Search results for 'Buddha and Buddhism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Hye Young Won (2008). The Psychic Power of Buddha in the Early Buddhism Community. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:287-288.score: 96.0
    The author of this paper aimed to understand the early Buddhism community in its entirety by examining the individual episodes in the "Mahavagga". There is a remarkable experience of the psychic power between the Buddha and the Brahmins. They are both aware of coming across of psychic forces that entered the way to the Buddhist Community. Using the brahmins mythology as a instrument for missionary work, the early Buddhism brings people close to Buddha's community. The (...) visited Uruvela-Kassapa and took lodging for the night where the sacred fire was kept, in spite of Kassapa's warning that the spot was inhabited by a fierce Naga. The Buddha, by his magical powers, overcame, first this N ganad then another, both of whom vomited fire and smoke. Kassapabeing pleased with this exhibition of iddhi-power, undertook to provide the Buddha with his daily food. The Buddha spent the whole rainy season there, performing, in all, three thousand five hundred miracles of various kinds, reading the thoughts of kassapa, splitting firewood for the ascetic sacrifices, heating stoves for them to use after bathing in the cold weather, etc. Still Kassapa persisted in the thought, "The great ascetic is of great magic power, but he is not anarahant like me." Finally the Buddha decided to startle him by declaring that he was not an arahant, neither did the way he followed lead to arahantship. Thereon kassapa owned defeat and reverently asked for ordination. The Buddha asked him to consult with his pupils, and they cut off their hair and threw it with their sacrificial utensils into the river and were all ordained. Nadi Kassapa and Gaya Kassapa were ordained with their pupils. At Gay sisa the Buddha preached to them the Fire Sermon, and they all attained arahantship for the early Buddhist Community. The episode of Uruvela Kassaps in the Mahavagga text ultimately idealizes the power of psychic and the start of the community. It is probable, even at the time when the episode were written, that as a matter of fact every one, in ordinary daily life, spoke imply the vernaculars in a much more simple and natural state of society. It is the Mahavagga authors, when addressing a cultured public at a date when the vernaculars had become the paramount literary language. Another point is that though brahmins take part in the religious and philosophical conversations of those early tims, and in the accounts of them are always referred to with respect, and threaten with the same courtesythat they always themselves extended also to others, yet they hold no predominant position. The majority of the ascetic, and the most influential individuals among them, are not brahmins. That is only a matter of course will be the obvious subjection. The Mahavagga texts I quotes, if not the work of bitter opponents, were at least composed under India bramins influence, and are prejudiced against the brahmins. (shrink)
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  2. R. Singh (1997). The Ancient Origins of Bhakti and the Dharma of the Buddha (Buddhism, Law, Vedic Origins). Journal of Dharma 22:460-469.score: 90.0
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  3. ĒḌīPī Kalansūriya (1987). A Philosophical Analysis of Buddhist Notions: The Buddha and Wittgenstein. Sri Satguru Publications.score: 84.0
     
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  4. Ke Padmārāvu (2007). Buddhist Philosophy or the Message of the Buddha. Lokayata Prachuranalu.score: 84.0
     
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  5. Bronwyn Finnigan (2011). How Can a Buddha Come to Act?: The Possibility of a Buddhist Account of Ethical Agency. Philosophy East and West 61 (1):134-160.score: 78.0
    In the past decade or so there has been a surge of monographs on the nature of ‘Buddhist Ethics.’ For the most part, authors are concerned with developing and defending explications of Buddhism as a normative ethical theory with an apparent aim of putting Buddhist thought directly in dialogue with contemporary Western philosophical debates in ethics. Despite disagreement among Buddhist ethicists concerning which contemporary normative ethical theory a Buddhist ethic would most closely resemble (if any), 1 it is arguable (...)
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  6. Ally Ostrowski (2006). Buddha Browsing: American Buddhism and the Internet. Contemporary Buddhism 7 (1):91-103.score: 78.0
  7. Jacob Raz (2010). “Kill the Buddha” Quietism in Action and Quietism as Action in Zen Buddhist Thought and Practice. Common Knowledge 16 (3):439-456.score: 78.0
    A contribution to the sixth installment of the Common Knowledge symposium “Apology for Quietism,” this article proposes that, despite endless debates within Zen Buddhism between quietist tendencies (“sitting quietly, doing nothing”) and the instruction to act in the world (“go wash the dishes”), Zen has always held a nondualist approach that denies any contradiction between these seemingly distinct ways. Zen has never really seen them as distinct. The article does survey, however, several quietist sources for Zen in early Indian (...)
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  8. John D'Arcy May (2005). The Lost Sutras of Jesus: Unlocking the Ancient Wisdom of the Xian Monks, And: The Buddha's Gospel: A Buddhist Interpretation of Jesus' Words (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 25 (1):190-192.score: 78.0
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  9. J. D. May (2005). Ray Riegert and Thomas Moore, The Lost Sutras of Jesus: Unlocking the Ancient Wisdom of the Xian Monks, and Lindsay Falvey, The Buddha's Gospel: A Buddhist Interpretation of Jesus' Words. Buddhist Christian Studies 25:190.score: 78.0
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  10. George Grimm (1958). The Doctrine of the Buddha, the Religion of Reason and Meditation. Berlin, Akademie-Verlag.score: 72.0
    The book deals with Truth as the theme and basis of the doctrine of the Buddha.
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  11. Ming-Wood Liu (1985). The Yogācārā and Mādhyamika Interpretations of the Buddha-Nature Concept in Chinese Buddhism. Philosophy East and West 35 (2):171-193.score: 72.0
  12. Yaroslav Komarovski (2006). Reburying the Treasure—Maintaining the Continuity: Two Texts by Śākya Mchog Ldan on the Buddha-Essence. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 34 (6):521-570.score: 72.0
    The rich and interconnected universe of Śākya Mchog Ldan’s views, including those on the buddha-essence, cannot be limited to or summarized in a few neat categories. Nevertheless, the following two interrelated ideas are crucial for understanding Śākya Mchog Ldan’s interpretation of the buddha-essence: 1) only Mahāyāna āryas (’phags pa) have the buddha-essence characterized by the purity from adventitious stains (glo bur rnam dag).
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  13. Yün-hua Jan (1981). The Mind as the Buddha-Nature: The Concept of the Absolute in Ch'an Buddhism. Philosophy East and West 31 (4):467-477.score: 72.0
  14. Howard L. Parsons (1951). Buddha and Buddhism: A New Appraisal. Philosophy East and West 1 (3):8-37.score: 72.0
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  15. Irving Babbitt, F. Max Müller & Dora Drew Babbitt (eds.) (1936). The Dhammapada. London, Oxford University Press.score: 72.0
    The 423 verses in the collection known a The Dhammapada are attributed to the Buddha himself and form the essence of the ethics of Buddhist philosophy.
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  16. Roger R. Jackson (1988). The Buddha as Pramā $\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{$\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{\Smash{\Scriptscriptstyle\Cdot}$}}{N}$}}{N} " />Abhūta: Epithets and Arguments in the Buddhist “Logical” Tradition. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 16 (4).score: 72.0
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  17. E. J. Thomas (1947). The Vedāntic Buddhism of the Buddha. A Collection of Historical Texts Translated From the Original Pāli and Edited by J. G. Jennings, M.A. (Oxon.), C.I.E. (Geoffrey Cumberlege, Oxford University Press, London. 1947. Pp. Cxvii + 697. Price £2 2s. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 22 (83):275-.score: 72.0
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  18. José Pereira & Francis Tiso (1988). The Evolution of Buddhist Systematics From the Buddha to Vasubandhu. Philosophy East and West 38 (2):172-186.score: 72.0
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  19. Madhumita Chattopadhyay (2010). Lord Buddha and Buddhism Seen Through the Eyes of Rabindranath. International Journal on Humanistic Ideology 2:87-110.score: 72.0
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  20. Christopher John Farley (1993). This Buddha's for You.(A Bar in Osaka, Japan has on-Site Buddhist Priest). In Jonathan Westphal & Carl Avren Levenson (eds.), Time. Hackett Pub. Co.. 13.score: 72.0
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  21. Peter Flügel (1997). Review of'Curators of the Buddha: The Study of Buddhism Under Colonialism'. Edited by DS Lopez Jr. 1995. [REVIEW] International Journal of Hindu Studies 1 (3).score: 72.0
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  22. RogerR Jackson (1988). The Buddha as Pram? $$\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{$\Smash{\Scriptscriptstyle\Cdot}$}}{N}$$ Abh?Ta: Epithets and Arguments in the Buddhist ?Logical? Tradition. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 16 (4):335-365.score: 72.0
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  23. Diane E. Riggs (forthcoming). Fukudenkai: Sewing the Buddha's Robe in Contemporary Japanese Buddhist Practice. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies.score: 72.0
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  24. Patricia Sharp (2011). Buddhist Enlightenment and the Destruction of Attractor Networks: A Neuroscientific Speculation on the Buddhist Path From Everyday Consciousness to Buddha-Awakening. Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (3-4):3-4.score: 72.0
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  25. G. K. Chesterton (1984). Buddha Versus Buddhism. The Chesterton Review 10 (1):1-4.score: 72.0
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  26. David L. Haberman (2009). Buddhism : In the Footsteps of the Buddha. In Leslie Forster Stevenson (ed.), Ten Theories of Human Nature. Oxford University Press.score: 72.0
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  27. Trevor Oswald Ling (ed.) (1981). The Buddha's Philosophy of Man: Early Indian Buddhist Dialogues. Dent.score: 72.0
     
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  28. Richard B. Mather (forthcoming). The Life of the Buddha and the Buddhist Life: Wang Jung's (468-93)" Songs of Religious Joy"(Fa-le Tz'u). Journal of the American Oriental Society.score: 72.0
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  29. B. Moore-Gilbert (2000). Curators of the Buddha: The Study of Buddhism Under Colonialism. Edited by Donald S. Lopez, Jr. The European Legacy 5 (1):125-125.score: 72.0
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  30. Leonard Priestley, Pudgalavāda Buddhist Philosophy. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 66.0
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  31. Paul Dahlke (1927). Buddhism and its Place in the Mental Life of Mankind. London, Macmillan.score: 66.0
    To offer something to the actual thinker, to assist him in the struggle against the all overwhelming might of current thoughts & opinions, with such a high ...
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  32. Lynken Ghose (2007). Karma and the Possibility of Purification: An Ethical and Psychological Analysis of the Doctrine of Karma in Buddhism. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (2):259-290.score: 66.0
  33. W. F. Jayasuriya (1963). The Psychology and Philosophy of Buddhism. Colombo, Y. M. B. A. Press.score: 66.0
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  34. Fedor Ippolitovich Shcherbatskoĭ (1962). Buddhist Logic. New York, Dover Publications.score: 66.0
     
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  35. Christopher W. Gowans (2003). Philosophy of the Buddha. Routledge.score: 54.0
    Philosophy of the Buddha is a philosophical introduction to the teaching of the Buddha. It carefully guides readers through the basic ideas and practices of the Buddha, including kamma (karma), rebirth, the not-self doctrine, the Four <span class='Hi'>Noble</span> Truths, the Eightfold Path, ethics, meditation, nonattachment, and Nibbâna (Nirvana). The book includes an account of the life of the Buddha as well as comparisons of his teaching with practical and theoretical aspects of some Western philosophical outlooks, both (...)
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  36. Malcolm David Eckel (1994). To See the Buddha: A Philosopher's Quest for the Meaning of Emptiness. Princeton University Press.score: 54.0
    Malcolm David Eckel takes us on a contemporary quest to discover the essential meaning behind the Buddha's many representations. Eckel's bold thesis proposes that the proper understanding of Buddhist philosophy must be thoroughly religious--an understanding revealed in Eckel's new translation of the philospher Bhavaviveka's major work, The Flame of Reason. Eckel shows that the dimensions of early Indian Buddhism--popular art, conventional piety, and critical philosophy--all work together to express the same religious yearning for the fullness of emptiness that (...)
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  37. Stephen J. Laumakis (2008). An Introduction to Buddhist Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 54.0
    In this clearly written undergraduate textbook, Stephen Laumakis explains the origin and development of Buddhist ideas and concepts, focusing on the philosophical ideas and arguments presented and defended by selected thinkers and sutras from various traditions. He starts with a sketch of the Buddha and the Dharma, and highlights the origins of Buddhism in India. He then considers specific details of the Dharma with special attention to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology, and examines the development of Buddhism in (...)
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  38. Jonathan A. Silk (2007). Good and Evil in Indian Buddhism: The Five Sins of Immediate Retribution. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 35 (3):253-286.score: 54.0
    Indian Buddhist sources speak of five sins of immediate retribution: murder of mother, father, an arhat, drawing the blood of a buddha, and creating a schism in the monastic community. This category provides the paradigm for sinfulness in Buddhism. Yet even these sins can and will, be expiated in the long run, demonstrating the overwhelmingly positive nature of Buddhist ethics.
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  39. Yaroslav Komarovski (2010). Shakya Chokden's Interpretation of the Ratnagotravibhāga: “Contemplative” or “Dialectical”? [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (4):441-452.score: 54.0
    This reconciliation of the dialectical and contemplative approaches to the buddha-essence is related to and closely resembles Shakchok’s reconciliation of the two approaches to ultimate reality advocated respectively by Niḥsvabhāvavāda (ngo bo nyid med par smra ba, “Proponents of Entitylessness”) system of Madhyamaka and Alīkākāravāda (rnam rdzun pa, “False Aspectarians”) system of Yogācāra. These approaches in turn are connected respectively to the explicit teachings (dngos bstan) of the second dharmacakra (chos ’khor, “Wheel of Dharma”) and the definitive teachings (nges (...)
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  40. Traleg Kyabgon (2001). The Essence of Buddhism: An Introduction to its Philosophy and Practice. Shambhala.score: 54.0
    This lucid overview of the Buddhist path takes the perspective of the three "vehicles" of Tibetan Buddhism: the Hinayana, Mahayana, and Vajrayana. While these vehicles are usually presented as a historical development, they are here equated with the attitudes that individuals bring to their Buddhist practice. Basic to them all, however, is the need to understand our own immediate condition. The primary tool for achieving this is meditation, and The Essence of Buddhism serves as a handbook for the (...)
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  41. Antoine Panaioti (2012). Nietzsche and Buddhist Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 54.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Nihilism and Buddhism: 1. Nietzsche as Buddha; 2. Nietzsche as anti-Buddha; Part II. Suffering: 3. Amor Fati and the affirmation of suffering; 4. Nirvana and the cessation of suffering; Part III. Compassion: 5. Overcoming compassion; 6. Cultivating compassion; Conclusion: toward a new response to the challenge of nihilism.
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  42. Michel Clasquin-Johnson (2013). On the Death of the Charismatic Founder: Re-Viewing Some Buddhist Sources. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 12 (34):3-18.score: 54.0
    Routinization is a term invented by Max Weber to describe events after the death of a charismatic religious leader. It has become widely used in the humanities in a variety of contexts. The death of the historical Buddha produced the first known instance of extreme routinization, in which the charisma of the founder is transmuted into a system of teachings that are themselves invested with authority, quite separate from the charisma of any individual within that tradition. This article examines (...)
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  43. Donald S. Lopez (2012). The Scientific Buddha: His Short and Happy Life. Yale University Press.score: 54.0
    A Purified Religion -- The Birth of the Scientific Buddha -- The Problem with Karma -- Interlude: A Primer on Buddhist Meditation -- The Death of the Scientific Buddha.
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  44. Archie J. Bahm (1959/1993). Philosophy of the Buddha. Asian Humanities Press.score: 54.0
    For those seeking an answer to this question and to understand Buddhism as an important part of the world's religious and cultural heritage, Philosophy of the Buddha is an excellent introduction and guide.
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  45. Surya Das (2011). Buddha Standard Time: Awakening to the Infinite Possibilities of Now. Harperone.score: 54.0
    We're all given the same twenty-four hours a day. We can spend our time feeling hurried and harried, overwhelmed by chores and demands, distracted and burned out . . . or we can awaken to Buddha Standard Time, the realm of timelessness where every choice, every action, and every breath can be one of renewal and infinite possibilities. Buddha Standard Time shares one of the great realizations of Buddhism, an insight that anyone can learn to apply. The (...)
     
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  46. Matthew Kapstein, S. Radhakrishnan, Iqbal Singh & Arvind Sharma (eds.) (2004). The Buddhism Omnibus. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    The three works brought together in this collection explore Buddhism as a rich source of literary legend, an austere ethical guide, and a contemporary philosophy very relevant in the modern world in view of the resurgence of interest in the Buddha and his philosophy. Matthew T. Kapstein in his Introduction provides a concise historical overview of Buddhism in India and the renewal of interest in the Buddha s teachings and also situates the works in their proper (...)
     
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  47. Christopher Moreman (2008). A Modern Meditation on Death: Identifying Buddhist Teachings in George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead. Contemporary Buddhism 9 (2):151-165.score: 48.0
    A confluence of increasing interest in popular culture as a source for religious inspiration and the growing interest, both popular and scholarly, in zombie-fiction bring together several possibilities for scholarship in the context of religious studies. This paper will present one aspect of the zombie-craze in the light of Buddhist philosophy. The Buddha taught that the illusion of self-ish-ness, and resulting attachments, are the greatest hurdles to achieving nibbana. Through meditating on the decomposing corpse, Buddhists may come to realize (...)
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  48. Robert Ellis (2000). Parfit and the Buddha: Identity and Identification Inreasons and Persons. Contemporary Buddhism 1 (1):91-106.score: 48.0
    (2000). Parfit and the buddha: Identity and identification in reasons and persons. Contemporary Buddhism: Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 91-106. doi: 10.1080/14639940008573723.
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  49. Jonathan Watts (2012). The Vihara of Compassion: An Introduction to Buddhist Care for the Dying and Bereaved in the Modern World. Contemporary Buddhism 13 (1):139-155.score: 48.0
    The modern hospice movement is generally understood to have begun with the founding in 1967 by Cicely Saunders of the St. Christopher's Hospice in the United Kingdom. As the movement has grown, it has inspired Buddhists in Asia to rediscover and revive their own traditions around death and caring for the terminally ill and the bereaved that date back to the time of the Buddha. In Asia and the West as well, we are witnessing the work of several groups (...)
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