Search results for 'Identity (Psychology) in literature' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Gerald Izenberg (2008). Identity Becomes an Issue: European Literature in the 1920s. Modern Intellectual History 5 (2):279-307.score: 129.0
    The meaning of in its contemporary sense of or what is of relatively recent vintage. It became current as a concept of individual and group psychology only through Erik Erikson's work in the 1950s and its extension to collectivities in the social and political upheavals of the 1960s. But an important strand of European literature began calling the possibility of fixed self-definition into question in the 1920s, occasionally even deploying the word explicitly. In the work of Hermann Hesse, Virginia (...)
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  2. Blakey Vermeule (2000). The Party of Humanity: Writing Moral Psychology in Eighteenth-Century Britain. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 126.0
    What is the relationship between the self and society? Where do moral judgments come from? As Blakey Vermeule demonstrates in The Party of Humanity, such questions about sociability and moral philosophy were central to eighteenth-century writers and artists. Vermeule focuses on a group of aesthetically complicated moral texts: Alexander Pope's character sketches and Dunciad , Samuel Johnson's Life of Savage, and David Hume's self-consciously theatrical writings on pride and his autobiographical writings on religious melancholia. These writers and their characters confronted (...)
     
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  3. Roy Porter (ed.) (1997). Rewriting the Self: Histories From the Renaissance to the Present. Routledge.score: 116.0
    Rewriting the Self is an exploration of ideas of the self in the western cultural tradition from the Renaissance to the present. The contributors analyze different religious, philosophical, psychological, political, psychoanalytical and literary models of personal identity from a number of viewpoints, including the history of ideas, contemporary gender politics, and post-modernist literary theory. Challenging the received version of the "ascent of western man," they assess the discursive construction of the self in the light of political, technological and social (...)
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  4. Paul Cooke & Helen Vassallo (eds.) (2009). Alienation and Alterity: Otherness in Modern and Contemporary Francophone Contexts. Peter Lang.score: 114.0
    The essays in this collection, which derive from the conference 'Alienation and Alterity: Otherness in Modern and Contemporary Francophone Contexts', held at the University of Exeter in September 2007, explore various aspects of this ...
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  5. Pierre Marie Beaude & Jacques Fantino (eds.) (2010). Identité Et Altérité: La Norme En Question?: Hommage à Pierre-Marie Beaude. Université Paul-Verlaine, Centre de Recherche Écritures.score: 102.0
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  6. Daniel Kolak (1993). The Metaphysics and Metapsychology of Personal Identity: Why Thought Experiments Matter in Deciding Who We Are. American Philosophical Quarterly 30 (1):39-50.score: 94.0
    What are the metaphysical and metapsychological boundaries of a person? How do we draw our borders? This much is clear: personal identity without thought experiments is impossible. I develop a new way of conceptualizing physiological and psychological borders leading to a re-evaluation of the problem of personal identity within the contemporary literature, especially Parfit, arguing that we must, necessarily, turn to the conceptual analysis of metaphysical and metapsychological borders. I offer an explanation of the persistence of common (...)
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  7. Joelle Carpentier & Roxane de la Sablonnière (2013). Identity Profiles and Well-Being of Multicultural Immigrants: The Case of Canadian Immigrants Living in Quebec. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 89.5
    Studies worldwide point toward increased risk of mental health issues among immigrants. Immigrants’ ability to integrate the cultural identity of their new country has been found to be a key factor in their psychological well-being. Even though researchers agree on the crucial role of identity integration in immigrants’ well-being, the current literature has two main limitations: 1) researchers do not agree on the importance that should be allocated to each of the cultural identities, and 2) research has (...)
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  8. Patrizia D'Ettorre Nick Bos (2012). Recognition of Social Identity in Ants. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 75.0
    Recognizing the identity of others, from the individual to the group level, is a hallmark of society. Ants, and other social insects, have evolved advanced societies characterized by efficient social recognition systems. Colony identity is mediated by colony specific signature mixtures, a blend of hydrocarbons present on the cuticle of every individual (the “label”). Recognition occurs when an ant encounters another individual, and compares the label it perceives to an internal representation of its own colony odor (the “template”). (...)
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  9. Gary D. Fireman, T. E. McVay & Owen J. Flanagan (eds.) (2003). Narrative and Consciousness: Literature, Psychology and the Brain. Oxford University Press.score: 63.0
    We define our conscious experience by constructing narratives about ourselves and the people with whom we interact. Narrative pervades our lives--conscious experience is not merely linked to the number and variety of personal stories we construct with each other within a cultural frame, but is subsumed by them. The claim, however, that narrative constructions are essential to conscious experience is not useful or informative unless we can also begin to provide a distinct, organized, and empirically consistent explanation for narrative in (...)
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  10. Raymond Martin (1998). Self-Concern: An Experiential Approach to What Matters in Survival. Cambridge University Press.score: 63.0
    This book is a major contribution to the philosophical literature on the nature of the self, personal identity, and survival. Its distinctive methodology is one that is phenomenologically descriptive rather than metaphysical and normative. On the basis of this approach Raymond Martin shows that the distinction between self and other is not nearly as fundamental a feature of our so-called egoistic values as has been traditionally thought. He explains how the belief in a self as a fixed, continuous (...)
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  11. Javier Saavedra Macías & Rafael Velez Núñez (2011). The Other Self: Psychopathology and Literature. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):257-267.score: 61.5
    The figure of the “double” or the other self is an important topic in the history of literature. Many centuries before Jean Paul Richter coined the term, “doppelgänger,” at the beginning of the Romantic Movement in the year 1796, it is possible to find the figure of the double in myths and legends. The issue of the double emphaszses the contradictory character of the human being and invokes a sinister dimension of the psychological world, what has been called in (...)
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  12. Jennifer Ann Bates (2010). Hegel and Shakespeare on Moral Imagination. State University of New York Press.score: 55.5
    A Hegelian reading of good and bad luck -- In Shakespearean drama (phen. of spirit, King Lear, Othello, Hamlet, a Midsummer night's dream) -- Tearing the fabric: Hegel's Antigone, Shakespeare's Coriolanus, and kinship-state conflict (phen. of spirit c. 6, Judith Butler's Antigone, Coriolanus) -- Aufhebung and anti-aufhebung: geist and ghosts in Hamlet (phen. of spirit, Hamlet) -- The problem of genius in King Lear: Hegel on the feeling soul and the tragedy of wonder (anthropology and psychology in the encyclopaedia, Philosophy (...)
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  13. Ole Dreier (1999). Personal Trajectories of Participation Across Contexts of Social Practice. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 1 (1):5-32.score: 55.5
    In discussion about basic theoretical approaches in a non-Cartesian psychology several candidates for a key concept were proposed, such as action, activity, relation, dialogue and discourse. None of these concepts, however, sufficiently grounds psychological theories of individual psychology in social practice. To accomplish this we need to conceptualize subjects as participants in structures of ongoing social practice. In this paper I argue why and address issues of subjectivity as encountered by persons in their participation in complex structures of social practice. (...)
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  14. Kevin de Laplante (2004). Toward a More Expansive Conception of Ecological Science. Biology and Philosophy 19 (2):263-281.score: 54.0
    There are two competing conceptions of the nature and domain of ecological science in the popular and academic literature, an orthodox conception and a more expansive conception. The orthodox conception conceives ecology as a natural biological science distinct from the human social sciences. The more expansive conception views ecology as a science whose domain properly spans both the natural and social sciences. On the more expansive conception, non-traditional ecological disciplines such as ecological psychology, ecological anthropology and ecological economics may (...)
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  15. Kevin de Laplante (2004). Toward a More Expansive Conception of Ecological Science. Biology and Philosophy 19 (2):263-281.score: 54.0
    There are two competing conceptions of the nature and domain of ecological science in the popular and academic literature, an orthodox conception and a more expansive conception. The orthodox conception conceives ecology as a natural biological science distinct from the human social sciences. The more expansive conception views ecology as a science whose domain properly spans both the natural and social sciences. On the more expansive conception, non-traditional ecological disciplines such as ecological psychology , ecological anthropology and ecological economics (...)
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  16. Hayley Darke, Joel S. Peterman, Sohee Park, Suresh Sundram & Olivia Carter (2013). Are Patients with Schizophrenia Impaired in Processing Non-Emotional Features of Human Faces? Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 54.0
    It is known that individuals with schizophrenia exhibit signs of impaired face processing, however, the exact perceptual and cognitive mechanisms underlying these deficits are yet to be elucidated. One possible source of confusion in the current literature is the methodological and conceptual inconsistencies that can arise from the varied treatment of different aspects of face processing relating to emotional and non-emotional aspects of face perception. This review aims to disentangle the literature by focusing on the performance of patients (...)
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  17. Paul C. Vitz & Susan M. Felch (eds.) (2006). The Self: Beyond the Postmodern Crisis. Isi Books.score: 54.0
    The peculiar dilemma of the self in our era has been noted by a wide range of writers, even as they have emphasized different aspects of that dilemma, such as the self’s alienation, disorientation, inflation, or fragmentation. In The Self: Beyond the Postmodern Crisis, Paul C. Vitz and Susan M. Felch bring together scholars from the disciplines of psychology, philosophy, theology, literature, biology, and physics to address the inadequacies of modern and postmodern selves and, ultimately, to suggest what an (...)
     
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  18. Robert N. McCauley (1993). Brainwork: A Review of Paul Churchland's a Neurocomputational Perspective. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 6 (1):81 – 96.score: 51.0
    Taking inspiration from developments in neurocomputational modeling, Paul Church-land develops his positions in the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of science. Concerning the former, Churchland relaxes his eliminativism at various points and seems to endorse a traditional identity account of sensory qualia. Although he remains unsympathetic to folk psychology, he no longer seeks the elimination of normative epistemology, but rather its transformation to a philosophical enterprise informed by current developments in the relevant sciences. Churchland supplies suggestive discussions of (...)
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  19. JeeLoo Liu (2008). From Realizer Functionalism to Nonreductive Physicalism. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 42:149-160.score: 49.5
    It has been noted in recent literature (e.g., Ross & Spurrett 2004, Kim 2006, McLaughlin 2006 and Cohen 2005) that functionalism can be separated into two varieties: one that emphasizes the role state, the other that emphasizes the realizer state. The former is called “role functionalism” while the latter has been called “realizer functionalism” (Ross & Spurrett 2004, Kim 2006, Cohen 2005) or “filler functionalism” (McLaughlin 2006). The separation between role functionalism and realizer functionalism mars the distinction traditionally made (...)
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  20. Francis Jeffry Pelletier (ed.) (2009). Kinds, Things, and Stuff: Mass Terms and Generics. OUP USA.score: 48.0
    A generic statement is a type of generalization that is made by asserting that a "kind" has a certain property. For example we might hear that marshmallows are sweet. Here, we are talking about the "kind" marshmallow and assert that individual instances of this kind have the property of being sweet. Almost all of our common sense knowledge about the everyday world is put in terms of generic statements. What can make these generic sentences be true even when there are (...)
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  21. Matthew Noah Smith (2010). Practical Imagination and its Limits. Philosophers' Imprint 10 (3):1-20.score: 48.0
    It is common to talk about options, where an option is a course of action an agent can take. A course of action, in turn, is that which can be the object of intention. It has not often been noticed in the literature, though, that there are two ways to understand what makes something an option: first, an option just is some course of action physically open (or, to be maximally liberal, logically open) to an agent; second, an option (...)
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  22. Irving Velody & Robin Williams (eds.) (1998). The Politics of Constructionism. Sage Publications.score: 48.0
    The Politics of Constructionism presents a broadranging and critical overview of the many themes of social constructionism and its relevance to contemporary social and political issues. Clearly structured and bringing together leading international contributors from across the social sciences, it offers an invaluable may through this rich body of literature. Major questions and topics explored in its critique and application of constructionist ideas include the theory and practice of scientific method, the development of social and political policy, the use (...)
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  23. Kathleen Taylor (2009). Cruelty: Human Evil and the Human Brain. OUP Oxford.score: 48.0
    In this thoughtful exploration of a painful subject, Kathleen Taylor seeks to bring together the fruits of work in psychology, sociology, and her own field of neuroscience to shed light on the nature of cruelty and what makes human beings cruel. The question of cruelty is inevitably tied to questions of moral philosophy, the nature of evil, free will and responsibility. Taylor's approach is ambitious, but little work has been done in this area and this wide-ranging discussion, considering the roles (...)
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  24. Nicole A. Roberts & Mary H. Burleson (2013). Processes Linking Cultural Ingroup Bonds and Mental Health: The Roles of Social Connection and Emotion Regulation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 45.0
    Cultural and ethnic identities influence the relationships individuals seek out and how they feel and behave in these relationships, which can strongly affect mental and physical health through their impacts on emotions, physiology, and behavior. We proposed and tested a model in which ethnocultural identifications and ingroup affiliations were hypothesized explicitly to enhance social connectedness, which would in turn promote expectancy for effective regulation of negative emotions and reduce self-reported symptoms of depression and anxiety. Our sample comprised women aged 18 (...)
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  25. Danielle Sulikowski Darren Burke (2013). The Evolution of Holistic Processing of Faces. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 45.0
    In this paper we examine the holistic processing of faces from an evolutionary perspective, clarifying what such an approach entails, and evaluating the extent to which the evidence currently available permits any strong conclusions. While it seems clear that the holistic processing of faces depends on mechanisms evolved to perform that task, our review of the comparative literature reveals that there is currently insufficient evidence (or sometimes insufficiently compelling evidence) to decide when in our evolutionary past such processing may (...)
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  26. Brandon N. Towl (2011). Mind-Brain Correlations, Identity, and Neuroscience. Philosophical Psychology 25 (2):187 - 202.score: 39.0
    One of the positive arguments for the type-identity theory of mental states is an inference-to-the-best-explanation (IBE) argument, which purports to show that type-identity theory is likely true since it is the best explanation for the correlations between mental states and brain states that we find in the neurosciences. But given the methods of neuroscience, there are other relations besides identity that can explain such correlations. I illustrate some of these relations by examining the literature on the (...)
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  27. Claus-Christian Carbon Tilo Strobach (2013). Face Adaptation Effects: Reviewing the Impact of Adapting Information, Time, and Transfer. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 39.0
    The ability to adapt is essential to live and survive in an ever-changing environment such as the human ecosystem. Here we review the literature on adaptation effects of face stimuli to give an overview of existing findings in this area, highlight gaps in its research literature, initiate new directions in face adaptation research and help to design future adaptation studies. Furthermore, this review should lead to better understanding of the processing characteristics as well as the mental representations of (...)
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  28. David Lumsden (2013). Whole Life Narratives and the Self. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (1):1-10.score: 37.0
    Narrative theory provides an interesting contribution to the rich philosophical literature on the self and personal identity. This links with psychological and psychiatric themes concerning the self, because many cases of disorder involve some kind of loss or fragmentation of the self. What follows is a philosophical inquiry into these narrative theories, which should have some implications for how we should regard subjects with these disorders. My primary philosophical conclusion is that there is an interesting germ of truth (...)
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  29. Nick Crossley (2001). The Social Body: Habit, Identity and Desire. Sage.score: 36.0
    This book explores both the embodied nature of social life and the social nature of human bodily life. It provides an accessible review of the contemporary social science debates on the body, and develops a coherent new perspective. Nick Crossley critically reviews the literature on mind and body, and also on the body and society. He draws on theoretical insights from the work of Gilbert Ryle, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, George Herbert Mead and Pierre Bourdieu, and shows how the work of (...)
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  30. Barry F. Dainton (1996). Survival and Experience. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 96:17 - 36.score: 33.0
    (Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, 1996: 17-36) I If I am to survive until some later date, what must happen, and what must not happen, over the intervening period? I am talking here about survival in the strict sense. Take an earlier and a later person, if they are one and the same, what is it about them that makes this so? In addressing this question the preferred tool has long been the exploitation of imaginary or science fiction cases. We (...)
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  31. Mark Holden, Era Buck, Mark Clark, Karen Szauter & Julie Trumble (2012). Professional Identity Formation in Medical Education: The Convergence of Multiple Domains. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 24 (4):245-255.score: 31.5
    There has been increasing emphasis on professionalism in medical education over the past several decades, initially focusing on bioethical principles, communication skills, and behaviors of medical students and practitioners. Authors have begun to discuss professional identity formation (PIF), distinguishing it as the foundational process one experiences during the transformation from lay person to physician. This integrative developmental process involves the establishment of core values, moral principles, and self-awareness. The literature has approached PIF from various paradigms—professionalism, psychological ego development, (...)
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  32. Fredrik Svenaeus (2013). Anorexia Nervosa and the Body Uncanny: A Phenomenological Approach. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (1):81-91.score: 30.0
    Anorexia nervosa is a psychiatric disorder that seems to be closely related to the identity of the person suffering from it. This is referred to in the vast literature on anorexia nervosa by specifying the quality of symptoms as ‘egosyntonic’ (e.g., Vitousek, Watson, and Wilson 1998). The pursuit of excessive thinness is part of a search for identity in which the control of the body—its size and needs—becomes central (Gillett 2009). This need for control seems to be (...)
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  33. Sophie Berjot & Nicolas Gillet (2011). Stress and Coping with Discrimination and Stigmatization. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 30.0
    The aim of this article is to briefly review the literature on stigmatization and more generally identity threats, to focus more specifically of the way people appraise and cope with those threatening situations. Based on the transactional model of stress and coping (Lazarus and Folkman, 1984), we propose a model of coping with identity threats that takes into accounts the principle characteristic of stigma, its devaluing aspect. We present a model with specific antecedents, a refined appraisal phase (...)
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  34. Laura Klaming & Pim Haselager (2013). Did My Brain Implant Make Me Do It? Questions Raised by DBS Regarding Psychological Continuity, Responsibility for Action and Mental Competence. Neuroethics 6 (3):527-539.score: 28.0
    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a well-accepted treatment for movement disorders and is currently explored as a treatment option for various neurological and psychiatric disorders. Several case studies suggest that DBS may, in some patients, influence mental states critical to personality to such an extent that it affects an individual’s personal identity, i.e. the experience of psychological continuity, of persisting through time as the same person. Without questioning the usefulness of DBS as a treatment option for various serious and (...)
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  35. Albrecht Classen (ed.) (2010). Laughter in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Times: Epistemology of a Fundamental Human Behavior, its Meaning, and Consequences. Walter de Gruyter.score: 28.0
    Introduction: Laughter as an expression of human nature in the Middle Ages and the early modern period: literary, historical, theological, philosophical, and psychological reflections -- Judith Hagen. Laughter in Procopius's wars -- Livnat Holtzman. "Does God really laugh?": appropriate and inappropriate descriptions of God in Islamic traditionalist theology -- Daniel F. Pigg. Laughter in Beowulf: ambiguity, ambivalence, and group identity formation -- Mark Burde. The parodia sacra problem and medieval comic studies -- Olga V. Trokhimenko. Women's laughter and gender (...)
     
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  36. Huiyuhl Yi (2010). Non-Branching Clause. Metaphysica 11 (2):191-210.score: 25.0
    The central claim of the Parfitian psychological approach to personal identity is that the fact about personal identity is underpinned by a non-branching psychological continuity relation. Hence, for the advocates of the Parfitian view, it is important to understand what it is for a relation to take or not take a branching form. Nonetheless, very few attempts have been made in the literature of personal identity to define the non-branching clause. This paper undertakes this task. Drawing (...)
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  37. David Barrett (2013). Multiple Realizability, Identity Theory, and the Gradual Reorganization Principle. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (2):325-346.score: 21.5
    In the literature on multiple realizability and the identity theory, cases of neural plasticity have enjoyed a very limited role. The present article attempts to remedy this small influence by arguing that clinical and experimental evidence of quite extensive neural reorganization offers compelling support for the claim that psychological kinds are multiply realized in neurological kinds, thus undermining the identity theory. In particular, cases are presented where subjects with no measurable psychological deficits also have vast, though gradually (...)
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  38. Daniel K. Lapsley (1996). Moral Psychology. Westview Press.score: 21.0
    Moral functioning is a defining feature of human personhood and human social life. Moral Psychology provides an integrative and evaluative overview of the theoretical and empirical traditions that have attempted to make sense of moral cognition, prosocial behavior, and the development of virtuous character.This is the first book to integrate a comprehensive review of the psychological literatures with allied traditions in ethics. Moral rationality and decisionmaking; the development of the sense of fairness and justice, and of prosocial dispositions; as well (...)
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  39. Kim Atkins & Catriona Mackenzie (eds.) (2008). Practical Identity and Narrative Agency. Routledge.score: 21.0
    The essays collected in this volume address a range of issues that arise when the focus of philosophical reflection on identity is shifted from metaphysical to practical and evaluative concerns. They also explore the usefulness of the notion of narrative for articulating and responding to these issues. The chapters, written by an outstanding roster of international scholars, address a range of complex philosophical issues concerning the relationship between practical and metaphysical identity, the embodied dimensions of the first-personal perspective, (...)
     
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  40. Alexander R. Pruss (2012). A Deflationary Theory Of Diachronic Identity. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (1):19 - 37.score: 19.0
    Substantive theories of diachronic identity have been offered for different kinds of entities. The kind of entity whose diachronic identity has received the most attention in the literature is person, where such theories as the psychological theory, the body theory, the soul theory, and animalism have been defended. At the same time, Wittgenstein's remark that ?to say of two things that they are identical is nonsense, and to say of one thing that it is identical with itself (...)
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  41. J. Smith, W. Shields & D. Washburn (2003). The Comparative Psychology of Uncertainty Monitoring and Metacognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):317-339.score: 19.0
    Researchers have begun to explore animals' capacities for uncertainty monitoring and metacognition. This exploration could extend the study of animal self-awareness and establish the relationship of self-awareness to other-awareness. It could sharpen descriptions of metacognition in the human literature and suggest the earliest roots of metacognition in human development. We summarize research on uncertainty monitoring by humans, monkeys, and a dolphin within perceptual and metamemory tasks. We extend phylogenetically the search for metacognitive capacities by considering studies that have tested (...)
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  42. Robert Welsh Jordan (2001). Hartmann, Schutz, and the Hermeneutics of Action. Axiomathes 12 (3-4):327-338.score: 18.0
    Hartmann's way of conceiving what he terms "the actual ought-to-be [aktuales Seinsollen]" offers a fruitful approach to crucial issues in the phenomenology of action. The central issue to be dealt with concerns the description of the "constitution" of anticipated possibilities as projects for action. Such potentialities are termed "problematic possibilities" and are contrasted with "open possibilities" in most of the works published by Husserl as well as those published by Alfred Schutz. The description given by Alfred Schutz emphasized that the (...)
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  43. Frederic Gilbert (2012). The Burden of Normality: From 'Chronically Ill' to 'Symptom Free'. New Ethical Challenges for Deep Brain Stimulation Postoperative Treatment. Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (7):408-412.score: 18.0
    Although an invasive medical intervention, Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) has been regarded as an efficient and safe treatment of Parkinson’s disease for the last 20 years. In terms of clinical ethics, it is worth asking whether the use of DBS may have unanticipated negative effects similar to those associated with other types of psychosurgery. Clinical studies of epileptic patients who have undergone an anterior temporal lobectomy have identified a range of side effects and complications in a number of domains: psychological, (...)
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  44. Tom L. Beauchamp (1999). Hume on the Nonhuman Animal. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (4):322 – 335.score: 16.0
    Hume wrote about fundamental similarities and dissimilarities between human and nonhuman animals. His work was centered on the cognitive and emotional lives of animals, rather than their moral or legal standing, but his theories have implications for issues of moral standing. The historical background of these controversies reaches to ancient philosophy and to several prominent figures in early modern philosophy. Hume develops several of the themes in this literature. His underlying method is analogical arg ument and his conclusions are (...)
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  45. Ingar Brinck, Persons, Ontology, Methodology, Values.score: 16.0
    So-called “Wide Psychological Reductionism”, and similar neo-Lockean views of personal identity, are both important and popular. Yet they seem to demand of their adherents commitment to controversial views both in ontology and in philosophical methodology. The consequent debates interweave methodological, ontological, and evaluative issues in interesting ways. We will examine some of these issues, and explore some of the more recent developments and transformations which Psychological views have led to. The focus will be selective and we will look only (...)
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  46. Andrew Fenton (2013). Neuroscience and the Problem of Other Animal Minds: Why It May Not Matter So Much for Neuroethics. The Monist 95 (3):463-485.score: 16.0
    A recent argument in the neuroethics literature has suggested that brain-mental-state identities (one popular expression of what is commonly known as neuroreductionism) promise to settle epistemological uncertainties about nonhuman animal minds. What’s more, these brain-mental-state identities offer the further promise of dismantling the deadlock over the moral status of nonhuman animals, to positive affect in such areas as agriculture and laboratory animal science. I will argue that neuroscientific claims assuming brain-mental-state identities do not so much resolve the problem of (...)
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  47. Bill Puka (1990). The Liberation of Caring; A Different Voice for Gilligan's "Different Voice". Hypatia 5 (1):58 - 82.score: 16.0
    Recent literature portrays caring as a psychological, social, and ethical orientation associated with female gender identity. This essay focuses on Gilligan's influential view that "care" is a broad theme of moral development which is under-represented in dominant theories of human development such as Kohlberg's theory. An alternative hypothesis is proposed portraying care development as a set of circumscribed coping strategies tailored to dealing with sexism. While these strategies are practically effective and partially "liberated," from the moral point of (...)
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  48. Ron Eglash (2009). Oppositional Technophilia. Social Epistemology 23 (1):79-86.score: 16.0
    Technophilia has been routinely pathologized in the science and technology studies literature. It is variously framed as a type of dangerous psychological deviance, a form of spiritual deficit, and a source of social destruction. This essay seeks to reframe technophilia as a way of life no more pathological than homosexuality, atheism, or other traditionally disparaged identities, and to note how its oppositional forms—much like gay activism or atheist humanism—can be as politically helpful and ethically grounded as any other progressive (...)
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  49. Steven Hitlin & Glen H. Elder (2007). Time, Self, and the Curiously Abstract Concept of Agency. Sociological Theory 25 (2):170 - 191.score: 16.0
    The term "agency" is quite slippery and is used differently depending on the epistemological roots and goals of scholars who employ it. Distressingly, the sociological literature on the concept rarely addresses relevant social psychological research. We take a social behaviorist approach to agency by suggesting that individual temporal orientations are underutilized in conceptualizing this core sociological concept. Different temporal foci--the actor's engaged response to situational circumstances--implicate different forms of agency. This article offers a theoretical model involving four analytical types (...)
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