Results for 'Taras S. Kudryk'

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  1.  13
    The Mathematical Intelligencer Flunks the Olympics.Alexander E. Gutman, Mikhail G. Katz, Taras S. Kudryk & Semen S. Kutateladze - 2017 - Foundations of Science 22 (3):539-555.
    The Mathematical Intelligencer recently published a note by Y. Sergeyev that challenges both mathematics and intelligence. We examine Sergeyev’s claims concerning his purported Infinity computer. We compare his grossone system with the classical Levi-Civita fields and with the hyperreal framework of A. Robinson, and analyze the related algorithmic issues inevitably arising in any genuine computer implementation. We show that Sergeyev’s grossone system is unnecessary and vague, and that whatever consistent subsystem could be salvaged is subsumed entirely within a stronger and (...)
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  2.  20
    A Non-Standard Analysis of a Cultural Icon: The Case of Paul Halmos.Piotr Błaszczyk, Alexandre Borovik, Vladimir Kanovei, Mikhail G. Katz, Taras Kudryk, Semen S. Kutateladze & David Sherry - 2016 - Logica Universalis 10 (4):393-405.
    We examine Paul Halmos’ comments on category theory, Dedekind cuts, devil worship, logic, and Robinson’s infinitesimals. Halmos’ scepticism about category theory derives from his philosophical position of naive set-theoretic realism. In the words of an MAA biography, Halmos thought that mathematics is “certainty” and “architecture” yet 20th century logic teaches us is that mathematics is full of uncertainty or more precisely incompleteness. If the term architecture meant to imply that mathematics is one great solid castle, then modern logic tends to (...)
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  3.  27
    Toward a Clarity of the Extreme Value Theorem.Karin U. Katz, Mikhail G. Katz & Taras Kudryk - 2014 - Logica Universalis 8 (2):193-214.
    We apply a framework developed by C. S. Peirce to analyze the concept of clarity, so as to examine a pair of rival mathematical approaches to a typical result in analysis. Namely, we compare an intuitionist and an infinitesimal approaches to the extreme value theorem. We argue that a given pre-mathematical phenomenon may have several aspects that are not necessarily captured by a single formalisation, pointing to a complementarity rather than a rivalry of the approaches.
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  4. Is Leibnizian Calculus Embeddable in First Order Logic?Piotr Błaszczyk, Vladimir Kanovei, Karin U. Katz, Mikhail G. Katz, Taras Kudryk, Thomas Mormann & David Sherry - 2017 - Foundations of Science 22 (4):73 - 88.
    To explore the extent of embeddability of Leibnizian infinitesimal calculus in first-order logic (FOL) and modern frameworks, we propose to set aside ontological issues and focus on pro- cedural questions. This would enable an account of Leibnizian procedures in a framework limited to FOL with a small number of additional ingredients such as the relation of infinite proximity. If, as we argue here, first order logic is indeed suitable for developing modern proxies for the inferential moves found in Leibnizian infinitesimal (...)
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  5. The Reconstruction of Christian Theodicy in Taras Shevchenko’s Poetry.Olha Bihun - 2019 - Kyiv-Mohyla Humanities Journal 6:161-176.
    This article focuses on the role of Christian theodicy in Taras Shevchenko’s works. With a biography marked by trauma and suffering, it is no wonder that Shevchenko orients his poetic worldview in search of understanding the nature of evil and human suffering. Operating through a Christological model, Shevchenko arrives at a poetics based on theodicy, as a means of understanding suffering in the world. He analyses the problem of evil associated with the phenomenology of suffering within the framework of (...)
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  6. Nietzsche’s philosophy as a creation of concepts (XVI Kyiv-Mohyla Seminar on the History of Philosophy).Тaras Lyuty, Mykhailo Minakov, Vakhtang Kebuladze & Vadym Menzhulin - 2018 - Наукові Записки Наукма. Філософія Та Релігієзнавство 1:91-105.
    Kyiv-Mohyla Seminar on the History of Philosophy was established by the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy’s Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies (in co-operation with Ukrainian Philosophical Foundation) in 2003. In this yearly seminar, the Department’s members as well as the historians of philosophy from other academic institutions regularly take part. Since 2003, 16 meetings of the seminar took place. They were focused on such topics as “Historiography of Philosophy in Ukraine: Current State and Perspectives” (2003), “Actual Problems of the Source Studies in (...)
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  7.  9
    Describing the Past: Tartu-Moscow School Ideas on History, Historiography, and the Historian's Craft.Taras Boyko - 2015 - Sign Systems Studies 43 (2/3):269-280.
    The article provides a survey of some milestone works of representatives of the Tartu-Moscow School focused on the topic of history, approaches to the past, historiographical strategies, the essence of the historian’s craft, etc. Although these topics associated with the problem of history for the most part remained marginal in the research agendas of the Tartu-Moscow School, still a number of scholars affiliated with the School voiced novel and interesting thoughts and proposals regarding history and the historian’s craft, and to (...)
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  8.  9
    On the Analysis of Power and Politics From the Perspective of Juri Lotman’s Semiotics of Culture.Andreas Ventsel & Taras Boyko - 2018 - Sign Systems Studies 46 (1):168-177.
    Review of Juri Lotman’s Cultural Semiotics and the Political [Series Reframing the Boundaries: Thinking the Political] by Andrey Makarychev and Alexandra Yatsyk. London: Rowman & Littlefield, 2017, 228 pp.
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  9.  13
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 1998 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 37 (2):3-5.
    Russian philosophers have always been interested in Descartes's thought and the philosophical movements, particularly the phenomeno-logical movement, which grew out of it. Some of them, notably Gustav Shpet and Murab Mamardashvili, were even influenced by and contributed to the development of transcendental phenomenology. Except for N. V. Motroshilova's paper, this issue deals with Descartes and the Cartesian tradition in modern philosophy rather than their influence in Russia. The articles presented here are recent studies by Russian philosophers of Descartes's ideas and (...)
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  10.  10
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2001 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 40 (3):3-3.
    There is one theme that appears in one way or another in all the selections of this issue—the role of the dialectic in A.F. Losev's early philosophical thought. The first selection—the last three chapters of Losev's The Dialectics of Myth—demonstrates his dialectical phenomenology at work: chapter 12 defines myth by negation, by contrasting it with other related concepts, chapter 13 comes up with synthetic positive definitions, and chapter 14 looks forward to a dialectically constructed philosophical interpretation of the Orthodox faith. (...)
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  11.  9
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 1999 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 37 (4):4-5.
    The first selection in this issue is the fullest available biography of G.G. Shpet. Written by his grandson, it is particularly interesting for its attempt to place Shpet in the social and cultural context of his time. There are a number of inaccuracies in it, to which Shpet's daughter by the second marriage, Marina Gustavovich Shtorkh, has drawn attention. Shpet's birthday is March 26, not 25 OS. Shpet's mother did not marry a distant relative; the boy was adopted by her (...)
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  12.  9
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2002 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 40 (4):3-5.
    Since perestroika, popular interest in the ideas of Pavel Florenskii has declined, but scholarly interest in them has increased steadily. In Russia an authoritative four-volume collection of his works came out in 1994-99 and a fifteen-volume collection has been planned. His largest and most important work, The Pillar and Ground of the Truth [Stolp i utverzhdenie istiny] was reprinted in Moscow in 1990 and was translated into English in 1997. An Italian translation has been available since 1974 and a French (...)
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  13.  8
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 1998 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 37 (1):4-8.
    Russia lacks a tradition of religious and political tolerance and the topic has been rarely discussed by Russian philosophers. The Philosophical Encyclopedia published in the Soviet period contains no entry on tolerance. It is only in the last few years, in the course of the larger discussion of Russia's place in the world, the distinctive character of its culture and history, and the direction of its future development that some thinkers have begun to raise the question of tolerance. The first (...)
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  14.  7
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 1999 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 38 (3):4-6.
    This issue is devoted to recent studies of Kant's philosophy in Russia. Russian Kant studies have a long and distinguished tradition: in the nineteenth century there was a strong Kantian current in Russian philosophy itself and in the Soviet period Kant was studied as the key figure in the development of German thought, which led to Marxism. The impact of German philosophy on Russian thought has been and, I think, continues to be greater than that of any other philosophical tradition. (...)
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  15.  7
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2001 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 39 (4):3-4.
    Since perestroika, Russian thinkers have joined the general discussion of the contemporary relevance of Marxism. In the last two decades, this debate has intensified in the West. According to one side, Marxism is intellectually and politically exhausted. It is a prime example of the grand narrative and the Enlightenment project. In practice it has proved to be not merely incapable of raising undeveloped societies out of poverty but immensely destructive: it has served as the ideological underpinning of the most totalitarian (...)
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  16.  7
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2003 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 42 (1):3-5.
    The historical turn in nineteenth-century philosophy, the recognition of the history of philosophy as an integral part of philosophy itself, gave rise to the study of ancient philosophy as a special philosophical discipline. The interest of Russian philosophers in ancient thought is attributable not only to the influence of German idealism but also to their rootedness in Orthodox theological thought, which is Platonic at its core. The earliest systematic studies of the ancient philosophers were written by professors at Kiev University (...)
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  17.  6
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2000 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 39 (2):3-5.
    In this issue, Russian philosophers look back at the seventy-year Soviet period of their discipline and try to sort out its main achievements, key turning points, and patterns of development. All of them realize that their involvement in the period that they are assessing—they were all recognized Soviet philosophers—and the temporal closeness of the period—only a decade has passed since the period's official ending—makes it impossible for them to offer anything more than subjectively tinted, tentative judgments. But at the same (...)
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  18.  6
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 1998 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 37 (3):4-7.
    In the last few decades we have become aware of the ecological problem, a problem of unprecedented scale and urgency. It consists of the danger that within our or the succeeding generation all life on earth, including the human species, will become extinct. This possibility rests on the one hand on the conspicuous changes in the global environment that are being effeted by human activity and, on the other, on a new physical theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. According to this discipline, (...)
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  19.  5
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2002 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 41 (3):3-6.
    In breadth and depth the influence of Nietzsche's ideas on Russian intellectual culture at the turn of the nineteenth century has no parallel in any other country and period. Ten years after the first critical article on Nietzsche appeared in a Russian philosophical journal, a nine-volume and a ten-volume collection of his translated works came out. In 1909 a full collection of his works in Russian translation was launched, but only four volumes were published when the project was discontinued in (...)
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  20.  4
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 1997 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):3-4.
    In the past decade, the philosophical scene in Russia has changed dramatically: it has become much more diverse, lively, and interesting. As a result, it is more difficult, but at the same time more important, to keep abreast of significant developments in Russian philosophy. As a journal of translations, Russian Studies in Philosophy plays a unique role in giving the English-language reader direct access to at least some of the serious philosophical work currently being done in Russia. I endorse the (...)
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  21.  8
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2006 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 45 (2):3-4.
    In the past decade, the philosophical scene in Russia has changed dramatically: it has become much more diverse, lively, and interesting. As a result, it is more difficult, but at the same time more important, to keep abreast of significant developments in Russian philosophy. As a journal of translations, Russian Studies in Philosophy plays a unique role in giving the English-language reader direct access to at least some of the serious philosophical work currently being done in Russia. I endorse the (...)
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  22.  1
    Philosophical Performance of Serhiy Kryms’Kyi. Kryms’Kyi, S. (2019). Selected Works in 4 Books. (T. Lyuty, Ed.). Kyiv: Alpha-PIC. [REVIEW]Taras Lyuty - 2020 - Sententiae 39 (1):185-190.
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  23.  2
    Ideological Zealots Fighting a Non-Existent Ukrainian Nationalist Enemy: A Reply to Tarik Amar’s Review of Red Famine.Taras Kuzio - 2019 - Kyiv-Mohyla Humanities Journal 6:209-216.
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  24.  13
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 1997 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 36 (2):3-5.
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  25.  9
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2007 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 46 (1):3-4.
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  26.  8
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2007 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 45 (3):3-5.
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  27.  8
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2002 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 41 (2):3-6.
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  28.  8
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2005 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 44 (4):3-4.
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  29.  8
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2007 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 45 (4):3-4.
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  30.  6
    Ideological Interpretations of Nietzsche’s Philosophical Views in the Ukrainian Cultural Context.Taras Lyuty - 2017 - Sententiae 36 (1):71-82.
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  31.  7
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2001 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 40 (2):3-4.
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  32.  6
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2000 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 39 (1):4-7.
    Nikolai Aleksandrovich Berdiaev is the twentieth-century Russian philosopher best known in the West. Upon his expulsion from Russia in 1922, he lived briefly in Berlin and then in Clamart, at the outskirts of Paris. He was personally acquainted not only with the leading Russian thinkers of his generation such as Lev Shestov, Petr Stuve, and Sergei Bulgakov, but also some important German and French philosophers such as Max Scheler, Gabriel Marcel, and Jacques Maritain. The works he considered to be his (...)
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  33.  6
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 1999 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 38 (2):4-7.
    The five selections in this issue deal with some of the most important and widely known Russian religious thinkers of the nineteenth century. Although this is not pointed out in any of the selections, it is an interesting fact that some of these thinkers were personally acquainted and discussed their ideas with each other. In the last few years of his life Fedor Dostoevsky was friends with young Vladimir Solov'ev and they discussed not only their own ideas but also those (...)
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  34.  6
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 1998 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 36 (4):3-5.
    For fifty years Voprosy filosofii has served as the chief vehicle of philosophical thought in the Soviet Union and post-Soviet Russia. During that time it has reflected the changes that occurred in the thinking of the philosophical community and at the same time has contributed to those changes. Its history, then, is an integral part of the development of Russian philosophy after World War II.
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  35.  6
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2005 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 44 (3):3-4.
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  36.  6
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2006 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 45 (1):3-5.
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  37.  6
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2007 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 46 (2):3-5.
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  38.  5
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2000 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 39 (3):3-5.
    Philosophical anthropology is a distinctive discipline established in the 1920s-30s by German thinkers. It arose as an attempt to integrate various philosophical methods and theories and to confirm the synthetic conception of man by scientific data from fields such as biology, psychology, ethnology, and sociology. The task was to use the ideas and information about man provided by religious and historical experience, philosophical speculation, and scientific research to develop a general theory of man that would be comprehensive enough to qualify (...)
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  39.  5
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2003 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 42 (3):3-4.
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  40.  5
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2002 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 41 (1):3-4.
    This issue is devoted to an area of philosophy that, under the Soviet regime, had been drained of intellectual vitality and is now beginning to show signs of life. The authors of our first two selections are the leading Russian specialists in the field of ethics and the editors of an encyclopedic dictionary of ethics, which, undoubtedly, will have a great impact on the further development of the field.
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  41.  5
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2003 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 42 (2):3-5.
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  42.  4
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2001 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 40 (1):3-5.
    This issue consists of a lengthy piece belonging to a genre that is rarely found in philosophical journals and was hardly conceivable in scholarly Soviet journals—an informal exploration of several loosely connected themes the purpose of which is to raise questions and stimulate thinking, rather than to offer answers. The author poses a number of important questions about knowledge and comments on some solutions proposed by other philosophers without attempting to make his survey exhaustive or to reach a definite conclusion. (...)
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  43.  4
    Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2004 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 42 (4):3-4.
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  44. Editor's Introduction.Taras Zakydalsky - 2005 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 43:3-5.
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  45. Salvaging Pascal’s Wager.Elizabeth Jackson & Andrew Rogers - 2019 - Philosophia Christi 21 (1):59-84.
    Many think that Pascal’s Wager is a hopeless failure. A primary reason for this is because a number of challenging objections have been raised to the wager, including the “many gods” objection and the “mixed strategy” objection. We argue that both objections are formal, but not substantive, problems for the wager, and that they both fail for the same reason. We then respond to additional objections to the wager. We show how a version of Pascalian reasoning succeeds, giving us a (...)
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  46. Prisoner's Dilemma Doesn't Explain Much.Robert Northcott & Anna Alexandrova - 2015 - In Martin Peterson (ed.), The Prisoner’s Dilemma. Classic philosophical arguments. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 64-84.
    We make the case that the Prisoner’s Dilemma, notwithstanding its fame and the quantity of intellectual resources devoted to it, has largely failed to explain any phenomena of social scientific or biological interest. In the heart of the paper we examine in detail a famous purported example of Prisoner’s Dilemma empirical success, namely Axelrod’s analysis of WWI trench warfare, and argue that this success is greatly overstated. Further, we explain why this negative verdict is likely true generally and not just (...)
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  47. Kant on Moral Agency and Women's Nature.Mari Mikkola - 2011 - Kantian Review 16 (1):89-111.
    Some commentators have condemned Kant’s moral project from a feminist perspective based on Kant’s apparently dim view of women as being innately morally deficient. Here I will argue that although his remarks concerning women are unsettling at first glance, a more detailed and closer examination shows that Kant’s view of women is actually far more complex and less unsettling than that attributed to him by various feminist critics. My argument, then, undercuts the justification for the severe feminist critique of Kant’s (...)
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  48.  74
    What Was Molyneux's Question A Question About?Jonathan Cohen & Mohan Matthen - forthcoming - In Routledge Handbook on Molyneux's Question. London: Routledge.
    Molyneux asked whether a newly sighted person could distinguish a sphere from a cube by sight alone, given that she was antecedently able to do so by touch. This, we contend, is a question about general ideas. To answer it, we must ask (a) whether spatial locations identified by touch can be identified also by sight, and (b) whether the integration of spatial locations into an idea of shape persists through changes of modality. Posed this way, Molyneux’s Question goes substantially (...)
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  49. Beyond the Instinct-Inference Dichotomy: A Unified Interpretation of Peirce's Theory of Abduction.Mousa Mohammadian - 2019 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 55 (2):138-160.
    I examine and resolve an exegetical dichotomy between two main interpretations of Peirce’s theory of abduction, namely, the Generative Interpretation and the Pursuitworthiness Interpretation. According to the former, abduction is the instinctive process of generating explanatory hypotheses through a mental faculty called insight. According to the latter, abduction is a rule-governed procedure for determining the relative pursuitworthiness of available hypotheses and adopting the worthiest one for further investigation—such as empirical tests—based on economic considerations. It is shown that the Generative Interpretation (...)
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  50. The Good, the Bad, and the Badass: On the Descriptive Adequacy of Kant's Conception of Moral Evil.Mark Timmons - 2017 - In Significance and System: Essays on Kant's Ethics. New York, USA: pp. 293-330.
    This chapter argues for an interpretation of Kant's psychology of moral evil that accommodates the so-called excluded middle cases and allows for variations in the magnitude of evil. The strategy involves distinguishing Kant's transcendental psychology from his empirical psychology and arguing that Kant's character rigorism is restricted to the transcendental level. The chapter also explains how Kant's theory of moral evil accommodates 'the badass'; someone who does evil for evil's sake.
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