Results for 'Codes of conduct'

998 found
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  1.  17
    Revisiting Supplier Compliance with MNC Codes of Conduct: Recoupling Policy and Practice at Chinese Toy Suppliers.Niklas Egels-Zandén - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (1):59-75.
    Does private regulation of workers’ rights in global value chains improve working conditions on the factory floor? Drawing on one of the first systematic longitudinal studies of supplier compliance with multinational corporation (MNC) codes of conduct, this paper finds—in contrast to previous research—substantial improvements over time. While in 2004, the four examined Chinese toy suppliers violated most of the evaluated code of conduct criteria and consciously decoupled the code of conduct policy from actual practices, by 2009 (...)
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  2.  44
    Corporate Codes of Conduct: The Effects of Code Content and Quality on Ethical Performance. [REVIEW]Patrick M. Erwin - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (4):535 - 548.
    Corporate codes of conduct are a practical corporate social responsibility (CSR) instrument commonly used to govern employee behavior and establish a socially responsible organizational culture. The effectiveness of these codes has been widely discussed on theoretical grounds and empirically tested in numerous previous reports that directly compare companies with and without codes of conduct. Empirical research has yielded inconsistent results that may be explained by multiple ancillary factors, including the quality of code content and implementation, (...)
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  3.  38
    Suppliers' Compliance with Mncs' Codes of Conduct: Behind the Scenes at Chinese Toy Suppliers. [REVIEW]Niklas Egels-Zandén - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 75 (1):45 - 62.
    Despite increased academic and practitioner interest in codes of conduct, there has been little research into the actual compliance of suppliers in developing countries with the codes of conduct of multinational corporations (MNCs). This paper addresses this lack by analysing Chinese suppliers’ level of compliance with Swedish toy retailers’ codes of conduct. Based on unannounced and unofficial interviews with employees of Chinese suppliers, the study shows that all of the nine studied suppliers breached some (...)
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  4.  75
    The Effect of Country and Culture on Perceptions of Appropriate Ethical Actions Prescribed by Codes of Conduct: A Western European Perspective Among Accountants.Donald F. Arnold, Richard A. Bernardi, Presha E. Neidermeyer & Josef Schmee - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (4):327-340.
    Recognizing the growing interdependence of the European Union and the importance of codes of conduct in companies’ operations, this research examines the effect of a country’s culture on the implementation of a code of conduct in a European context. We examine whether the perceptions of an activity’s ethicality relates to elements found in company codes of conduct vary by country or according to Hofstede’s (1980, Culture’s Consequences (Sage Publications, Beverly Hills, CA)) cultural constructs of: Uncertainty (...)
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  5.  34
    Women Workers, Industrialization, Global Supply Chains and Corporate Codes of Conduct.Marina Prieto-Carrón - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (1):5-17.
    The restructured globalized economy has provided women with employment opportunities. Globalisation has also meant a shift towards self-regulation of multinationals as part of the restructuring of the world economy that increases among others things, flexible employment practices, worsening of labour conditions and lower wages for many women workers around the world. In this context, as part of the global trend emphasising Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in the 1980s, one important development has been the growth of voluntary Corporate Codes of (...)
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  6.  42
    Implementing Supplier Codes of Conduct in Global Supply Chains: Process Explanations From Theoretic and Empirical Perspectives.Bin Jiang - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):77-92.
    Western buying companies impose Supplier Codes of Conduct (SCC) on their suppliers in developing countries; however, many suppliers cannot fully comply with SCC and some of them even cheat in SCC. In this research, we link contract characteristics - price pressure, production complexity, contract duration - to the likelihood of supplier's commitment to SCC through a mediating process: how the buying companies govern their suppliers. Our structural equation model analysis shows that the hierarchy/relational norms governance is a perfect (...)
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  7.  53
    Business Approaches to Combating Bribery: A Study of Codes of Conduct[REVIEW]Kathryn Gordon & Maiko Miyake - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 34 (3-4):161 - 173.
    The question of what firms do internally in the fight against bribery is probably as important to the successful outcome of that fight as formal anti-bribery law and enforcement. This paper looks at corporate approaches to anti-bribery commitment and compliance management using an inventory of 246 codes of conduct. It suggests that, while bribery is often mentioned in the codes of conduct, there is considerable diversity in the language and concepts adopted in anti-bribery commitments. This diversity (...)
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  8.  22
    Private Regulation and Trade Union Rights: Why Codes of Conduct Have Limited Impact on Trade Union Rights.Niklas Egels-Zandén & Jeroen Merk - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (3):1-13.
    Codes of conduct are the main tools to privately regulate worker rights in global value chains. Scholars have shown that while codes may improve outcome standards (such as occupational health and safety), they have had limited impact on process rights (such as freedom of association and collective bargaining). Scholars have, though, only provided vague or general explanations for this empirical finding. We address this shortcoming by providing a holistic and detailed explanation, and argue that codes, in (...)
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  9.  31
    Codes of Conduct in Organisational Context: From Cascade to Lattice-Work of Codes[REVIEW]Lutz Preuss - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (4):471 - 487.
    Codes of conduct have proliferated not only at company level, but also at supra-and suborganisational levels. However, the latter have remained an under-researched area within the CSR literature. Hence, this article examined what range of organisational and sub-organisational codes large companies - here the FTSE100 constituent companies -have developed. The article isolated seven different types of organisational and sub-organisational codes, which together with six supraorganisational ones form a lattice-work of intermeshing documents. Such a division of labour (...)
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  10.  35
    Are Ethical Codes of Conduct Toothless Tigers for Dealing with Employment Discrimination?Lars-Eric Petersen & Franciska Krings - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (4):501-514.
    This study examined the influence of two organizational context variables, codes of conduct and supervisor advice, on personnel decisions in an experimental simulation. Specifically, we studied personnel evaluations and decisions in a situation where codes of conduct conflict with supervisor advice. Past studies showed that supervisors’ advice to prefer ingroup over outgroup candidates leads to discriminatory personnel selection decisions. We extended this line of research by studying how codes of conduct and code enforcement may (...)
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  11. Codes of Conduct in Subcontracting Networks: A Labour Law Perspective. [REVIEW]André Sobczak - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 44 (2-3):225 - 234.
    In the past ten years, many European companies organised into subcontracting networks have decided to adopt codes of conduct to regulate labour relations and to ensure the respect of fundamental social rights. This paper first determines the context and the issues to be addressed by codes of conduct within networks of companies, and second analyses the terms under which they can be implemented. The paper argues that codes of conduct can complement the standards developed (...)
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  12.  33
    Using Student Generated Codes of Conduct in the Classroom to Reinforce Business Ethics Education.Cheryl L. Buff & Virginia Yonkers - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (2):101-110.
    This paper presents four different contexts in which students practiced implementing business ethics. Students were required to develop Codes of Conduct/Codes of Ethics as a classroom exercise. By developing these codes, students can improve their understanding of how and why codes of conduct are developed, designed, and implemented in the workplace. Using the three-phase content analysis process (McCabe et al.: 1999, The Journal of Higher Education 70(2), 211–234), we identify a framework consisting of 10 (...)
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  13.  7
    Voluntary Codes of Conduct and Their Implementation in the Australian Mining and Petroleum Industries: Is There a Business Case for CSR? [REVIEW]Tapan K. Sarker - 2013 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 2 (2):205-224.
    The design and development of appropriate regulatory mechanisms have attracted renewed attention in recent years. In particular, a shift towards voluntary self-regulatory mechanisms has been witnessed within many industries, such as the Australian mining and petroleum industries which have developed voluntary codes of conduct. This paper analyses the development of different regulatory forms and provides a brief comparative analysis of the two main voluntary codes of conduct used by the Australian mining and petroleum industries. In particular, (...)
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  14.  30
    The Potential of Standards and Codes of Conduct in Governing Large-Scale Land Acquisition in Developing Countries Towards Sustainability.Lieske Voget-Kleschin & Setareh Stephan - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (6):1157-1179.
    Commercial interest in land (large-scale land acquisition, LaSLA) in developing countries is a hot topic for debate and its potential consequences are contentious: proponents conceive of it as much needed investment into the formerly neglected agricultural sector while opponents point to severe social and environmental effects. This contribution discusses, if and how sustainability standards and codes of conduct can contribute towards governing LaSLA. Based on the WCED-definition we develop a conception of sustainability that allows framing potential negative effects (...)
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  15.  60
    Global Business Citizenship and Voluntary Codes of Ethical Conduct.Jeanne M. Logsdon & Donna J. Wood - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):55-67.
    This article describes the theory and process of global business citizenship (GBC) and applies it in an analysis of characteristics of company codes of business conduct. GBC is distinguished from a commonly used term, “corporate citizenship,” which often denotes corporate community involvement and philanthropy. The GBC process requires (1) a set of fundamental values embedded in the corporate code of conduct and in corporate policies that reflect universal ethical standards; (2) implementation throughout the organization with thoughtful awareness (...)
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  16.  42
    Dual-Use Research Codes of Conduct: Lessons From the Life Sciences. [REVIEW]Michael J. Selgelid - 2009 - NanoEthics 3 (3):175-183.
    This paper considers multiple meanings of the expression ‘dual use’ and examines lessons to be learned from the life sciences when considering ethical and policy issues associated with the dual-use nature of nanotechnology (and converging technologies). After examining recent controversial dual-use experiments in the life sciences, it considers the potential roles and limitations of science codes of conduct for addressing concerns associated with dual-use science and technology. It concludes that, rather than being essentially associated with voluntary self-governance of (...)
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  17.  35
    Stakeholder Pressures as Determinants of CSR Strategic Choice: Why Do Firms Choose Symbolic Versus Substantive Self-Regulatory Codes of Conduct[REVIEW]Luis A. Perez-Batres, Jonathan P. Doh, Van V. Miller & Michael J. Pisani - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (2):157-172.
    To encourage corporations to contribute positively to the environment in which they operate, voluntary self-regulatory codes (SRC) have been enacted and refined over the past 15 years. Two of the most prominent are the United Nations Global Compact and the Global Reporting Initiative. In this paper, we explore the impact of different stakeholders' pressures on the selection of strategic choices to join SRCs. Our results show that corporations react differently to different sets of stakeholder pressures and that the SRC (...)
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  18.  33
    An Analysis of International Accounting Codes of Conduct.Curtis Clements, John D. Neill & O. Scott Stovall - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):173 - 183.
    The International Federation of Accountants (IFAC) has recently issued a revised "Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants" (IFAC Code). As a requirement for membership in IFAC, a national accounting organization must either adopt the IFAC Code or adopt a code of conduct that is not "less stringent" than the IFAC Code. In this paper, we examine the extent to which 158 national accounting organizations have adopted the revised IFAC Code as their own. Our results indicate that 80 of our (...)
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  19. Ethical Codes of Conduct and Organizational Context: A Study of the Relationship Between Codes of Conduct, Employee Behavior and Organizational Values. [REVIEW]Mark John Somers - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 30 (2):185-195.
    Codes of ethics are being increasingly adopted in organizations worldwide, yet their effects on employee perceptions and behavior have not been thoroughly addressed. This study used a sample of 613 management accountants drawn from the United States to study the relationship between corporate and professional codes of ethics and employee attitudes and behaviors. The presence of corporate codes of ethics was associated with less perceived wrongdoing in organizations, but not with an increased propensity to report observed unethical (...)
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  20.  56
    Ethical Codes of Conduct in Irish Companies: A Survey of Code Content and Enforcement Procedures.Brendan O’Dwyer & Grainne Madden - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 63 (3):217-236.
    This paper reports on an investigation of issues surrounding the use of ethical codes/codes of conduct in Irish based companies. Using a comprehensive questionnaire survey, the paper examines the incidence, content and enforcement of codes of conduct among a sample of the top 1000 companies based in Ireland. The main findings indicate that the overall usage of codes of conduct amongst indigenous Irish companies has increased significantly from 1995 to 2000. However, in line (...)
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  21.  31
    Evaluating Strategies for Negotiating Workers' Rights in Transnational Corporations: The Effects of Codes of Conduct and Global Agreements on Workplace Democracy. [REVIEW]Niklas Egels-Zandén & Peter Hyllman - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (2):207 - 223.
    Following the offshoring of production to developing countries by transnational corporations (TNCs), unions and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) have criticised working conditions at TNCs' offshore factories. This has led to the emergence of two different approaches to operationalising TNC responsibilities for workers' rights in developing countries: codes of conduct and global agreements. Despite the importance of this development, few studies have systematically compared the effects of these two different ways of dealing with workers' rights. This article addresses this gap (...)
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  22.  70
    The Role of Professional Codes in Regarding Ethical Conduct.Nicola Higgs-Kleyn & Dimitri Kapelianis - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 19 (4):363 - 374.
    This paper investigates the regulation of ethical behavior of professionals. Ethical perceptions of South African professionals operating in the business community (specifically accountants, lawyers and engineers) concerning their need for and awareness of professional codes, and the frequency and acceptability of peer contravention of such codes were sought. The existence of conflict between corporate codes and professional codes was also investigated. Results, based on 217 replies, indicated that the professionals believe that codes are necessary and (...)
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  23.  15
    Dressing Up for Diffusion: Codes of Conduct in the German Textile and Apparel Industry, 1997–2010.Florian Scheiber - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (4):559-580.
    I study the diffusion of codes of conduct in the German textile and apparel industry between 1997 and 2010. Using a longitudinal case study design, I aim to understand how the diffusion of this practice was affected by the way important “infomediaries”—a trade journal and a professional association—shaped its understanding within the industry. My results show that time-consuming processes of meaning reconstruction by these infomediaries temporarily hampered but finally facilitated the broader material diffusion of codes of (...) within the industry. These findings detail existing conceptualizations of code diffusion as they demonstrate how infomediaries—through creation, use, and reconstruction of explanatory accounts as well as frames of reference—participate in defining the relevance and meaning of CSR practices. I move beyond prior empirical work as I explicitly assess not only processes of meaning construction evolving around a CSR practice but also how these processes over time coincide with quantitative patterns of its material diffusion. Implications of my findings for existing research on the diffusion of codes of conduct specifically and CSR practices in general as well as for conceptualizations of diffusion from institutional theory are discussed. (shrink)
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  24.  58
    Child Labor and Multinational Conduct: A Comparison of International Business Andstakeholder Codes[REVIEW]Ans Kolk & Rob van Tuldere - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 36 (3):291-301.
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  25.  37
    A Cross-Country Comparison of the Codes of Professional Conduct of Certified/Chartered Accountants.S. T. Jakubowski, P. Chao, S. K. Huh & S. Maheshwari - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 35 (2):111 - 129.
    This research examines the extent to which similarities and differences exist in the codes of professional conduct of certified (chartered) accountants across the following countries: the United States, Taiwan, South Korea, Malaysia, Ontario (Canada), Australia, India, and Hong Kong. These eight countries exemplify some of the diversity in economic, political, legal, and cultural environments in which public accountants practice. The professional codes of ethics establish the ethical boundary parameters within which professional accountants must operate and they are (...)
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  26.  43
    Measuring the Implementation of Codes of Conduct. An Assessment Method Based on a Process Approach of the Responsible Organisation.André Nijhof, Stephan Cludts, Olaf Fisscher & Albertus Laan - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 45 (1-2):65 - 78.
    More and more organisations formulate a code of conduct in order to stimulate responsible behaviour among their members. Much time and energy is usually spent fixing the content of the code but many organisations get stuck in the challenge of implementing and maintaining the code. The code then turns into nothing else than the notorious "paper in the drawer", without achieving its aims. The challenge of implementation is to utilize the dynamics which have emerged from the formulation of the (...)
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  27.  10
    Suppliers’ Compliance with MNCs’ Codes of Conduct: Behind the Scenes at Chinese Toy Suppliers.Niklas Egels-Zandén - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 75 (1):45-62.
    Despite increased academic and practitioner interest in codes of conduct, there has been little research into the actual compliance of suppliers in developing countries with the codes of conduct of multinational corporations. This paper addresses this lack by analysing Chinese suppliers' level of compliance with Swedish toy retailers' codes of conduct. Based on unannounced and unofficial interviews with employees of Chinese suppliers, the study shows that all of the nine studied suppliers breached some of (...)
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  28.  13
    Evaluating Strategies for Negotiating Workers’ Rights in Transnational Corporations: The Effects of Codes of Conduct and Global Agreements on Workplace Democracy.Niklas Egels-Zandén & Peter Hyllman - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (2):207-223.
    Following the offshoring of production to developing countries by transnational corporations, unions and non-governmental organisations have criticised working conditions at TNCs' offshore factories. This has led to the emergence of two different approaches to operationalising TNC responsibilities for workers' rights in developing countries: codes of conduct and global agreements. Despite the importance of this development, few studies have systematically compared the effects of these two different ways of dealing with workers' rights. This article addresses this gap by analysing (...)
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  29.  17
    E Pluribus Unum? Legitimacy Issues and Multi-Stakeholder Codes of Conduct.Valentina Mele & Donald H. Schepers - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (3):561-576.
    Regulatory schema has shifted from government to governance-based systems. One particular form that has emerged at the international level is the multi-stakeholder voluntary code of conduct (MSVC). We argue that such codes are not only simply mechanisms by which various stakeholders attempt to govern the action of the corporation but also systems by which each stakeholder attempts to gain or retain some legitimacy goal. Each stakeholder is motivated by strategic legitimacy goal to join the code, and once a (...)
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  30.  51
    Corporate Social Responsibility in Transnational Spaces: Exploring Influences of Varieties of Capitalism on Expressions of Corporate Codes of Conduct in Nigeria.Kenneth Amaeshi & Olufemi O. Amao - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (S2):225-239.
    Drawing from the varieties of capitalism theoretical framework, the study explores the home country influences of multinational corporations on their corporate social responsibility practices when they operate outside their national/regional institutional contexts. The study focusses on a particular CSR practice of seven MNCs from three varieties of capitalism – coordinated, mixed and liberal market economies – operating in the oil and gas sector of the Nigerian economy. The study concludes that the corporate codes of conduct of these MNCs (...)
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  31. Globalization and Self-Regulation: The Crucial Role That Corporate Codes of Conduct Play in Global Business.S. Prakash Sethi (ed.) - 2011 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    It is imperative for the business community to act now to create global, industry-wide standards of conduct. Corporate strategy expert S. Prakash Sethi along with notable experts on issues of global codes of conduct take an in-depth look at global structures and how regulation works from a corporate perspective, providing case studies of several industries and governments who have begun implementing voluntary codes of conducts, including Equator Principles, ICMM, and The Kimberly Process._ He assesses the many (...)
     
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  32.  51
    What's Wrong with the Treadway Commission Report? Experimental Analyses of the Effects of Personal Values and Codes of Conduct on Fraudulent Financial Reporting.Arthur P. Brief, Janet M. Dukerich, Paul R. Brown & Joan F. Brett - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (2):183 - 198.
    In three studies, factors influencing the incidence of fraudulent financial reporting were assessed. We examined (1) the effects of personal values and (2) codes of corporate conduct, on whether managers misrepresented financial reports. In these studies, executives and controllers were asked to respond to hypothetical situations involving fraudulent financial reporting procedures. The occurrence of fraudulent reporting was found to be high; however, neither personal values, codes of conduct, nor the interaction of the two factors played a (...)
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  33.  67
    The Influence of Collegiate and Corporate Codes of Conduct on Ethics-Related Behavior in the Workplace.Kenneth D. Butterfield - 1996 - Business Ethics Quarterly 6 (4):461-476.
    Codes of conduct are viewed here as a community’s attempt to communicate its expectations and standards of ethical behavior. Many organizations are implementing codes, but empirical support for the relationship between such codes and employee conduct is lacking. We investigated the long term effects of a collegiate honor code experience as well as the effects of corporate ethics codes on unethical behavior in the workplace by surveying alumni from an honor code and a non-honor (...)
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  34. The Role of Professional Societies: Codes of Conduct and Their Enforcement.Stephanie J. Bird - 1998 - Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (3):315-320.
    In discussions of professional standards and ethical values it is reasonable to consider who will develop the codes of conduct and guidelines for behavior that will reflect the standards and values of the community. Also worthy of consideration is whether the standards or guidelines are enforceable, and how and to what extent they will be enforced. The development of guidelines or professional codes of conduct is a responsibility that has been adopted by many professional societies. Useful (...)
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  35.  54
    A Human Rights Approach to Developing Voluntary Codes of Conduct for Multinational Corporations.Tom Campbell - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (2):255-270.
    Abstract: The criticism that voluntary codes of conduct are ineffective can be met by giving greater centrality to human rights in such codes. Provided the human rights obligations of multinational corporations are interpreted as moral obligations specifically tailored to the situation of multinational corporations, this could serve to bring powerful moral force to bear on MNCs and could provide a legitimating basis for NGO monitoring and persuasion. Approached in this way the human rights obligations of MNCs can (...)
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  36.  55
    Improving Case-Based Ethics Training with Codes of Conduct and Forecasting Content.Lauren N. Harkrider, Chase E. Thiel, Zhanna Bagdasarov, Michael D. Mumford, James F. Johnson, Shane Connelly & Lynn D. Devenport - 2012 - Ethics and Behavior 22 (4):258 - 280.
    Although case-based training is popular for ethics education, little is known about how specific case content influences training effectiveness. Therefore, the effects of (a) codes of ethical conduct and (b) forecasting content were investigated. Results revealed richer cases, including both codes and forecasting content, led to increased knowledge acquisition, greater sensemaking strategy use, and better decision ethicality. With richer cases, a specific pattern emerged. Specifically, content describing codes alone was more effective when combined with short-term forecasts, (...)
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  37.  60
    International Codes of Conduct: An Analysis of Ethical Reasoning. [REVIEW]Kathleen A. Getz - 1990 - Journal of Business Ethics 9 (7):567 - 577.
    Four international codes of conduct (those of the International Chamber of Commerce, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the International Labor Organization, and the United Nations Commission on Transnational Corporations) are analyzed to determine the ethical bases of the behaviors they prescribe for multinational enterprises (MNEs). Although the four codes emphasize different aspects of business behavior, there is substantial agreement regarding many of the moral duties of MNEs. It is suggested that MNEs are morally bound to (...)
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  38.  14
    Ethical Codes of Conduct: Deficient in Guidance for the Canadian Accounting Profession. [REVIEW]Leonard J. Brooks - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (5):325 - 335.
    Current trends toward increased pace, more complex substance and lower tolerance of error have caused the financial marketplace to rely more heavily on the integrity of financial data and, therefore, of those who prepare the financial statements. At the same time, these trends place higher challenges before professional accountants and it is essential that they have excellent ethical guidance to live up to modern expectations. However, in view of the current codes of conduct, an accountant may not have (...)
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  39.  35
    Self-Regulating Industry Behavior: Antitrust Limitations and Trade Association Codes of Conduct[REVIEW]Thomas A. Hemphill - 1992 - Journal of Business Ethics 11 (12):915 - 920.
    Self-regulation exists at the firm-level, the industry-level, and the business-level of economic organization. Industry self-regulation has faced economic (free rider) and legal (antitrust) impediments to widespread implementation, although there exist examples of effective industry self-regulation, e.g., securities industry and the SEC, advertising and the FTC. By instituting industry codes of conduct, national trade associations have shown to be natural vehicles for self-regulation. While there has been long-standing general encouragement for establishing industry codes, adopting and enforcing conduct (...)
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  40.  4
    Migration Intermediaries and Codes of Conduct: Temporary Migrant Workers in Australian Horticulture.Malcolm Rimmer, Diane Broek, Dimitria Groutsis & Elsa Underhill - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (3):675-689.
    Over recent decades, developments in network governance have seen governments around the world cede considerable authority and responsibility to commercial migration intermediaries for recruiting and managing temporary migrant labour. Correspondingly, a by-product of network governance has been the emergence of soft employment regulation in which voluntary codes of conduct supplement hard legal employment standards. This paper explores these developments in the context of temporary migrant workers employed in Australian horticulture. First the paper analyses the growing use of temporary (...)
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  41.  2
    Migration Intermediaries and Codes of Conduct: Temporary Migrant Workers in Australian Horticulture.Elsa Underhill, Dimitria Groutsis, Diane van den Broek & Malcolm Rimmer - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (3):675-689.
    Over recent decades, developments in network governance have seen governments around the world cede considerable authority and responsibility to commercial migration intermediaries for recruiting and managing temporary migrant labour. Correspondingly, a by-product of network governance has been the emergence of soft employment regulation in which voluntary codes of conduct supplement hard legal employment standards. This paper explores these developments in the context of temporary migrant workers employed in Australian horticulture. First the paper analyses the growing use of temporary (...)
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  42.  11
    Corporate Codes of Conduct in India.S. Elankumaran - 2006 - Journal of Human Values 12 (1):65-80.
    Codes of conduct play an important role in a corporation's effort to institutionalize ethics. The imperative of their implementation and compliance has been widely recognized by corporations across the world. Given this backdrop, a survey has been conducted in India to ascertain: how many corporations have codes of conduct; whether common ethical issues/themes exist among them; whether they have proper ‘ethics management systems’ in place; and whether codes of conduct reflect any distinctive national character. (...)
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  43.  4
    A Critical Reflection on Codes of Conduct in Vocational Education.Richard G. Bagnall & Sonal Nakar - 2018 - Journal of Moral Education 47 (1):78-90.
    The contemporary cultural context may be seen as presenting a moral void in vocational education, sanctioning the ascendency of instrumental epistemology and a proliferation of codes of conduct, to which workplace actions are expected to conform. Important among the purposes of such codes is that of encouraging ethical conduct, but, true to their informing instrumental epistemology, they tend to assume that ethical conduct is a formal matter: a priori, extrinsic, deductive, universal, determinate, unproblematic, incontestable, constraining (...)
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  44.  25
    Triple Bottom-Line Reporting as Social Grammar: Integrating Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Codes of Conduct.Mollie Painter-Morland - 2006 - Business Ethics 15 (4):352–364.
    This paper argues that many objections against, and limitations of, corporate codes of conduct can be addressed if a meaningful integration can be established between CSR and ethics management practices within corporations. It is proposed that the notion of the triple bottom‐line finally presents corporations with a mechanism to establish this integration. The paper draws on the second South African King Report on Corporate Governance, which succeeded in integrating corporate governance, ethics management and triple bottom‐line reporting by advocating (...)
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  45.  23
    Voluntary Codes of Conduct for Multinational Corporations: Coordinating Duties of Rescue and Justice.Nien-hê Hsieh - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (2):119-136.
    Abstract: This paper examines the extent to which the voluntary adoption of codes of conduct by multinational corporations (MNCs) renders MNCs accountable for the performance of actions specified in a code of conduct. In particular, the paper examines the ways in which codes of conduct coordinate the expectations of relevant parties with regard to the provision of assistance by MNCs on grounds of rescue or justice. The paper argues that this coordinative role of codes (...)
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  46.  38
    Are Codes of Conduct in Global Supply Chains Really Voluntary? From Soft Law Regulation of Labour Relations to Consumer Law.André Sobczak - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (2):167-184.
    Abstract: Labour and employment law no longer has a monopoly on regulating labour relations and is facing a crisis as its effectiveness is questioned. Codes of conduct adopted by companies to recognise their social responsibility for the global supply chain are instruments that can usefully complement labour and employment law. The aim of this paper is to analyse in depth the legal nature of codes of conduct and their impact on labour and employment law. Will the (...)
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  47.  16
    Voluntary Codes of Conduct for Multinational Corporations: Coordinating Duties of Rescue and Justice.Nien-hê Hsieh - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (2):119-135.
    This paper examines the extent to which the voluntary adoption of codes of conduct by multinational corporations rendersMNCs accountable for the performance of actions specified in a code of conduct. In particular, the paper examines the ways in which codes of conduct coordinate the expectations of relevant parties with regard to the provision of assistance by MNCs on grounds of rescue or justice. The paper argues that this coordinative role of codes of conduct (...)
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  48.  33
    Using Ethical Reasoning to Amplify the Reach and Resonance of Professional Codes of Conduct in Training Big Data Scientists.Rochelle E. Tractenberg, Andrew J. Russell, Gregory J. Morgan, Kevin T. FitzGerald, Jeff Collmann, Lee Vinsel, Michael Steinmann & Lisa M. Dolling - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (6):1485-1507.
    The use of Big Data—however the term is defined—involves a wide array of issues and stakeholders, thereby increasing numbers of complex decisions around issues including data acquisition, use, and sharing. Big Data is becoming a significant component of practice in an ever-increasing range of disciplines; however, since it is not a coherent “discipline” itself, specific codes of conduct for Big Data users and researchers do not exist. While many institutions have created, or will create, training opportunities to prepare (...)
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  49.  4
    A Human Rights Approach to Developing Voluntary Codes of Conduct for Multinational Corporations.Tom Campbell - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (2):255-269.
    The criticism that voluntary codes of conduct are ineffective can be met by giving greater centrality to human rights in such codes.Provided the human rights obligations of multinational corporations are interpreted as moral obligations specifically tailored to the situation of multinational corporations, this could serve to bring powerful moral force to bear on MNCs and could provide a legitimating basis for NGO monitoring and persuasion. Approached in this way the human rights obligations of MNCs can be taken (...)
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    The Internal Significance of Codes of Conduct in Retail Companies.Magnus Frostenson, Sven Helin & Johan Sandström - 2012 - Business Ethics 21 (3):263-275.
    This paper focuses on the significance of codes of conduct (CoCs) in the internal work context of two retail companies. A stepwise approach is used. First, the paper identifies in what way employees use and refer to CoCs internally. Second, the function and relevance of CoCs inside the two companies are identified. Third, the paper explains why CoCs tend to function in the identified ways. In both cases, the CoCs are clearly decoupled in the sense that they do (...)
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