Teamwork: Multi-Disciplinary Perspectives, Edited by Natalie Gold. Palgrave Macmillan, 2005, XXVI+253 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 23 (2):237-240.
  18. Thomas Basbøll (2006). Reflexivity in Perspective: A Note on Davis and Klaes' Reading ofLas Meninas. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (1):113-119.
  19. Michael Benedikt (1996). Complexity, Value, and the Psychological Postulates of Economics. Critical Review 10 (4):551-594.
    Abstract Does the contemporary built environment?the ensemble of our humanly created surroundings?make us happy? This question prompts a consideration of the psychological dimensions of economic value, and of Tibor Scitovsky's revisions of standard economic theory. With Scitovsky as a starting point, a model of value based on modern complexity theory and a Maslow?like rendition of human needs can account for some of the more important exceptions to the law of diminished marginal utility, including those that may undermine the built environment (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jeremy Bentham & Dan Usher (1999). Why'law and Economics'is Not the Frankenstein Monster. Economics and Philosophy 15:249-267.
  21. Lawrence A. Berger (1989). Economics and Hermeneutics. Economics and Philosophy 5 (02):209-.
  22. Ana Maria Bianchi & Cleofas Salviano (1999). Raúl Prebisch and the Beginnings of the Latin American School of Economics: A Rhetorical Perspective. Journal of Economic Methodology 6 (3):423-438.
    Fifty years ago, the Argentinean economist Raúl Prebisch published a paper called Estúdio Económico de América Latina. The Estúdio was one of the first texts that set up what was later termed the ?Prebisch-Singer thesis? or, more widely, the Latin American School of Economics. According to this document, Latin American countries should undergo an industrialization program under the direct supervision of the national state. The rationale for this thesis was the deterioration of the terms of trade for countries exporting primary (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Stephan Boehm & Karl Farmer (1993). Why the Acrimony? Reply to Davidson. Critical Review 7 (2-3):407-421.
    Our response to Davidson is two?pronged. First, we dispute the basis for his dismissal of Austrian economics as presented by O'Driscoll and Rizzo. In particular, we reject his claim, dictated entirely by his Post Keynesian perspective, concerning an ?identical axiomatic foundation? of Austrian and neoclassical economics. Second, we seek to show that Davidson's criticism of neoclassicism (and by implication of Austrianism) is based on a superficial, incorrect, and outmoded reading of neoclassical economics.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Peter J. Boettke (2004). Obituary. Don Lavoie (1950–2001). Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (3):377-379.
  25. Peter J. Boettke (1990). Individuals and Institutions. Critical Review 4 (1-2):10-26.
    ECONOMICS AND INSTITUTIONS: A MANIFESTO FOR MODERN INSTITUTIONAL ECONOMICS by Geoffrey Hodgson Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1988. 365pp., $39.95 Traditional institutional economics argued that the methodological individualism of both classical and neoclassical economics was grounded in a false conception of human nature and a pre?scientific understanding of economic life. Geoffrey Hodgson has provided a restatement of this position and extended the institutionalist critique to modern developments within economics at both a positive and normative level. In the course of doing (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. David Boonin (1988). Competition and Capitalism. Critical Review 2 (2-3):183-188.
    NO CONTEST: THE CASE AGAINST COMPETITION by Alfie Kohn Boston: Houghton Miffin, 1986. 257 pp., $16.95.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Bryan L. Boulier & Robert S. Goldfarb (1998). On the Use and Nonuse of Surveys in Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 5 (1):1-21.
    While it is widely alleged that economists do not like or use questionnaire surveys, the facts are considerably more complicated. Economists make extensive use of survey information on such things as prices and employment, and the use of ?contingent valuation? surveys has exploded recently. The paper reviews the historical debate that led to economists? seeming distrust of surveys. It then investigates why there is extensive use of surveys in the face of methodological strictures against survey use. To do this, the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Sacha Bourgeois-Gironde (2010). Is Neuroeconomics Doomed by the Reverse Inference Fallacy? Mind and Society 9 (2):229-249.
    Neuroeconomic studies are liable to fall into the reverse inference fallacy, a form of affirmation of the consequent. More generally neuroeconomics relies on two problematic steps, namely the inference from brain activities to the engagement of cognitive processes in experimental tasks, and the presupposition that such inferred cognitive processes are relevant to economic theorizing. The first step only constitutes the reverse inference fallacy proper and ways to correct it include a better sense of the neural response selectivity of the targeted (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. James W. Brock (1993). Junking Corporate America. Critical Review 7 (2-3):225-236.
    A firestorm of deals and <span class='Hi'>debt</span> consumed corporate America during the 1980s. Some contend that this deal mania, and the junk <span class='Hi'>debt</span> that fueled it, enhanced the nation's economic performance and bolstered its global competitiveness. Viewed in the context of its aftermath, however, the evidence suggests that a decade of junk?<span class='Hi'>debt</span> deals subverted economic performance, weakened the country's economy and rendered it dangerously vulnerable to recession, and inflicted a massive opportunity cost vis?à?vis America's foreign rivals.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Vivienne Brown (1997). 'Mere Inventions of the Imagination': A Survey of Recent Literature on Adam Smith. Economics and Philosophy 13 (2):281-312.
  31. Graham A. Brownlow (2010). Structure and Change: Douglass North's Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (3):301-316.
    Douglass North is a pivotal figure in the development of the ?new? economic history as well as the ?new? institutional economics. However, the relationship between these two aspects of his thinking remains undeveloped in previous critical assessments of North's work. The relationship is clarified here. The evidence presented indicates that three distinct phases can be distinguished in his writings between the 1950s and the 2000s. The paper relates these changing views to the shifting mainstream within economics and the effects that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. James M. Buchanan (1998). Political Philosophy, Jean Hampton. Westview Press, 1997, Xiii + 272 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 14 (01):131-.
  33. James M. Buchanan (1985). Political Economy and Social Philosophy51. In Peter Koslowski (ed.), Economics and Philosophy. J.C.B. Mohr. 7--19.
  34. Bryan Caplan (2005). Toward a New Consensus on the Economics of Socialism: Rejoinder to My Critics. Critical Review 17 (1-2):203-220.
    Abstract This has been an unusually productive exchange. My critics largely accept my main theoretical claims about economic calculation and socialism. They have also started to do what advocates of the Misesian view should have been doing for decades: offer empirical evidence that that the calculation problem is serious. While I continue to believe that incentive problems explain most of the failures of socialism, I am slightly less confident than I was before. Fortunately, there are many unexploited sources of information (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Bryan Caplan (2004). Is Socialism Really “Impossible”? Critical Review 16 (1):33-52.
    Abstract In the 1920s, Austrian?school economists began to argue that in a fully socialized economy, free of competitively generated prices, central planners would have no way to calculate which methods of production would be the most economical. They claimed that this ?economic calculation problem? showed that socialism is ?impossible.? Although many believe that the Austrian position was later vindicated by the collapse of the Soviet bloc, the Austrian school's own methodology disallows such a conclusion. And historical evidence suggests that poor (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Ménard Claude (2001). Methodological Issues in New Institutional Economic. Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (1):85-92.
  37. François Claveau (2013). The Elgar Companion to Recent Economic Methodology. Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (1):81 - 86.
    (2013). The Elgar companion to recent economic methodology. Journal of Economic Methodology: Vol. 20, Methodology, Systemic Risk, and the Economics Profession, pp. 81-86. doi: 10.1080/1350178X.2013.774853.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Tyler Cowen (2000). Risk and Business Cycles: Reply to Rosser. Critical Review 14 (1):89-94.
    Abstract Rosser's thoughtful and careful review of my book on business cycles reflects a different methodological stance than my own. I believe that economic theory and macroeconomics cannot escape using the concept of risk, even though, as Rosser points out, risk is not a simple unidimensional magnitude in many circumstances. I view the rational expectations assumption as a useful way of presenting a theory, rather than as a descriptive account of real?world expectations.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Ricardo F. Crespo, Reappraising Austrian Economics' Basic Tenets in the Light of Aristotelian Ideas.
    This paper sustains that reappraising Austrian economics in the light of Aristotelian ideas is not only possible but also fruitful. First, the paper draws a sketch of the essential features of Austrian economics. Next, it argues about the necessity for a thorough analysis of the notion of freedom, and it analyzes Mises's conception. Next, the paper exposes Aristotle's social, epistemological and economic thought related to Austrian main traits. An account of how the exercise of Aristotelian virtues may be synergic with (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. John B. Davis (2007). The Turn in Economics and the Turn in Economic Methodology. Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (3):275-290.
  41. John B. Davis (2007). The Turn in Economics and the Turn in Economic Methodology: Past Chair Address: International Network for Economic Method Conference, Grinnell College, 22 June 2006. [REVIEW] Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (3):275-290.
    There is now considerable evidence that economics is undergoing significant change in which a collection of new research programs all at odds in important respects with standard neoclassical economics is increasingly dominating the economics research frontier (Davis 2006b). These new programs include game theory, evolutionary economics, behavioral economics, experimental economics, agent‐based complexity economics and neuroeconomics. All raise new issues for economics, and contest long‐held assumptions. Such a development, however, naturally raises questions about the nature and direction of economic methodology. Whereas (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. John B. Davis (2005). Introduction. Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (3):361-361.
  43. John B. Davis (2004). Introduction. Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (3):273-273.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. John Davis & Wade Hands (2013). Introduction: Methodology, Systemic Risk, and the Economics Profession. Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (1):1 - 5.
    (2013). Introduction: Methodology, systemic risk, and the economics profession. Journal of Economic Methodology: Vol. 20, Methodology, Systemic Risk, and the Economics Profession, pp. 1-5. doi: 10.1080/1350178X.2013.774842.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Stephen J. DeCanio (1992). Carbon Rights and Economic Development. Critical Review 6 (2-3):389-410.
    Even in the absence of complete scientific consensus on the magnitude, timing, and regional distribution of the effects of global warming caused by greenhouse gas emissions, it is worthwhile to examine potential policy responses to the prospect of climate change. An internalization of the greenhouse externality based on property rights in carbon emissions offers the potential to promote rather than retard worldwide economic development. As the world economy moves in a market?oriented direction, the arbitrary wealth transfers associated with a carbon?rights (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Thomas Donaldson & Thomas W. Dunfee (1995). Integrative Social Contracts Theory. Economics and Philosophy 11 (01):85-.
    Difficult moral issues in economic life, such as evaluating the impact of hostile takeovers and plant relocations or determining the obligations of business to the environment, constitute the raison d'etre of business ethics. Yet, while the ultimate resolution of such issues clearly requires detailed, normative analysis, a shortcoming of business ethics is that to date it has failed to develop an adequate normative theory.1 The failing is especially acute when it results in an inability to provide a basis for fine-grained (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Kurt Dopfer & Jason Potts (2004). Evolutionary Realism: A New Ontology for Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (2):195-212.
    The renaissance in evolutionary economics in the past two decades has brought with it a great deal of theoretical development and interdisciplinary import. Much of this has been useful, but not all of it has been commensurate. In this paper, we make the case for the limits to theoretical developments that lack clearly specified ontological commitments by attempting an inductive synthesis of the ontological content of empirical generalizations in evolutionary economics. We call this ?evolutionary realism? and present it in three (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Sheila Dow (2007). Introduction: The Methodology of Development Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (1):1-4.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Sheila C. Dow (2004). Reorienting Economics: Some Epistemological Issues. Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (3):307-312.
    Criticizes the book "Reorienting Economics," by Tony Lawson. Emphasis on the character of the middle ground between positivism and relativism; Conception of reality implicit in economic practice; Inconsistency between the methodology of orthodox economics.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Sheila C. Dow (2001). Methodology in a Pluralist Environment. Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (1):33-40.
1 — 50 / 155