Search results for 'Identity (Psychology) in literature' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Roy Porter (1990). Christopher Fox. Locke and the Scriblerians. Identity and Consciousness in Early Eighteenth Century Britain. Berkeley, Los Angeles and London: University of California Press, 1988. Pp. 174. ISBN 0-520-05859-3. No Price Given.Christopher Fox. Psychology and Literature in the Eighteenth Century. . New York AMS Press, 1987. Pp. 372. ISBN 0-404-61474-4. $42.50. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 23 (1):110.
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  2.  3
    Gerald Izenberg (2008). Identity Becomes an Issue: European Literature in the 1920s. Modern Intellectual History 5 (2):279-307.
    The meaning of in its contemporary sense of or what is of relatively recent vintage. It became current as a concept of individual and group psychology only through Erik Erikson's work in the 1950s and its extension to collectivities in the social and political upheavals of the 1960s. But an important strand of European literature began calling the possibility of fixed self-definition into question in the 1920s, occasionally even deploying the word explicitly. In the work of Hermann Hesse, Virginia (...)
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  3. Blakey Vermeule (2000). The Party of Humanity: Writing Moral Psychology in Eighteenth-Century Britain. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    What is the relationship between the self and society? Where do moral judgments come from? As Blakey Vermeule demonstrates in The Party of Humanity, such questions about sociability and moral philosophy were central to eighteenth-century writers and artists. Vermeule focuses on a group of aesthetically complicated moral texts: Alexander Pope's character sketches and Dunciad , Samuel Johnson's Life of Savage, and David Hume's self-consciously theatrical writings on pride and his autobiographical writings on religious melancholia. These writers and their characters confronted (...)
     
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  4.  6
    Paul Cooke & Helen Vassallo (eds.) (2009). Alienation and Alterity: Otherness in Modern and Contemporary Francophone Contexts. Peter Lang.
    The essays in this collection, which derive from the conference 'Alienation and Alterity: Otherness in Modern and Contemporary Francophone Contexts', held at the University of Exeter in September 2007, explore various aspects of this ...
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  5.  35
    Daniel Kolak (1993). The Metaphysics and Metapsychology of Personal Identity: Why Thought Experiments Matter in Deciding Who We Are. American Philosophical Quarterly 30 (1):39-50.
    What are the metaphysical and metapsychological boundaries of a person? How do we draw our borders? This much is clear: personal identity without thought experiments is impossible. I develop a new way of conceptualizing physiological and psychological borders leading to a re-evaluation of the problem of personal identity within the contemporary literature, especially Parfit, arguing that we must, necessarily, turn to the conceptual analysis of metaphysical and metapsychological borders. I offer an explanation of the persistence of common (...)
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  6.  44
    Roy Porter (ed.) (1997). Rewriting the Self: Histories From the Renaissance to the Present. Routledge.
    Rewriting the Self is an exploration of ideas of the self in the western cultural tradition from the Renaissance to the present. The contributors analyze different religious, philosophical, psychological, political, psychoanalytical and literary models of personal identity from a number of viewpoints, including the history of ideas, contemporary gender politics, and post-modernist literary theory. Challenging the received version of the "ascent of western man," they assess the discursive construction of the self in the light of political, technological and social (...)
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  7.  4
    Jeffrey P. Lindstrom (1993). Review of The Saturated Self: Dilemmas of Identity in Contemporary Life. [REVIEW] Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 13 (2):160-165.
    Reviews the book, The saturated self: Dilemmas of identity in contemporary life by Kenneth J. Gergen . There is, perhaps, no other concept as seminal for psychology as the self. For this reason alone, Kenneth Gergen's book represents an important contribution to our understanding of this influential concept. However, Gergen's vision is so broad, his arguments so compelling, and the implications so revolutionary, that the work defies confinement exclusively within the walls of academia. In essence, Gergen is articulating his (...)
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  8. Pierre Marie Beaude & Jacques Fantino (eds.) (2010). Identité Et Altérité: La Norme En Question?: Hommage à Pierre-Marie Beaude. Université Paul-Verlaine, Centre de Recherche Écritures.
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  9. Jason Holt (1999). Blindsight: An Essay in the Philosophy of Psychology and Mind. Dissertation, The University of Western Ontario (Canada)
    Although philosophers acknowledge the significance of blindsight for theories of mind---indeed, some try to trade on it---they have not given the phenomenon the extended treatment it deserves. In helping to fill this gap, I argue that despite attempts to use it in undermining qualia , blindsight supports realism about qualia, and an identity theoretic account of them. ;In Chapter 1 I argue against attempts by Dennett and the Churchlands to use blindsight in undermining qualia. I complement this by criticizing (...)
     
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  10.  87
    Gary D. Fireman, T. E. McVay & Owen J. Flanagan (eds.) (2003). Narrative and Consciousness: Literature, Psychology and the Brain. Oxford University Press.
    We define our conscious experience by constructing narratives about ourselves and the people with whom we interact. Narrative pervades our lives--conscious experience is not merely linked to the number and variety of personal stories we construct with each other within a cultural frame, but is subsumed by them. The claim, however, that narrative constructions are essential to conscious experience is not useful or informative unless we can also begin to provide a distinct, organized, and empirically consistent explanation for narrative in (...)
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  11. Gary D. Fireman, Ted E. McVay & Owen J. Flanagan (eds.) (2003). Narrative and Consciousness: Literature, Psychology and the Brain. Oxford University Press Usa.
    We define our conscious experience by constructing narratives about ourselves and the people with whom we interact. Narrative pervades our lives--conscious experience is not merely linked to the number and variety of personal stories we construct with each other within a cultural frame, but is subsumed by them. The claim, however, that narrative constructions are essential to conscious experience is not useful or informative unless we can also begin to provide a distinct, organized, and empirically consistent explanation for narrative in (...)
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  12. Gary D. Fireman, Ted E. McVay & Owen J. Flanagan (eds.) (2003). Narrative and Consciousness: Literature, Psychology and the Brain. Oxford University Press Usa.
    We define our conscious experience by constructing narratives about ourselves and the people with whom we interact. Narrative pervades our lives--conscious experience is not merely linked to the number and variety of personal stories we construct with each other within a cultural frame, but is subsumed by them. The claim, however, that narrative constructions are essential to conscious experience is not useful or informative unless we can also begin to provide a distinct, organized, and empirically consistent explanation for narrative in (...)
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  13. Christian Perring (1998). Divided Minds and Successive Selves: Ethical Issues in Disorders of Identity and Personality. [REVIEW] Journal of Mind and Behavior 19 (1):91-102.
    Exactly when Philosophy of Psychiatry started as a subfield of Philosophy is hard to say. There are several different estimates of how old psychiatry itself is, from one hundred to three hundred years, and of course there has been discussion and treatment of mental illness for at least a couple of thousand years. A host of issues which could count as belonging to the field have been discussed just within the last hundred years. For instance, a large literature on (...)
     
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  14.  38
    Raymond Martin (1997). Self-Concern: An Experiential Approach to What Matters in Survival. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a major contribution to the philosophical literature on the nature of the self, personal identity, and survival. Its distinctive methodology is one that is phenomenologically descriptive rather than metaphysical and normative. On the basis of this approach Raymond Martin shows that the distinction between self and other is not nearly as fundamental a feature of our so-called egoistic values as has been traditionally thought. He explains how the belief in a self as a fixed, continuous (...)
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  15.  17
    Javier Saavedra Macías & Rafael Velez Núñez (2011). The Other Self: Psychopathology and Literature. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):257-267.
    The figure of the “double” or the other self is an important topic in the history of literature. Many centuries before Jean Paul Richter coined the term, “doppelgänger,” at the beginning of the Romantic Movement in the year 1796, it is possible to find the figure of the double in myths and legends. The issue of the double emphaszses the contradictory character of the human being and invokes a sinister dimension of the psychological world, what has been called in (...)
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  16.  76
    Abraham Sesshu Roth (2000). What Was Hume's Problem with Personal Identity? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (1):91-114.
    An appreciation of Hume’s psychology of object identity allows us to recognize certain tensions in his discussion of the origin of our belief in personal identity---tensions which have gone largely unnoticed in the secondary literature. This will serve to provide a new solution to the problem of explaining why Hume finds that discussion of personal identity so problematic when he famously disavows it in the Appendix to the Treatise. It turns out that the two psychological mechanisms (...)
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  17.  1
    J. Barnes (2002). Africanizing Anthropology: Fieldwork, Networks, and the Making of Cultural Knowledge in Central Africa. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 93:336-337.
    The Rhodes‐Livingstone Institute , founded in Northern Rhodesia in 1937, was the first social science research institute in Africa. This book is a history of the RLI from its earliest beginnings with emphasis on the years up to 1960. The author, who identifies herself as a historian, supplemented her archival research with periods of fieldwork mainly devoted to oral history but including shorter spells of anthropological participant observation in association with African assistants employed by the institute. She is therefore well (...)
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  18.  20
    Ole Dreier (1999). Personal Trajectories of Participation Across Contexts of Social Practice. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 1 (1):5-32.
    In discussion about basic theoretical approaches in a non-Cartesian psychology several candidates for a key concept were proposed, such as action, activity, relation, dialogue and discourse. None of these concepts, however, sufficiently grounds psychological theories of individual psychology in social practice. To accomplish this we need to conceptualize subjects as participants in structures of ongoing social practice. In this paper I argue why and address issues of subjectivity as encountered by persons in their participation in complex structures of social practice. (...)
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  19.  39
    Jennifer Ann Bates (2010). Hegel and Shakespeare on Moral Imagination. State University of New York Press.
    A Hegelian reading of good and bad luck -- In Shakespearean drama (phen. of spirit, King Lear, Othello, Hamlet, a Midsummer night's dream) -- Tearing the fabric: Hegel's Antigone, Shakespeare's Coriolanus, and kinship-state conflict (phen. of spirit c. 6, Judith Butler's Antigone, Coriolanus) -- Aufhebung and anti-aufhebung: geist and ghosts in Hamlet (phen. of spirit, Hamlet) -- The problem of genius in King Lear: Hegel on the feeling soul and the tragedy of wonder (anthropology and psychology in the encyclopaedia, Philosophy (...)
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  20.  33
    Kevin de Laplante (2004). Toward a More Expansive Conception of Ecological Science. Biology and Philosophy 19 (2):263-281.
    There are two competing conceptions of the nature and domain of ecological science in the popular and academic literature, an orthodox conception and a more expansive conception. The orthodox conception conceives ecology as a natural biological science distinct from the human social sciences. The more expansive conception views ecology as a science whose domain properly spans both the natural and social sciences. On the more expansive conception, non-traditional ecological disciplines such as ecological psychology , ecological anthropology and ecological economics (...)
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  21. Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.) (2015). The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case Against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Because every single one of us will die, most of us would like to know what—if anything—awaits us afterward, not to mention the fate of lost loved ones. Given the nearly universal vested interest we personally have in deciding this question in favor of an afterlife, it is no surprise that the vast majority of books on the topic affirm the reality of life after death without a backward glance. But the evidence of our senses and the ever-gaining strength of (...)
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  22. Paul C. Vitz & Susan M. Felch (eds.) (2006). The Self: Beyond the Postmodern Crisis. Isi Books.
    The peculiar dilemma of the self in our era has been noted by a wide range of writers, even as they have emphasized different aspects of that dilemma, such as the self’s alienation, disorientation, inflation, or fragmentation. In The Self: Beyond the Postmodern Crisis, Paul C. Vitz and Susan M. Felch bring together scholars from the disciplines of psychology, philosophy, theology, literature, biology, and physics to address the inadequacies of modern and postmodern selves and, ultimately, to suggest what an (...)
     
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  23.  8
    Robert N. McCauley (1993). Brainwork: A Review of Paul Churchland's a Neurocomputational Perspective. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 6 (1):81 – 96.
    Taking inspiration from developments in neurocomputational modeling, Paul Church-land develops his positions in the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of science. Concerning the former, Churchland relaxes his eliminativism at various points and seems to endorse a traditional identity account of sensory qualia. Although he remains unsympathetic to folk psychology, he no longer seeks the elimination of normative epistemology, but rather its transformation to a philosophical enterprise informed by current developments in the relevant sciences. Churchland supplies suggestive discussions of (...)
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  24.  78
    JeeLoo Liu (2008). From Realizer Functionalism to Nonreductive Physicalism. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 42:149-160.
    It has been noted in recent literature (e.g., Ross & Spurrett 2004, Kim 2006, McLaughlin 2006 and Cohen 2005) that functionalism can be separated into two varieties: one that emphasizes the role state, the other that emphasizes the realizer state. The former is called “role functionalism” while the latter has been called “realizer functionalism” (Ross & Spurrett 2004, Kim 2006, Cohen 2005) or “filler functionalism” (McLaughlin 2006). The separation between role functionalism and realizer functionalism mars the distinction traditionally made (...)
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  25.  24
    Matthew Noah Smith (2010). Practical Imagination and its Limits. Philosophers' Imprint 10 (3):1-20.
    It is common to talk about options, where an option is a course of action an agent can take. A course of action, in turn, is that which can be the object of intention. It has not often been noticed in the literature, though, that there are two ways to understand what makes something an option: first, an option just is some course of action physically open (or, to be maximally liberal, logically open) to an agent; second, an option (...)
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  26.  2
    Kathleen V. Wilkes (1980). More Brain Lesions: Kathleen V. Wilkes. Philosophy 55 (214):455-470.
    As philosophers of mind we seem to hold in common no very clear view about the relevance that work in psychology or the neurosciences may or may not have to our own favourite questions—even if we call the subject ‘philosophical psychology’. For example, in the literature we find articles on pain some of which do, some of which don't, rely more or less heavily on, for example, the work of Melzack and Wall; the puzzle cases used so extensively in (...)
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  27.  18
    Stephen Vider (2004). Rethinking Crowd Violence: Self-Categorization Theory and the Woodstock 1999 Riot. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 34 (2):141–166.
    According to self-categorization theory , incidents of crowd violence can be understood as discrete forms of social action, limited by the crowd's social identity. Through an analysis of the riot at Woodstock 1999, this paper explores the uses and limitations of SCT in order to reach a more complex psychology of crowd behavior, particularly those instances that appear unmotivated, irrational, and destructive. Psychological and sociological literature are synthesized to explore the role of communication in establishing social norms within (...)
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  28.  2
    Eugene Taylor (2010). Who Was Frederic William Henry Myers? Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (11-12):11-12.
    The scientific study of consciousness in the late 19th century, which took place in Western countries across disciplines such as neurology, physiology, neuropathology, psychology, psychiatry and philosophy, appears to have striking parallels to current crossdisciplinary developments in the neurosciences. The 19th century period, however, has received little scholarly attention from historians of medicine, psychology, or science. Historians of depth psychology have investigated the area as part of the history of psychiatry, but cleaved most closely to the versions presented by early (...)
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  29. Jonathan Glover (2014). Alien Landscapes? Interpreting Disordered Minds. Harvard University Press.
    We have made huge progress in understanding the biology of mental illnesses, but comparatively little in interpreting them at the psychological level. The eminent philosopher Jonathan Glover believes that there is real hope of progress in the human interpretation of disordered minds. -/- The challenge is that the inner worlds of people with psychiatric disorders can seem strange, like alien landscapes, and this strangeness can deter attempts at understanding. Do people with disorders share enough psychology with other people to make (...)
     
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  30. Francis Jeffry Pelletier (ed.) (2009). Kinds, Things and Stuff: Mass Terms and Generics. Oxford University Press Usa.
    A generic statement is a type of generalization that is made by asserting that a "kind" has a certain property. For example we might hear that marshmallows are sweet. Here, we are talking about the "kind" marshmallow and assert that individual instances of this kind have the property of being sweet. Almost all of our common sense knowledge about the everyday world is put in terms of generic statements. What can make these generic sentences be true even when there are (...)
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  31. David A. Jopling (2000). Self-Knowledge and the Self. Routledge.
    In this clear and reasoned discussion of self- knowledge and the self, the author asks whether it is really possible to know ourselves as we really are. He illuminates issues about the nature of self-identity which are of fundamental importance in moral psychology, epistemology and literary criticism. Jopling focuses on the accounts of Stuart Hampshire, Jean-Paul Sartre and Richard Rorty, and dialogical philosophical psychology and illustrates his argument with examples from literature, drama and psychology.
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  32.  5
    Irving Velody & Robin Williams (eds.) (1998). The Politics of Constructionism. Sage Publications.
    The Politics of Constructionism presents a broadranging and critical overview of the many themes of social constructionism and its relevance to contemporary social and political issues. Clearly structured and bringing together leading international contributors from across the social sciences, it offers an invaluable may through this rich body of literature. Major questions and topics explored in its critique and application of constructionist ideas include the theory and practice of scientific method, the development of social and political policy, the use (...)
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  33. Brandon N. Towl (2011). Mind-Brain Correlations, Identity, and Neuroscience. Philosophical Psychology 25 (2):187 - 202.
    One of the positive arguments for the type-identity theory of mental states is an inference-to-the-best-explanation (IBE) argument, which purports to show that type-identity theory is likely true since it is the best explanation for the correlations between mental states and brain states that we find in the neurosciences. But given the methods of neuroscience, there are other relations besides identity that can explain such correlations. I illustrate some of these relations by examining the literature on the (...)
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  34.  47
    Nick Crossley (2001). The Social Body: Habit, Identity and Desire. Sage.
    This book explores both the embodied nature of social life and the social nature of human bodily life. It provides an accessible review of the contemporary social science debates on the body, and develops a coherent new perspective. Nick Crossley critically reviews the literature on mind and body, and also on the body and society. He draws on theoretical insights from the work of Gilbert Ryle, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, George Herbert Mead and Pierre Bourdieu, and shows how the work of (...)
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  35.  65
    Barry F. Dainton (1996). Survival and Experience. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 96 (1):17 - 36.
    (Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, 1996: 17-36) I If I am to survive until some later date, what must happen, and what must not happen, over the intervening period? I am talking here about survival in the strict sense. Take an earlier and a later person, if they are one and the same, what is it about them that makes this so? In addressing this question the preferred tool has long been the exploitation of imaginary or science fiction cases. We (...)
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  36.  42
    David Lumsden (2013). Whole Life Narratives and the Self. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (1):1-10.
    Narrative theory provides an interesting contribution to the rich philosophical literature on the self and personal identity. This links with psychological and psychiatric themes concerning the self, because many cases of disorder involve some kind of loss or fragmentation of the self. What follows is a philosophical inquiry into these narrative theories, which should have some implications for how we should regard subjects with these disorders. My primary philosophical conclusion is that there is an interesting germ of truth (...)
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  37. Stephen E. Braude (1996). Multiple Personality and Moral Responsibility. Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 3 (1):37-54.
    The philosophical literature on multiple personality has focused primarily on problems about personal identity and psychological explanation. But multiple personality and other dissociative phenomena raise equally important and even more urgent questions about moral responsibility, in particular: In what respect(s) and to what extent should a multiple be held responsible for the actions of his/her alternate personalities? Cases of dreaming help illustrate why attributions of responsibility in cases of dissociation do not turn on putative changes in identity, (...)
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  38.  25
    Fredrik Svenaeus (2013). Anorexia Nervosa and the Body Uncanny: A Phenomenological Approach. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (1):81-91.
    Anorexia nervosa is a psychiatric disorder that seems to be closely related to the identity of the person suffering from it. This is referred to in the vast literature on anorexia nervosa by specifying the quality of symptoms as ‘egosyntonic’ (e.g., Vitousek, Watson, and Wilson 1998). The pursuit of excessive thinness is part of a search for identity in which the control of the body—its size and needs—becomes central (Gillett 2009). This need for control seems to be (...)
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  39.  7
    Peter D. Ashworth (1997). The Meaning of Participation. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 28 (1):82-103.
    Though there are few more pervasive features of the social world than the ebb and flow of individual participation, the literature only provides hints as to its phenomenology. The phenomenological investigation of social participation presented in this paper indicates that it essentially entails: 1. Attunement to the others' "stock of knowledge at hand" . 2. Emotional and motivational attunement to the group's concerns. 3. Taking for granted that one can contribute appropriately. 4. Being able to assume that one's (...) is not under threat. Though the implications can only be touched on in this paper, the phenomenological clarification of participation is a valuable resource, grounding many lines of research of contemporary significance-for instance, in education and the other "person professions" and in social policy and political science-and suggesting fruitful new perspectives. (shrink)
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