Year:

  1.  7
    What’s Left of Human Nature? A Post-Essentialist, Pluralist, and Interactive Account of a C. [REVIEW]Andrew Buskell - 2019 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 32 (2):137-140.
    Volume 32, Issue 2, June 2019, Page 137-140.
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  2.  7
    From Ontological Traits to Validity Challenges in Social Science: The Cases of Economic Experiments and Research Questionnaires.María Caamaño-Alegre & José Caamaño-Alegre - 2019 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 32 (2):101-127.
    ABSTRACTThis article examines how problems of validity in empirical social research differ from those in natural science. Specifically, we focus on how some ontological peculiarities of the object...
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  3.  19
    Climate Models: How to Assess Their Reliability.Martin Carrier & Johannes Lenhard - 2019 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 32 (2):81-100.
    The paper discusses modelling uncertainties in climate models and how they can be addressed based on physical principles as well as based on how the models perform in light of empirical data. We ar...
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  4.  44
    Why Adding Truths Is Not Enough: A Reply to Mizrahi on Progress as Approximation to the Truth.Gustavo Cevolani & Luca Tambolo - 2019 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 32 (2):129-135.
    ABSTRACTIn a recent paper in this journal, entitled ‘Scientific Progress: Why Getting Closer to Truth is Not Enough’, Moti Mizrahi argues that the view of progress as approximation to the truth or increasing verisimilitude is plainly false. The key premise of his argument is that on such a view of progress, in order to get closer to the truth one only needs to arbitrarily add a true disjunct to a hypothesis or theory. Since quite clearly scientific progress is not a (...)
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  5.  29
    In What Sense Can There Be Evolution by Natural Selection Without Perfect Inheritance?Pierrick Bourrat - 2019 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 32 (1):13-31.
    ABSTRACTIn Darwinian Population and Natural Selection, Peter Godfrey-Smith brought the topic of natural selection back to the forefront of philosophy of biology, highlighting different issues surro...
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  6.  5
    Springer Handbook of Model-Based Science: Edited by Lorenzo Magnani and Tommaso Bertolotti, Cham, Springer, 2017, Xl + 1179 Pp., ISBN 9783319305257, €298.Daniele Chiffi - 2019 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 32 (1):65-67.
    Volume 32, Issue 1, March 2019, Page 65-67.
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  7.  8
    In Praise of Natural Philosophy: A Revolution for Thought and Life: By Nicholas Maxwell, Montreal, McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2017, Xii+342 Pp., ISBN 9780773549029, Can$110.00, US$110.00 ; ISBN 9780773549036, Can$34.95, US$29.95.Mohammad Reza Haghighi Fard - 2019 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 32 (1):67-69.
    Volume 32, Issue 1, March 2019, Page 67-69.
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  8.  25
    The New Mechanical Philosophy: By Stuart Glennan, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2017, Xii + 266 Pp., ISBN 9780198779711, £30.00, US$40.95.Lena Kästner - 2019 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 32 (1):69-72.
    Volume 32, Issue 1, March 2019, Page 69-72.
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  9.  33
    The Gordian Knot of Demarcation: Tying Up Some Loose Ends.Kåre Letrud - 2019 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 32 (1):3-11.
    In this article, I seek to improve upon a definition of pseudoscience put forward by Sven Ove Hansson. I argue that not only does its use of ‘pseudoscientific statement’ as definiendum inadequately address the theoretical issue of demarcation, it also makes the definition inapt for practical demarcation. Moreover, I argue that Hanson’s definition subsumes statements and associated practices that are forms of bad science, resulting in an unfavourably wide concept. I try to save the definition from the brunt of this (...)
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  10.  15
    Geometry: The Third Book of Foundations: By Michel Serres, Translated by Randolph Burks, London, Bloomsbury, 2017, Lviii + 219 Pp., ISBN 9781474281416, £19.99.Michalis Sialaros - 2019 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 32 (1):75-77.
    Volume 32, Issue 1, March 2019, Page 75-77.
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  11.  18
    The Kuhnian Image of Science: Time for a Decisive Transformation?: Edited by Moti Mizrahi, Lanham, MD, Rowman and Littlefield, 2018, Vi + 224 Pp., ISBN 9781786603401, US$120.00, £80.00. [REVIEW]Massimiliano Simons - 2019 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 32 (1):78-80.
    Review of the book "The Kuhnian Image of Science'.
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  12.  9
    What is Information?: By Peter Janich, Translated by Eric Hayot and Lea Pao, Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press, 2018, Xxii + 191 Pp., ISBN 9781517900083, US$100.00 ; ISBN 9781517900090, US$25.00.Sille Obelitz Søe - 2019 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 32 (1):73-75.
    Volume 32, Issue 1, March 2019, Page 73-75.
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  13.  43
    Establishing Causal Claims in Medicine.Jon Williamson - 2019 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 32 (1):33-61.
    ABSTRACTRusso and Williamson [2007. “Interpreting Causality in the Health Sciences.” International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 21: 157–170] put forward the following thesis: in order to establish a causal claim in medicine, one normally needs to establish both that the putative cause and putative effect are appropriately correlated and that there is some underlying mechanism that can account for this correlation. I argue that, although the Russo–Williamson thesis conflicts with the tenets of present-day evidence-based medicine, it offers a better (...)
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