This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

0 found
Order:
  1. The Chemical Philosophy of Robert Boyle: Mechanicism, Chymical Atoms, and Emergence.Marina P. Banchetti - 2020 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    This book examines the way in which Robert Boyle seeks to accommodate his complex chemical philosophy within the framework of a mechanistic theory of matter. More specifically, the book proposes that Boyle regards chemical qualities as properties that emerged from the mechanistic structure of chymical atoms. Within Boyle’s chemical ontology, chymical atoms are structured concretions of particles that Boyle regards as chemically elementary entities, that is, as chemical wholes that resist experimental analysis. Although this interpretation of Boyle’s chemical philosophy has (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. How to Handle Risky Experiments Producing Uncertain Phenomenon Like Cold Fusion?Robert W. P. Luk - 2019 - Science and Philosophy 7 (2):3-14.
    Some experiments are risky in that they cannot repeatedly produce certain phenomenon at will for study because the scientific knowledge of the process generating the uncertain phenomenon is poorly understood or may directly contradict with existing scientific knowledge. These experiments may have great impact not just to the scientific community but to mankind in general. Banning them from study may incur societies a great opportunity cost but accepting them runs the risk that scientists are doing junk science. How to make (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Reduction and Emergence in Chemistry.Vanessa Seifert - 2019 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The aim of this article is to present a different perspective through which to examine reduction and emergence; namely, the perspective of chemistry’s relation to physics.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. What to Make of Mendeleev’s Predictions?K. Brad Wray - 2019 - Foundations of Chemistry 21 (2):139-143.
    I critically examine Stewart’s suggestion that we should weigh the various predictions Mendeleev made differently. I argue that in his effort to justify discounting the weight of some of Mendeleev’s failures, Stewart invokes a principle that will, in turn, reduce the weight of some of the successful predictions Mendeleev made. So Stewart’s strategy will not necessarily lead to a net gain in Mendeleev’s favor.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Messy Chemical Kinds.Joyce C. Havstad - 2018 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 69 (3):719-743.
    Following Kripke and Putnam, the received view of chemical kinds has been a microstructuralist one. To be a microstructuralist about chemical kinds is to think that membership in said kinds is conferred by microstructural properties. Recently, the received microstructuralist view has been elaborated and defended, but it has also been attacked on the basis of complexities, both chemical and ontological. Here, I look at which complexities really challenge the microstructuralist view; at how the view itself might be made more complicated (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  6. Guest Editor: Foundations of Chemistry (Special Issue).Marina P. Banchetti - 2017 - Foundations of Chemistry 19 (1).
  7. Peter J. T. Morris: The Matter Factory: A History of the Chemistry Laboratory: Reaktion Books, London, In Association with Science Museum, London, 2015, 416 Pp., $45.00, £30.00, ISBN: 978-1-78023-442-7.Roderick Black - 2017 - Foundations of Chemistry 19 (1):93-94.
  8. A Colourful Bond Between Art and Chemistry.Nuno Francisco, Carla Morais, João C. Paiva & Paula Gameiro - 2017 - Foundations of Chemistry 19 (2):125-138.
    How can a work of art give us clues about scientific aspects? How can chemistry help a painter enhance his creativity and, above all, preserve the original characteristics of his work? Does an artist require scientific knowledge to innovate or, at least, not to be faked? Other symbiotic fields between art and science are: tattoos, as body art with physical and chemical consequences; pigments, as basic materials with interesting historiographical preparations; spectroscopy diagnosis, as very broad and thorough method of analysis (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. The Letter, the Dictionary and the Laboratory: Translating Chemistry and Mineralogy in Eighteenth-Century France.Patrice Bret - 2016 - Annals of Science 73 (2):122-142.
    SUMMARYEighteenth-century scientific translation was not just a linguistic or intellectual affair. It included numerous material aspects requiring a social organization to marshal the indispensable human and non-human actors. Paratexts and actors' correspondences provide a good observatory to get information about aspects such as shipments and routes, processes of translation and language acquisition, texts acquisition and dissemination.The nature of scientific translation changed in France during the second half of the eighteenth century. Beside solitary translators, it also happened to become a collective (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Conceptual Analysis for Nanoscience.Julia Bursten, Jill Millstone & Michael J. Hartmann - 2016 - Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters 7:1917-1918.
    A short overview, written for a primarily scientific audience, of how conceptual analysis and philosophy of science can assist in nanoscience research.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Natural Kinds and Classification in Scientific Practice.Catherine Kendig (ed.) - 2016 - Routledge.
    This edited volume of 13 new essays aims to turn past discussions of natural kinds on their head. Instead of presenting a metaphysical view of kinds based largely on an unempirical vantage point, it pursues questions of kindedness which take the use of kinds and activities of kinding in practice as significant in the articulation of them as kinds. The book brings philosophical study of current and historical episodes and case studies from various scientific disciplines to bear on natural kinds (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  12. Connecting the Philosophy of Chemistry, Green Chemistry, and Moral Philosophy.Jean-Pierre Llored & Stéphane Sarrade - 2016 - Foundations of Chemistry 18 (2):125-152.
    This paper aims to connect philosophy of chemistry, green chemistry, and moral philosophy. We first characterize chemistry by underlining how chemists: co-define chemical bodies, operations, and transformations; always refer to active and context-sensitive bodies to explain the reactions under study; and develop strategies that require and intertwine with a molecular whole, its parts, and the surroundings at the same time within an explanation. We will then point out how green chemists are transforming their current activities in order to act upon (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13. Faculty Beliefs About the Purposes for Teaching Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Courses.Michael Mack & Marcy H. Towns - 2016 - .
    We report the results of a phenomenographic analysis of faculty beliefs about the purposes for teaching upper-division physical chemistry courses in the undergraduate curriculum. A purposeful sampling strategy was used to recruit a diverse group of faculty for interviews. Collectively, the participating faculty regularly teach or have taught physical chemistry courses in 16 different chemistry departments in the United States. While faculty agreed that the goal of teaching physical chemistry was to help students develop robust conceptual knowledge of the subject (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. The Limits of Matter. Chemistry, Mining & Enlightenment.David Philip Miller - 2016 - Annals of Science 73 (1):110-112.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Chemistry as a Practical Science: Edward Caldin Revisited.Peeter Müürsepp - 2016 - Foundations of Chemistry 18 (2):113-123.
    This is an attempt to take a look at chemistry from the point of view of practical realism. Besides its social–historical and normative aspects, the latter involves a direct reference to experimental research. According to Edward Caldin chemistry depends on our being able to isolate pure substances with reproducible properties. Thus, the very basis of chemistry is practical. Even the laws of chemistry are not stable but are subject to correction. At the same time, these statements do not necessarily make (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. Chemistry as a Practical Science.Peeter Müürsepp - 2016 - Foundations of Chemistry 18 (3):213-223.
    This is an attempt to take a look at chemistry from the point of view of practical realism. Besides its social–historical and normative aspects, the latter involves a direct reference to experimental research. According to Edward Caldin chemistry depends on our being able to isolate pure substances with reproducible properties. Thus, the very basis of chemistry is practical. Even the laws of chemistry are not stable but are subject to correction. At the same time, these statements do not necessarily make (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17. Philosophy of Chemistry: Unkempt Jungle and Fertile Ground: Eric Scerri and Lee McIntyre : Philosophy of Chemistry: Growth of a New Discipline . Dordrecht: Springer, 2015. Xii+233pp, $99 HB.Micah Newman - 2016 - Metascience 25 (3):473-477.
  18. Ideograms for Physics and Chemistry.Pablo García Risueño, Apostolos Syropoulos & Natàlia Vergés - 2016 - Foundations of Physics 46 (12):1713-1721.
    Ideograms have great communicative value. They refer to concepts in a simple manner, easing the understanding of related ideas. Moreover, ideograms can simplify the often cumbersome notation used in the fields of Physics and physical Chemistry. Nonetheless only a few ideograms—like \ and Å—have been defined to date. In this work we propose that the scientific community follows the example of Mathematics—as well as that of oriental languages—and bestows a more important role upon ideograms. To support this thesis we propose (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. The Philosophy of Chemistry.Eric Scerri & Grant Fisher (eds.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Essays in Philosophy of Chemistry.Eric Scerri & Grant Fisher (eds.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21. Chemistry and the Problem of Pluralism in Science: An Analysis Concerning Philosophical and Scientific Disagreements.Rein Vihalemm - 2016 - Foundations of Chemistry 18 (2):91-102.
    Chemistry, especially its historical practice, has in the philosophy of science in recent decades attracted more and more attention, influencing the turn from the vision of science as a timeless logic-centred system of statements towards the history- and practice-centred approach. The problem of pluralism in science has become a popular topic in that context. Hasok Chang’s “active normative epistemic pluralism” manifested in his book Is water H2O? Evidence, realism and pluralism, pursuing an integrated study of history and philosophy of science, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  22. Reductionism and the Relation Between Chemistry and Physics.Hasok Chang - 2015 - In Ana Simões, Jürgen Renn & Theodore Arabatzis (eds.), Relocating the History of Science. Springer Verlag.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  23. Foundations of and Challenges to Electrolyte Chemistry.Kevin Charles de Berg - 2015 - Foundations of Chemistry 17 (1):33-48.
    Mathematics is so common-place in modern physics and chemistry that one may not realise how controversial its admittance was to these fields in the eightieth and ninetieth centuries respectively. This paper deals with the controversy during the formation of physical chemistry as a discipline in the late ninetieth and early twentieth centuries and sketches more recent criticisms of the way mathematics has been used in solution chemistry. The controversy initially related particularly to electrolyte chemistry and its emerging use of mathematics (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. On Some Characteristics of Marcus’ Work in the Light of the History of Science.Francesco Di Giacomo - 2015 - Foundations of Chemistry 17 (1):67-78.
    Professor Rudolph A. Marcus, recipient of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, is a distinguished theoretical chemist. Two important theories happen to bear his name: the Rice Ramsperger Kassel Marcus theory of unimolecular reactions and the Marcus theory of electron transfer reactions. When considering Marcus’ work, one finds characteristics of it that bear striking similarity to those that can be found in the work of some famous scientists. Such characteristics appear then as common recurring patterns in the work of theoreticians. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. “Do We Need to Memorize That?” or Cognitive Science for Chemists.JudithAnn R. Hartman & Eric A. Nelson - 2015 - Foundations of Chemistry 17 (3):263-274.
    In introductory chemistry courses, should students be encouraged to solve problems by reasoning based on conceptual understanding or by applying memorized facts and algorithms? Cognitive scientists have recently studied this issue with the assistance of new technologies. In the current consensus model for cognition, during problem solving the brain relies on “working memory” to sequentially process small elements of knowledge. Working memory is able to hold and manipulate virtually all elements that can be recalled “with automaticity” from long-term memory, but (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Green Chemistry in Africa – its Inception and Challenges.Ndze Denis Jumbam - 2015 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 70 (2):187-190.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Deliberating Responsibility: A Collective Contribution by the C’Nano IdF Nanoscience & Society Office.Stéphanie Lacour, Sacha Loeve, Brice Laurent, Virginie Albe, Aurélie Delemarle, Bernard Bartenlian & Sophie Lanone - 2015 - Foundations of Chemistry 17 (3):225-245.
    The very existence of explicit techno-scientific controversies in the “nano” arena is often denied on behalf of a conception of science, risks, public engagement and responsibility which borders on a disembodied idealism and merits at least serious discussion. The recurrence of this view prompted us to clarify our position regarding our common field of research, in order to avoid being trapped in the seemingly clear divide between the universal and neutral pursuit of pure science, on the one hand, and on (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Guest Editorial.Jean-Pierre Llored - 2015 - Foundations of Chemistry 17 (3):183-185.
  29. Style of Reasoning and Technical-Cultural Capillary Action in the Chemistry of 18th Century.Ronei Clécio Mocellin - 2015 - Scientiae Studia 13 (4):759-780.
    RESUMO Neste artigo pretendo identificar um "estilo de raciocínio" próprio à química e apontar a disseminação de seus produtos e conceitos. O objetivo é o de explicitar alguns elementos que caracterizam o estilo de pensar e de fazer da química na segunda metade do século XVIII, sua capilarização técnico-cultural. O delineamento de um estilo químico de raciocinar origina-se da constância dos espaços técnico-epistêmicos em que o saber químico é construído. A química é uma ciência de laboratório, eminentemente técnica e operatória, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Art, Science and Ideology in 19th-Century Advertisement for Liebig's Extract of Meat.Cecilia Molinari de Rennie - 2015 - Hyle: International Journal for Philosophy of Chemistry 21 (1):39-60.
    In this paper I discuss the practices of the production Inventions of the 19th Century, a piece of ephemera from the late 19th centruy belonging to the marketing campaign for Liebig’s Extract of Meat. I approach my corpus from a socio-semiotic perspective, using the tools of Multimodal Discourse Analysis to show how meanings are encoded in the text. On the basis of this description I explore from the perspective of Critical Discourse Analysis the discursive strategies employed by the producers of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. The “Extent of Reaction”: A Powerful Concept to Study Chemical Transformations at the First-Year General Chemistry Courses.Giuliano Moretti - 2015 - Foundations of Chemistry 17 (2):107-115.
    The concept of extent of reaction was discussed many times in physical chemistry journals and books. This contribution strongly suggests the use of the extent of reaction as standard basic tool in teaching stoichiometry. The same idea was suggested several times in the past without success because the concept of extent of reaction is still not presented in the first-year general chemistry textbooks. It is also remarked that the concept of extent of reaction represents a simple example of the way (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Jean-Pierre Llored : The Philosophy of Chemistry: Practices, Methodologies, and Concepts: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK, 2013. Xx + 764 Pp., $113 , ISBN: 978-1443846059.Gábor Palló - 2015 - Foundations of Chemistry 17 (1):87-89.
    Chemists do not interpret the world in various ways; their point is to change it. This variation on Karl Marx’ Feuerbach thesis came to my mind while reading the new Philosophy of Chemistry volume.The 11th thesis originally sounds like this: “Philosophers have hitherto only interpreted the world in various ways; the point is to change it”. The thick book contains more than forty studies related to the relatively new field. In this short review, it would be too much even to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Romanian Studies in Philosophy of Science.Ilie Pȃrvu, Gabriel Sandu & Iulian D. Toader (eds.) - 2015 - Boston Studies in the Philosophy and History of Science, vol. 313: Springer.
    This is a collection of studies by contemporary Romanian philosophers of science. As it happens, it ruffled a lot of feathers, to the extent that the book is largely ignored in Romania, although it does quite well internationally, with some really good citations. Check it out!
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Manuel DeLanda: "Philosophical Chemistry: Genealogy of a Scientific Field". [REVIEW]Joachim Schummer - 2015 - Hyle: International Journal for Philosophy of Chemistry 21 (1):65-67.
    Book Review of Manuel DeLanda: Philosophical Chemistry: Genealogy of a Scientific Field, London 2015.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Interface Fracture and Chemistry of a Tungsten-Based Metallization on Borophosphosilicate Glass.B. Völker, W. Heinz, K. Matoy, R. Roth, J. M. Batke, T. Schöberl, C. Scheu & G. Dehm - 2015 - Philosophical Magazine 95 (16-18):1967-1981.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. From Corpuscles to Elements: Chemical Ontologies From Van Helmont to Lavoisier.Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino - 2014 - In Lee McIntyre & Eric Scerri (eds.), Philosophy of Chemistry: Growth of a New Discipline. Springer. pp. 141-154.
  37. Similarity and Representation in Chemical Knowledge Practices.Juan Bautista Bengoetxea, Oliver Todt & José Luis Luján - 2014 - Foundations of Chemistry 16 (3):215-233.
    This paper argues for the theoretical and practical validity of similarity as a useful epistemological tool in scientific knowledge generation, specifically in chemistry. Classical analyses of similarity in philosophy of science do not account for the concept’s practical significance in scientific activities. We recur to examples from chemistry to counter the claim of authors like Quine or Goodman to the effect that similarity must be excluded from scientific practices . In conclusion we argue that more recent conceptualizations of the notion (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Philosophy of Chemistry or Philosophy with Chemistry.Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent - 2014 - Hyle: International Journal for Philosophy of Chemistry 20 (1):59-76.
    Chemistry deserves more philosophical attention not so much to do justice to a long-neglected science or to enhance its cultural prestige, but to undermine a number of taken-for-granted assumptions about scientific rationality and more importantly to diversify our metaphysical views of nature and reality. In brief, this paper does not make the case for a philosophy of chemistry. It rather urges philosophers of science to listen to chemists and discuss what they learn from them. Because over the course of many (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39. Beeing & Time: Kiss of Chemoreception & the Bug in Dasein's Mouth.Virgil W. Brower - 2014 - In Laurence Talairach-Vielmas & Marie Bouchet (eds.), Insects in Literature & the Arts. Brussels, Belgium: pp. 197-217.
    "Brower explores the way philosophers were inspired by entomological social systems and communication to reflect on human psyche, social behavior, community organization, communication, and inter-individual relationships. His essay rehearses the swarms of insects embedded in contemporary philosophy and literary theory, not only showing how many of the major concepts (or philosophemes) in continental philosophy – sexuality, politics, thinking, time, interdependence, and language – draw lessons from the world of insects, but also illustrating again how the insect world spurred human reflection.".
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Historical Teaching of Atomic and Molecular Structure.José Antonio Chamizo & Andoni Garritz - 2014 - In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. pp. 343-374.
    Besides the presentation and conclusions, the chapter is divided into two equally important sections. The first one describes the modern development of atomic and molecular structure, emphasising some of the philosophical problems that have been taken, and those that have to be faced in its understanding. The second discusses the alternative conceptions and difficulties of students of different educational levels and also the different approaches to its historical or philosophical teaching. Finally, we recognise the necessity for science teachers to assume (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. A Matter Of Substance?: Gaston Bachelard on Chemistry’s Philosophical Lessons.Cristina Chimisso - 2014 - Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 17:33-44.
    Philosophers have paid far less attention to chemistry than they have to physics. It is only in the last twenty years or so that the philosophy of chemistry has gained an important place in the philosophy of science. However, before then, there have been important exceptions to the neglect of chemistry. Notably, chemistry has been very important in the French tradition: Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent has argued that the attention that Pierre Duhem, Emile Meyerson, Hélène Metzger and Gaston Bachelard paid to chemistry (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Laws and Explanations in Biology and Chemistry: Philosophical Perspectives and Educational Implications.Zoubeida R. Dagher & Sibel Erduran - 2014 - In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. pp. 1203-1233.
    This chapter utilises scholarship in philosophy of biology and philosophy of chemistry to produce meaningful implications for biology and chemistry education. The primary purpose for studying philosophical literature is to identify different perspectives on the nature of laws and explanations within these disciplines. The goal is not to resolve ongoing debates about the nature of laws and explanations but to consider their multiple forms and purposes in ways that promote deep and practical understanding of biological and chemical knowledge in educational (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  43. Pure Possibilities and Some Striking Scientific Discoveries.Amihud Gilead - 2014 - Foundations of Chemistry 16 (2):149-163.
    Regardless or independent of any actuality or actualization and exempt from spatiotemporal and causal conditions, each individual possibility is pure. Actualism excludes the existence of individual pure possibilities, altogether or at least as existing independently of actual reality. In this paper, I demonstrate, on the grounds of my possibilist metaphysics—panenmentalism—how some of the most fascinating scientific discoveries in chemistry could not have been accomplished without relying on pure possibilities and the ways in which they relate to each other . The (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  44. Chain Reactions, “Impossible” Reactions, and Panenmentalist Possibilities.Amihud Gilead - 2014 - Foundations of Chemistry 16 (3):201-214.
    Panenmentalist possibilities are individual pure possibilities existing independently of any mind, actual reality, and possible-world conception. These possibilities are a priori accessible to our intellect and imagination. In this paper, I attempt to shed some panenmentalist light on the discovery of chemical branched chain reactions and its implications on biology and cancer research. I also examine the case of the Belousov–Zhabotinsky reaction which, at first, was believed to be impossible. Finally, I proceed to examine through a panenmentalist lens Szilard’s discovery (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45. Roald Hoffmann on the Philosophy, Art, and Science of Chemistry.Jeffrey Kovac & Michael Weisberg (eds.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Nobel laureate Roald Hoffmann's contributions to chemistry are well known. Less well known, however, is that over a career that spans nearly fifty years, Hoffmann has thought and written extensively about a wide variety of other topics, such as chemistry's relationship to philosophy, literature, and the arts, including the nature of chemical reasoning, the role of symbolism and writing in science, and the relationship between art and craft and science. In Roald Hoffmann on the Philosophy, Art, and Science of Chemistry, (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46. Six Phases of Cosmic Chemistry.Lukasz Lamza - 2014 - Hyle: International Journal for Philosophy of Chemistry 20 (1):165-192.
    The article presents a conceptually unified, quantitative account of the development of chemical phenomena throughout the cosmic history, with a detailed discussion of the cosmological, astrophysical, geological, biological, and anthropological context. The totality of cosmic chemistry is represented by a list of 176 classes of phenomena, drawn from the Universal Decimal Classification library cataloguing system, and divided into 6 phases: of no chemistry, of prestellar chemistry, of galactic chemistry, of planetary chemistry, of biological chemistry, of human history. These are separated (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47. Chemistry, Knowledge Through Actions?Pierre Laszlo - 2014 - Hyle: International Journal for Philosophy of Chemistry 20 (1):93-116.
    This paper starts from the premise that the philosophy of chemistry needs to be primarily a philosophy of action. Its main task is to reflect on what chemists do, in their actual practice; not to bother with an ontological strawman, the fictional derivation from physics. As an autonomous science, chemistry has its own iconic language. Do diagrams, structural formulas, molecular models, and their mental images draw upon tacit knowledge? To a chemist, intent upon thinking about his current molecular object, can (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. How Much Philosophy in the Philosophy of Chemistry?Alexandru Manafu - 2014 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 45 (1):33-44.
    This paper aims to show that there is a lot of philosophy in the philosophy of chemistry—not only in the problems and questions specific to chemistry, which this science brings up in philosophical discussions, but also in the topics of wider interest like reductionism and emergence, for which chemistry proves to be an ideal case study. The fact that chemical entities and properties are amenable to a quantitative understanding, to measurement and experiment to a greater extent than those in psychology (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49. Environmental Sustainability: Implications and Limitations to Green Chemistry. [REVIEW]Carlos Alberto Marques & Adélio A. S. C. Machado - 2014 - Foundations of Chemistry 16 (2):125-147.
    This study discusses the relationship between Green Chemistry and Environmental Sustainability as expressed in textbooks and articles on Green Chemistry authored by their promoters. It was found that although the Brundtland concept of Sustainable Development/Sustainability has been mentioned often by green chemists, a full analysis of that relationship was almost never attempted. In particular, green chemists have paid scarce attention to the importance of The Second Law of thermodynamics on Environmental Sustainability and the consequences of the limitations it imposes on (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50. The ‘Chemistry of Space’: The Sources of Hermann Grassmann's Scientific Achievements.Hans-Joachim Petsche - 2014 - Annals of Science 71 (4):522-576.
    Albert Lewis's article analysing the influence of Friedrich Schleiermacher on Hermann Grassmann, stimulated many different studies on the founder of n-dimensional outer algebra.Following a brief outline of the various, sometimes diverging, analyses of Grassmann's creative thinking, new research is presented which confirms Lewis's original contribution and widens it considerably. It will be shown that:i. Grassmann, although a self-taught mathematician, was at the centre of a hitherto understated intellectual trend, which was defining for Germany. Initiated by Pestalozzi's concept of elementary mathematical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  51. Nothing in this category. Everyone can categorize entries. Please help if you have the expertise.