Results for 'social trust'

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  1.  4
    Social Trust: Foundational and Philosophical Issues.Kevin Vallier & Michael Weber (eds.) - 2021 - Routledge.
    "With increasingly divergent views and commitments, and an all-or-nothing mindset in political life, it can seem hard to sustain the level of trust in other members of our society necessary to ensure our most basic institutions work. This book features interdisciplinary perspectives on social trust. The contributors address four main topics related to social trust. The first topic is empirical and formal work on norms and institutional trust, especially the relationships between trust and (...)
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  2. Social Trust and the Ethics of Immigration Policy &Ast.Ryan Pevnick - 2009 - Journal of Political Philosophy 17 (2):146-167.
  3. The Building Blocks of Social Trust. The Role of Customary Mechanisms and of Property Relations in the Emergence of Social Trust in the Context of the Commons.Marc Goetzmann - 2021 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences (4):004839312110084.
    This paper argues that social trust is the emergent product of a complex system of property relations, backed up by a sub-system of mutual monitoring. This happens in a context similar to Ostrom’s commons, where cooperation is necessary for the management of resources, in the absence of external authorities to enforce sanctions. I show that social trust emerges in this context because of an institutional structure that enables individuals to develop a generalized disposition to internalize the (...)
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  4. Social Trust and Human Communities.Trudy Govier - 1997
     
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  5.  8
    Social Trust and Auditor Reporting Conservatism.Deqiu Chen, Li Li, Xuejiao Liu & Gerald J. Lobo - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (4):1083-1108.
    We examine the implications of social trust for auditor reporting conservatism. Using a sample of listed companies in China, we find that clients located in high-trust regions are less likely to receive a non-clean audit opinion. This negative impact of social trust on auditor reporting conservatism increases when the client’s parent firm operates in a region of higher social trust, suggesting that social trust is contagious from a parent firm to its (...)
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  6.  19
    Social Trust and Corporate Misconduct: Evidence From China.Wang Dong, Hongling Han, Yun Ke & Kam C. Chan - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (2):539-562.
    We study whether greater social trust is associated with a lower incidence of corporate misconduct. Both social norm and network theory suggest that social trust can affect managerial behavior and reduce the likelihood of misconduct behavior. Consistent with this prediction, we find that social trust is negatively associated with corporate misconduct behavior. Moreover, we show that, when media coverage is higher, the negative relation between social trust and corporate misconduct behavior is (...)
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  7.  13
    Social Trust, Norms and Morality.Miroslav Popper - 2013 - Human Affairs 23 (3):443-457.
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  8.  42
    Does Social Trust Justify the Public Justification Principle?Collis Tahzib - 2021 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 38 (3):461-478.
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  9. Social Trust and Human Communities. [REVIEW]Lawrence C. Becker - 2000 - Dialogue 39 (1):173-174.
    In her many articles on the subject, Trudy Govier has made a substantial contribution to the recent philosophical literature on trust—not only to the discussion kindled by Annette Baier's provocative article "Trust and Anti-Trust", but to the larger, much older, low-intensity discussion among social scientists and philosophers about the relation between trust and effective government, stable social relationships, and psychological health. This book is devoted to the varieties and uses of trust in various (...)
     
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  10.  2
    Social Trust as a Development Factor – Selected Aspects.Małgorzata Kmak - 2021 - Studia Humana 10 (2):23-30.
    The aim of the article is to present selected relationships between social trust and the development of a territorial unit. Social trust affects the level of cooperation in society and decides about the competitiveness of a territorial unit [12, p. 7]. The main thesis of the article is the author’s conviction that there is a significant correlation between social trust and the activity of citizens, the consequence of which is the development of territorial units. (...)
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  11.  27
    Social Trust and Human Communities. [REVIEW]Lawrence C. Becker - 2000 - Dialogue 39 (1):173-.
    In her many articles on the subject, Trudy Govier has made a substantial contribution to the recent philosophical literature on trust—not only to the discussion kindled by Annette Baier's provocative article "Trust and Anti-Trust", but to the larger, much older, low-intensity discussion among social scientists and philosophers about the relation between trust and effective government, stable social relationships, and psychological health. This book is devoted to the varieties and uses of trust in various (...)
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  12. Social Traps and the Problem of Trust.Bo Rothstein - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    A 'social trap' is a situation where individuals, groups or organisations are unable to cooperate owing to mutual distrust and lack of social capital, even where cooperation would benefit all. Examples include civil strife, pervasive corruption, ethnic discrimination, depletion of natural resources and misuse of social insurance systems. Much has been written attempting to explain the problem, but rather less material is available on how to escape it. In this book, Bo Rothstein explores how social capital (...)
     
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  13. Social Trust and Human CommunitiesTrudy Govier Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1997, Xi + 289 Pp., $55.00, $19.95 Paper. [REVIEW]Lawrence C. Becker - 2000 - Dialogue 39 (1):173-175.
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  14.  5
    On Social Trust and Transitions.Darina Malová - 2010 - Human Affairs 20 (1).
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  15.  4
    Moral Disengagement and Generalized Social Trust as Mediators and Moderators of Rule-Respecting Behaviors During the COVID-19 Outbreak.Guido Alessandri, Lorenzo Filosa, Marie S. Tisak, Elisabetta Crocetti, Giuseppe Crea & Lorenzo Avanzi - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  16.  7
    Corruption and Social Trust: The Role of Corporate Social Responsibility.Namporn Thanetsunthorn - 2022 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 31 (1):49-79.
    Business Ethics, the Environment & Responsibility, EarlyView.
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  17.  2
    How Political and Social Trust Can Impact Social Distancing Practices During COVID-19 in Unexpected Ways.Frederike S. Woelfert & Jonas R. Kunst - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    In times of the coronavirus, complying with public health policies is essential to save lives. Understanding the factors that influence compliance with social distancing measures is therefore an urgent issue. The present research investigated the role of political and social trust for social distancing using a variety of methods. In Study 1, conducted with a sample from the United Kingdom in the midst of the virus outbreak, neither political nor social trust had main associations (...)
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  18.  1
    Social Security Satisfaction and People’s Subjective Wellbeing in China: The Serial Mediation Effect of Social Fairness and Social Trust.Na Li & Mang He - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    ObjectiveTo test the relationship between social security satisfaction, social fairness, social trust, and people’s subjective wellbeing in China and the serial mediation effect in this study.MethodsWe utilized the data from Chinese Social Survey in 2017 and 2019, involving 31 provinces across the country. There were 5,398 samples in 2017CSS and 2,580 samples in 2019CSS selected by the research objectives. There were 4,269 women and 3,709 men with the average age of participants being 43.ResultsThe results showed (...)
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  19. Latino/a Immigration: A Refutation of the Social Trust Argument.José Jorge Mendoza - 2015 - In Harald Bauder & Christian Matheis (eds.), Migration Policy and Practice: Interventions and Solutions. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 37-57.
    The social trust argument asserts that a political community cannot survive without social trust, and that social trust cannot be achieved or maintained without a political community having discretionary control over immigration. Various objections have already been raised against this argument, but because those objections all assume various liberal commitments they leave the heart of the social trust argument untouched. This chapter argues that by looking at the socio-historical circumstances of Latino/as in (...)
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  20. Economic Crisis and Social Trust: Reviewing the Effects of Economic Polarisation on Social and Institutional Confidence.Diego Torrente, Jordi Caïs & Catalina Bolancé - 2019 - Social Science Information 58 (4):631-659.
    The economic crisis of 2008 led to a significant erosion of trust in the countries that were hit hardest. However, whether this fall can best be explained by external economic factors or by the lack of response on the part of the institutions to civic needs and demands is unclear. This study uses the extreme case of Spain to bring new insights to this debate. Its aim is to analyse, in comparison with perceived institutional performance and other factors, the (...)
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  21.  53
    Why Trust Raoult? How Social Indicators Inform the Reputations of Experts.T. Y. Branch, Gloria Origgi & Tiffany Morisseau - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (3):299-316.
    The COVID-19 crisis has highlighted the considerable challenge of sourcing expertise and determining which experts to trust. Dissonant information fostered controversy in public discourse and encouraged an appeal to a wide range of social indicators of trustworthiness in order to decide whom to trust. We analyze public discourse on expertise by examining how social indicators inform the reputation of Dr. Didier Raoult, the French microbiologist who rose to international prominence as an early advocate for using hydroxychloroquine (...)
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  22.  22
    Corporate Social Responsibility, Ethical Leadership, and Trust Propensity: A Multi-Experience Model of Perceived Ethical Climate.S. Duane Hansen, Benjamin B. Dunford, Bradley J. Alge & Christine L. Jackson - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (4):649-662.
    Existing research on the formation of employee ethical climate perceptions focuses mainly on organization characteristics as antecedents, and although other constructs have been considered, these constructs have typically been studied in isolation. Thus, our understanding of the context in which ethical climate perceptions develop is incomplete. To address this limitation, we build upon the work of Rupp to develop and test a multi-experience model of ethical climate which links aspects of the corporate social responsibility, ethics, justice, and trust (...)
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  23. Trudy Govier, Social Trust and Human Communities. [REVIEW]Mark Webb - 1999 - Philosophy in Review 19:255-257.
     
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  24. Trudy Govier, Social Trust and Human Communities Reviewed By.Mark Owen Webb - 1999 - Philosophy in Review 19 (4):255-257.
     
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  25.  36
    Trust My Doctor, Trust My Pancreas’: Trust as an Emergent Quality of Social Practice.Simon Cohn - 2015 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 10:9.
    Growing attention is being paid to the importance of trust, and its corollaries such as mistrust and distrust, in health service and the central place they have in assessments of quality of care. Although initially focussing on doctor-patient relationships, more recent literature has broadened its remit to include trust held in more abstract entities, such as organisations and institutions. There has consequently been growing interest to develop rigorous and universal measures of trust.
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  26.  1
    Corruption and Social Trust: The Role of Corporate Social Responsibility.Namporn Thanetsunthorn - 2021 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 31 (1).
    Business Ethics, the Environment & Responsibility, Volume 31, Issue 1, Page 49-79, January 2022.
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  27.  21
    Trudy Gover, Social Trust and Human Communites.Hardin Russell - 1999 - Journal of Value Inquiry 33 (3):429-433.
  28.  9
    Blindness and Social Trust: The Effect of Early Visual Deprivation on Judgments of Trustworthiness.C. Ferrari, T. Vecchi, L. B. Merabet & Z. Cattaneo - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 55:156-164.
  29.  9
    Govier's Social Trust and Human Communities.Celeste Friend - 2000 - Informal Logic 20 (1).
  30. Trust Me—I’M a Public Intellectual”: Margaret Atwood’s and David Suzuki’s Social Epistemologies of Climate Science.Boaz Miller - 2015 - In Michael Keren & Richard Hawkins‎ (eds.), Speaking Power to Truth: Digital Discourse and the Public Intellectual. Athabasca University Press‎. pp. 113-128.
    Margaret Atwood and David Suzuki are two of the most prominent Canadian public ‎intellectuals ‎involved in the global warming debate. They both argue that anthropogenic global ‎warming is ‎occurring, warn against its grave consequences, and urge governments and the ‎public to take ‎immediate, decisive, extensive, and profound measures to prevent it. They differ, ‎however, in the ‎reasons and evidence they provide in support of their position. While Suzuki ‎stresses the scientific ‎evidence in favour of the global warming theory and the (...)
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  31.  9
    The Relationship Between Family Social Trust and Running Away From Home of Girls.Aghabakhshi Habib Kobari Susane & Zahra Zamany - 2012 - Social Research (Islamic Azad University Roudehen Branch) 5 (14):31-49.
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  32.  4
    An Analysis of Social Trust Rate in Police and its Related Factors in Ilam City in 2009.F. Kamran & E. Ahmadian - 2009 - Social Research (Islamic Azad University Roudehen Branch) 2 (4):19-40.
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  33. The Elixir of Social Trust: Social Capital and Cultures of Challenge in Health Movements.Alex Law - 2008 - In Julie Brownlie, Alexandra Greene & Alexandra Howson (eds.), Researching Trust and Health. Routledge. pp. 175.
     
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  34.  34
    Leaving Town for the Market: The Emergence and Expansion of Social Trust in the Works of Elinor Ostrom and Henry Sumner Maine.Marc Goetzmann - 2019 - Teoria E Critica Della Regolazione Sociale 2 (19):147-168.
    This paper uses the evolutionary frame provided by the Victorian jurist Henry Sumner Maine to describe the process by which trust can be seen as the product of a gradual development that starts with small-scale communities and later allows market exchanges to develop themselves. I also argue, using the work of Elinor Ostrom (1990), that trust emerges first within small-scale communities, where first- and second-degree collective action problems need to be resolved. The development of a social disposition (...)
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  35.  80
    Corporate Social Responsibility and the Benefits of Employee Trust: A Cross-Disciplinary Perspective. [REVIEW]S. Duane Hansen, Benjamin B. Dunford, Alan D. Boss, R. Wayne Boss & Ingo Angermeier - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):29-45.
    Research on corporate social responsibility (CSR) has tended to focus on external stakeholders and outcomes, revealing little about internal effects that might also help explain CSR-firm performance linkages and the impact that corporate marketing strategies can have on internal stakeholders such as employees. The two studies ( N = 1,116 and N = 2,422) presented in this article draw on theory from both corporate marketing and organizational behavior (OB) disciplines to test the general proposition that employee trust partially (...)
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  36. The Influence of Perception of Social Equality and Social Trust on Subjective Well-Being Among Rural Chinese People: The Moderator Role of Education.Shuang Gao & Jilun Zhao - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    The present study explored the moderation effect of education on the relationship between the perception of social equality and social trust and individuals’ subjective well-being in rural China. Data were derived from the nationally representative cross-sectional Chinese General Social Survey. After handling missingness, 5,911 eligible participants from the 2015 wave were included in the model. We used logistic regression to test the hypotheses. We first tested the effect of the perception of social equality and (...) trust on SWB. Then we added an interaction term to test the moderation effect of education in this relationship. The results show that education had a significant moderating effect on the association between general social trust and SWB. While had no significant effect on the association between the perception of social equality, special social trust and SWB. The perception of social equality had significant effects in both groups. The relationship between special social trust and SWB in both groups was not significant. For the more educated group, general social trust had a significant and positive effect on SWB. (shrink)
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  37. Social Media, Trust, and the Epistemology of Prejudice.Karen Frost-Arnold - 2016 - Social Epistemology 30 (5-6):513-531.
    Ignorance of one’s privileges and prejudices is an epistemic problem. While the sources of ignorance of privilege and prejudice are increasingly understood, less clarity exists about how to remedy ignorance. In fact, the various causes of ignorance can seem so powerful, various, and mutually reinforcing that studying the epistemology of ignorance can inspire pessimism about combatting socially constructed ignorance. I argue that this pessimism is unwarranted. The testimony of members of oppressed groups can often help members of privileged groups overcome (...)
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  38. Trust and the Value of Overconfidence: A Bayesian Perspective on Social Network Communication.Aron Vallinder & Erik J. Olsson - 2014 - Synthese 191 (9):1991-2007.
    The paper presents and defends a Bayesian theory of trust in social networks. In the first part of the paper, we provide justifications for the basic assumptions behind the model, and we give reasons for thinking that the model has plausible consequences for certain kinds of communication. In the second part of the paper we investigate the phenomenon of overconfidence. Many psychological studies have found that people think they are more reliable than they actually are. Using a simulation (...)
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  39.  4
    Social Class Identity, Public Service Satisfaction, and Happiness of Residents: The Mediating Role of Social Trust.Xiaogang Zhou, Shuilin Chen, Lu Chen & Liqing Li - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Happiness is the eternal pursuit of mankind and is also the ultimate goal of social governance and national development. Based on data from the Chinese General Social Survey, this study used a structural equation model to analyze the influence of social class identity and public service satisfaction on the happiness of residents. The effect of public service satisfaction and social trust between social class identity and residents’ happiness was tested using the Monte Carlo method. (...)
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  40.  94
    Building Trust Between Consumers and Corporations: The Role of Consumer Perceptions of Transparency and Social Responsibility. [REVIEW]Jiyun Kang & Gwendolyn Hustvedt - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (2):1-13.
    Developing trust in a company is a significant part of building the company-consumer relationship. Previous studies have sought to identify the positive consequences of trust such as loyalty and repurchase, but the question of what builds trust remains largely unanswered. To answer the question, we developed a model that depicts the relationships among transparency, social responsibility, trust, attitude, word-of-mouth (WOM) intention, and purchase intention. An online survey was conducted with a US nationwide sample of 303 (...)
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  41.  4
    European TV Environments and Citizens' Social Trust: Evidence From Multilevel Analyses.Ansgar Wolsing & Rüdiger Schmitt-Beck - 2010 - Communications 35 (4):461-483.
    This paper sheds new light on Putnam's hypothesis that watching television, particularly entertainment programs, contributes to an erosion of social trust. Previous studies have been unable to reach convincing evidence regarding this claim. It is argued that this is a consequence of the neglect of indirect, interpersonally mediated TV effects which supplement the influence of direct exposure, and extend even to those who do not watch television. Using data from the 2002 and 2004 waves of the European (...) Survey in combination with aggregate data from telemetric audience research, we conduct a multilevel analysis of TV's impact on social trust. Investigating this macro-micro relationship, we find that patterns of general TV use in 25 European societies exert substantial effects on individual social trust that by far exceed those of individual TV use. In line with Putnam's hypothesis, there is a negative impact of total TV time; however, high market shares of public TV increase social trust. (shrink)
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  42. Trust in a Social and Digital World.Mark Alfano & Colin Klein - 2019 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 1 (8):1-8.
  43.  9
    Defending the Social Value of Knowledge as a Safeguard for Public Trust.S. Holzer Felicitas - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (7):559-567.
    The ‘socially valuable knowledge’ principle has been widely acknowledged as one of the most important guiding principles for biomedical research involving human subjects. The principle states that the potential of producing socially valuable knowledge is a necessary requirement, although not sufficient, for the ethical conduct of research projects. This is due to the assumption that the social value of knowledge avoids exploitation of research subjects and justifies the use of health resources. However, more recently, several authors have started interrogating (...)
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  44.  34
    Social Change and the Adoption and Adaptation of Knowledge Claims: Whose Truth Do You Trust in Regard to Sustainable Agriculture? [REVIEW]Michael S. Carolan - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (3):325-339.
    This paper examines sustainable agriculture’s steady rise as a legitimate farm management system. In doing this, it offers an account of social change that centers on trust and its intersection with networks of knowledge. The argument to follow is informed by the works of Foucault and Latour but moves beyond this literature in important ways. Guided by and building upon earlier conceptual framework first forwarded by Carolan and Bell (2003, Environmental Values 12: 225–245), sustainable agriculture is examined through (...)
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  45. Epistemic Trust and Social Location.Nancy Daukas - 2006 - Episteme 3 (1-2):109-124.
    Epistemic trustworthiness is defined as a complex character state that supervenes on a relation between first- and second-order beliefs, including beliefs about others as epistemic agents. In contexts shaped by unjust power relations, its second-order components create a mutually supporting link between a deficiency in epistemic character and unjust epistemic exclusion on the basis of group membership. In this way, a deficiency in the virtue of epistemic trustworthiness plays into social/epistemic interactions that perpetuate social injustice. Overcoming that deficiency (...)
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  46.  32
    Trusting in Reason: Martin Hollis and the Philosophy of Social Action.Preston T. King (ed.) - 2003 - Frank Cass.
    Martin Hollis (d.1998) was arguably the most incisive, eloquent and witty philosopher of the social sciences of his time. His work is appreciated and contested here by some of the most eminent of contemporary social theorists. Hollis's philosophy of social action, routinely distinguished between understanding (rational) and explanation (causal). He argued that the aptest account of human interaction was to be made in terms of the first. Thus he focused upon the human reasons, for, rather than upon (...)
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  47.  6
    The Effects of the 2016 Copa América Centenario Victory on Social Trust, Self-Transcendent Aspirations and Evaluated Subjective Well-Being: The Role of Identity With the National Team and Collective Pride in Major Sport Events.Diego Bravo, Xavier Oriol, Marcos Gómez, Diego Cortez & Wenceslao Unanue - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  48. (Social) Metacognition and (Self-)Trust.Kourken Michaelian - 2012 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (4):481-514.
    What entitles you to rely on information received from others? What entitles you to rely on information retrieved from your own memory? Intuitively, you are entitled simply to trust yourself, while you should monitor others for signs of untrustworthiness. This article makes a case for inverting the intuitive view, arguing that metacognitive monitoring of oneself is fundamental to the reliability of memory, while monitoring of others does not play a significant role in ensuring the reliability of testimony.
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  49.  35
    Competing Social Norms: Why Women Are Responsible For, But Not Trusted with, Contraception.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2012 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (1):67-84.
    A necessary component to reproductive autonomy is being trusted to make reproductive decisions. In the case of contraception, however, women are considered both trustworthy and untrustworthy. Women are held responsible for contraception and because responsibility usually stems from trust, it appears that women are trusted with contraception. Yet myriad laws and forms of surveillance and normalization surrounding contraception make women seem untrustworthy. Relying on Amy Mullin’s conception of trust that we trust those who we assume believe in (...)
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  50.  7
    A Trust Network Model for Social Rights Fulfilment.David Vitale - 2018 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 38 (4):706-732.
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