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David R. Cerbone [31]David Ralph Cerbone [1]
  1. Heidegger and Dasein’s ‘Bodily Nature’: What is the Hidden Problematic?David R. Cerbone - 2000 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 8 (2):209 – 230.
    In Being and Time, Heidegger explicitly defers any consideration of ourselves (Dasein) as embodied. I try to account for Heidegger's reluctance to talk about 'the body' in connection with his explication of Dasein, by arguing that doing so would be at odds with the kind of investigation his 'phenomenology of everydayness' is meant to be. That Heidegger omits discussion of the body in Being and Time might lead one to think of the human body in terms of the other categories (...)
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  2.  39
    Phenomenological Method: Reflection, Introspection, and Skepticism.David R. Cerbone - 2012 - In Dan Zahavi (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Phenomenology. Oxford University Press.
    Scepticism about phenomenology typically begins with worries concerning the reliability of introspection. Such worries concern the accuracy or fidelity of descriptions of experience to the experience itself, although if pressed, such worries ultimately call into question the very idea of the experience itself. This chapter considers scepticism in both its epistemological and ontological varieties and questions whether either form genuinely engages phenomenological method, properly understood. Starting from the problematic identification of phenomenology with introspection and drawing upon considerations from the work (...)
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  3. Understanding Phenomenology.David R. Cerbone - 2006 - Routledge.
    "Understanding Phenomenology" provides a guide to one of the most important schools of thought in modern philosophy. The book traces phenomenology's historical development, beginning with its founder, Edmund Husserl and his "pure" or "transcendental" phenomenology, and continuing with the later, "existential" phenomenology of Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. The book also assesses later, critical responses to phenomenology - from Derrida to Dennett - as well as the continued significance of phenomenology for philosophy today. Written for anyone coming to (...)
     
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  4.  28
    Exile and Return: From Phenomenology to Naturalism.David R. Cerbone - 2016 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 24 (3):365-380.
    Naturalism in twentieth century philosophy is founded on the rejection of ‘first philosophy’, as can be seen in Quine’s rejection of what he calls ‘cosmic exile’. Husserl’s transcendental phenomenology falls within the scope of what naturalism rejects, but I argue that the opposition between phenomenology and naturalism is less straightforward than it appears. This is so not because transcendental phenomenology does not involve a problematic form of exile, but because naturalism, in its recoil from transcendental philosophy, creates a new form (...)
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  5.  77
    Heidegger, Language, and World-Disclosure.David R. Cerbone - 2003 - Mind 112 (446):355-358.
  6.  48
    Composition and Constitution: Heidegger’s Hammer.David R. Cerbone - 1999 - Philosophical Topics 27 (2):309-329.
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  7.  3
    The Pursuit of an Authentic Philosophy: Wittgenstein, Heidegger, and the Everyday. David Egan. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2019. 272 Pp. ISBN: 9780198832638, Hb £55.00. [REVIEW]David R. Cerbone - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (3):810-814.
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  8. How To Do Things With Wood: Wittgenstein, Frege, and the Problem of Illogical Thought.David R. Cerbone - 2000 - In Alice Crary & Rupert J. Read (eds.), The New Wittgenstein. Routledge. pp. 293--314.
     
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  9.  37
    Zahavi’s Husserl and the Legacy of Phenomenology: A Critical Notice of Husserl’s Legacy: Phenomenology, Metaphysics, and Transcendental Philosophy, by Dan Zahavi.David R. Cerbone - 2020 - Mind 129 (514):603-620.
    As the title – Husserl’s Legacy – and subtitle – Phenomenology, Metaphysics, and Transcendental Philosophy – make clear, Dan Zahavi’s new book is centrally concerned with developing and defending a particular account of Husserl’s legacy. Rather than tracing lines of influence or measuring the impact of various of Husserl’s ideas, Zahavi is interested in Husserl’s legacy in a different and more demanding sense that pertains to what he refers to as ‘the overarching aims and ambitions of Husserlian phenomenology’. He is (...)
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  10.  40
    Composition and Constitution.David R. Cerbone - 1999 - Philosophical Topics 27 (2):309-329.
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  11.  43
    Don't Look but Think: Imaginary Scenarios in Wittgenstein's Later Philosophy.David R. Cerbone - 1994 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 37 (2):159 – 183.
    David Bloor has claimed that Wittgenstein is best read as offering the beginnings of a sociological theory of knowledge, despite Wittgenstein's reluctance to view his work this way. This leads him to dismiss Wittgenstein's many self?characterizations as mere ?prejudice?. In doing so, however, Bloor misses the import of Wittgenstein's work as a ?grammatical investigation?. The problems inherent in Bloor's interpretative approach can be discerned in his attitude toward Wittgenstein's use of imaginary scenarios: he demands that they be replaced by real (...)
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  12.  55
    World, World‐Entry, and Realism in Early Heidegger.David R. Cerbone - 1995 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 38 (4):401 – 421.
    Interpretations of Heidegger's Being and Time have tended to founder on the question of whether he is in the end a realist or an idealist, in part because of Heidegger's own rather enigmatic remarks on the subject. Many have thus depicted him as being in some way ambivalent, and so as holding on to an unstable combination of the two opposing positions. Recently, William Blattner has explained the apparent ambivalence by appealing to Kant's transcendental/empirical distinction. Although an ingenious reading of (...)
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  13. Phenomenology : Straight and Hetero.David R. Cerbone - 2003 - In C. G. Prado (ed.), A House Divided: Comparing Analytic and Continental Philosophy. Humanity Books.
  14. The Limits of Conservatism: Wittgenstein on ''Our Life''and ''Our Concepts''.David R. Cerbone - 2003 - In Cressida J. Heyes (ed.), The Grammar of Politics: Wittgenstein and Political Philosophy. Cornell University Press.
     
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  15. Wittgenstein and Idealism.David R. Cerbone - 2011 - In Marie McGinn & Oskari Kuusela (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Wittgenstein. Oxford University Press.
     
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  16.  3
    All Souls: Wittgenstein and ‘Eine Einstellung Zur Seele’.David R. Cerbone - 2019 - In Joel Backström, Hannes Nykänen, Niklas Toivakainen & Thomas Wallgren (eds.), Moral Foundations of Philosophy of Mind. Springer Verlag. pp. 129-158.
    This chapter explores Wittgenstein’s contrast between attitudes and opinions in characterizing my relation toward the other as ensouled. I begin with what I call a privileging reading, which accords to the notion of attitude a kind of depth in relation to opinions. On this reading, the attitude Wittgenstein gestures toward provides the backdrop for the kinds of opinions that make sense in my relation to the other. Read with only a slight shift of emphasis, Wittgenstein’s remark allows for a similar (...)
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  17.  17
    Distance and Proximity in Phenomenology.David R. Cerbone - 2003 - New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 3:1-26.
  18.  12
    Distance and Proximity in Phenomenology: Husserl and Heidegger.David R. Cerbone - 2003 - New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 3:1-26.
  19.  12
    Essay Review: Social Epistemology Meets Heideggerian Ontology.David R. Cerbone - 2019 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 76:94-97.
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  20.  20
    Making Sense of Phenomenological Sense-Making.David R. Cerbone - 2015 - Philosophical Topics 43 (1-2):253-268.
    This paper examines Moore’s account of Husserl in chapter 17 of The Evolution of Modern Metaphysics. I consider in particular the threat of a gap between natural sense-making, which takes place within what Husserl calls the “natural attitude,” and phenomenological sense-making, which is made from within the perspective afforded by the phenomenological reduction. Moore’s concerns are an echo, I suggest, of the radical account of Husserlian phenomenology developed by Husserl’s student and final assistant, Eugen Fink, in his Sixth Cartesian Meditation. (...)
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  21.  1
    “Life is Very Complicated”: Remarks on a Recurring Adjective.David R. Cerbone - 2020 - In Shyam Wuppuluri & Newton da Costa (eds.), Wittgensteinian : Looking at the World From the Viewpoint of Wittgenstein's Philosophy. Springer Verlag. pp. 135-149.
    In this paper, I examine Wittgenstein’s frequent and pervasive of the adjective “complicated.” I begin by comparing and contrasting the adjective’s use in the Tractatus and the much later manuscripts on the philosophy of psychology. While there are a number of important and illuminating affinities between these uses, I argue that these need to be balanced against the wide disparities between them: in contrast to the Tractatus, the later philosophy preserves a sense of “surface” complexity while jettisoning the idea of (...)
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  22.  1
    “Life is Very Complicated”: Remarks on a Recurring Adjective.David R. Cerbone - 2020 - In A. C. Grayling, Shyam Wuppuluri, Christopher Norris, Nikolay Milkov, Oskari Kuusela, Danièle Moyal-Sharrock, Beth Savickey, Jonathan Beale, Duncan Pritchard, Annalisa Coliva, Jakub Mácha, David R. Cerbone, Paul Horwich, Michael Nedo, Gregory Landini, Pascal Zambito, Yoshihiro Maruyama, Chon Tejedor, Susan G. Sterrett, Carlo Penco, Susan Edwards-Mckie, Lars Hertzberg, Edward Witherspoon, Michel ter Hark, Paul F. Snowdon, Rupert Read, Nana Last, Ilse Somavilla & Freeman Dyson (eds.), Wittgensteinian : Looking at the World From the Viewpoint of Wittgenstein’s Philosophy. Springer Verlag. pp. 135-149.
    In this paper, I examine Wittgenstein’s frequent and pervasive of the adjective “complicated.” I begin by comparing and contrasting the adjective’s use in the Tractatus and the much later manuscripts on the philosophy of psychology. While there are a number of important and illuminating affinities between these uses, I argue that these need to be balanced against the wide disparities between them: in contrast to the Tractatus, the later philosophy preserves a sense of “surface” complexity while jettisoning the idea of (...)
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  23.  34
    Review of Anthony Kenny, Philosophy in the Modern World: A New History of Western Philosophy, Volume 4[REVIEW]David R. Cerbone - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (3).
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  24.  24
    Review of Don Ihde, (Book 1) Ironic Technics; (Book 2) Postphenomenology and Technoscience: The Peking University Lectures[REVIEW]David R. Cerbone - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (10).
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  25. Gordon CF Bearn, Waking to Wonder: Wittgenstein's Existential Investigations Reviewed By.David R. Cerbone - 1998 - Philosophy in Review 18 (1):3-5.
     
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  26.  7
    Heidegger, Language, and World‐disclosure. [REVIEW]David R. Cerbone - 2003 - Mind 112 (446):355-358.
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  27.  16
    Mind in Action.David R. Cerbone - 2000 - International Philosophical Quarterly 40 (1):114-115.
  28.  14
    Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Andrew P. Mills, Marek McGann, James G. Murphy, David R. Cerbone & Tsarina Doyle - 2006 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (4):597 – 620.
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  29.  4
    Heidegger and the Measure of Truth, by Denis McManus. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, 272 Pp. ISBN 978‐0‐19‐969487‐7 £42. [REVIEW]David R. Cerbone - 2014 - European Journal of Philosophy 22 (S2):e5-e10.
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  30. Ef)Facing the Soul: Wittgenstein and Materialism.David R. Cerbone - 2010 - In William Day & Víctor J. Krebs (eds.), Seeing Wittgenstein Anew. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  31.  27
    Wittgensteinian : Looking at the World From the Viewpoint of Wittgenstein’s Philosophy.A. C. Grayling, Shyam Wuppuluri, Christopher Norris, Nikolay Milkov, Oskari Kuusela, Danièle Moyal-Sharrock, Beth Savickey, Jonathan Beale, Duncan Pritchard, Annalisa Coliva, Jakub Mácha, David R. Cerbone, Paul Horwich, Michael Nedo, Gregory Landini, Pascal Zambito, Yoshihiro Maruyama, Chon Tejedor, Susan G. Sterrett, Carlo Penco, Susan Edwards-Mckie, Lars Hertzberg, Edward Witherspoon, Michel ter Hark, Paul F. Snowdon, Rupert Read, Nana Last, Ilse Somavilla & Freeman Dyson (eds.) - 2020 - Springer Verlag.
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