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  1. Joel Feinberg (1978). Psychological Egoism. In Russ Shafer-Landau & Joel Feinberg (eds.), Reason and Responsibility. Wadsworth 183.
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  2. Joel Feinberg (1986). Harm to Self. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  3. Joel Feinberg (1965). The Expressive Function of Punishment. The Monist 49 (3):397-423.
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  4.  12
    Joel Feinberg (1987). Harm to Others. Philosophical Review 96 (2):295-298.
    This first volume in the four-volume series The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law focuses on the "harm principle," the commonsense view that prevention of harm to persons other than the perpetrator is a legitimate purpose of criminal legislation. Feinberg presents a detailed analysis of the concept and definition of harm and applies it to a host of practical and theoretical issues, showing how the harm principle must be interpreted if it is to be a plausible guide to the lawmaker.
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  5. Joel Feinberg (2007). The Child's Right to an Open Future. In Randall R. Curren (ed.), Philosophy of Education: An Anthology. Blackwell Pub.
  6. Joel Feinberg (1968). Collective Responsibility. Journal of Philosophy 65 (21):674-688.
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  7. Joel Feinberg (1974). Noncomparative Justice. Philosophical Review 83 (3):297-338.
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  8. Joel Feinberg & Jan Narveson (1970). The Nature and Value of Rights. Journal of Value Inquiry 4 (4):243-260.
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  9.  28
    Joel Feinberg (1973). Social Philosophy. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.,Prentice-Hall.
  10. Joel Feinberg (1988). Harmless Wrongdoing. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    The final volume of Feinberg's four-volume work, The Moral Limits of Criminal Law examines the philosophical basis for the criminalization of so-called "victimless crimes" such as ticket scalping, blackmail, consented-to exploitation of others, commercial fortune telling, and consensual sexual relations.
     
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  11. Joel Feinberg (1986). Wrongful Life and the Counterfactual Element in Harming. Social Philosophy and Policy 4 (1):145.
    I shall be concerned in this paper with some philosophical puzzles raised by so-called “wrongful life” suits. These legal actions are obviously of great interest to lawyers and physicians, but philosophers might have a kind of professional interest in them too, since in a remarkably large number of them, judges have complained that the issues are too abstruse for the courts and belong more properly to philosophers and theologians. The issues that elicit this judicial frustration are those that require the (...)
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  12. Joel Feinberg (1970). Doing & Deserving; Essays in the Theory of Responsibility. Princeton, N.J.,Princeton University Press.
    Supererogation and rules.--Problematic responsibility in law and morals.--On being "morally speaking a murderer."--Justice and personal desert.--The expressive function of punishment.--Action and responsibility.--Causing voluntary actions.--Sua culpa.--Collective responsibility.--Crime, clutchability, and individuated treatment.--What is so special about mental illness?
     
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  13. Joel Feinberg (1984). The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.
    In this volume, Feinberg focuses on the meanings of "interest," the relationship between interests and wants, and the distinction between want-regarding and ideal-regarding analyses on interest and hard cases for the applications of the concept of harm. Examples of the "hard cases" are harm to character, vicarious harm, and prenatal and posthumous harm. Feinberg also discusses the relationship between harm and rights, the concept of a victim, and the distinctions of various quantitative dimensions of harm, consent, and offense, including the (...)
     
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  14. Joel Feinberg (1978). Voluntary Euthanasia and the Inalienable Right to Life. Philosophy and Public Affairs 7 (2):93-123.
  15.  90
    Joel Feinberg (1985). The Mistreatment of Dead Bodies. Hastings Center Report 15 (1):31-37.
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  16.  17
    Joel Feinberg (1994). Freedom and Fulfillment: Philosophical Essays. Princeton University Press.
    This collection concludes with two essays dealing with concepts used in appraising the whole of a person's life: absurdity and self-fulfillment, and their interplay.Dealing with a diverse set of problems in practical and theoretical ethics, ...
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  17. Joel Feinberg (1971). Legal Paternalism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 1 (1):105 - 124.
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  18. Joel Feinberg (1992). The Social Importance of Moral Rights. Philosophical Perspectives 6:175-198.
  19.  59
    Joel Feinberg (1980). Absurd Self-Fulfillment. In Peter van Inwagen (ed.), Time and Cause. D. Reidel 255--281.
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  20.  2
    Joel Feinberg (1982). Rights, Justice, and the Bounds of Liberty. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 43 (1):120-127.
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  21. Jeffrey Alexander & Joel Feinberg (1987). The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law, Vol 1. Harm to Others. Ethics 97 (2):414-440.
     
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  22. Joel Feinberg (1984). The Moral and Legal Responsibility of the Bad Samaritan. Criminal Justice Ethics 3 (1):56-69.
  23. Joel Feinberg (2003). Problems at the Roots of Law: Essays in Legal and Political Theory. Oxford University Press.
    Feinberg is one of the leading philosophers of law of the last forty years. This volume collects recent articles, both published and unpublished, on what he terms "basic questions" about the law, particularly in regard to the relationship to morality. Accessibly and elegantly written, this volume's audience will reflect the diverse nature of Feinberg's own interests: scholars in philosophy of law, legal theory, and ethical and moral theory.
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  24.  8
    Joel Feinberg (1987). Offense to Others. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 48 (1):147-153.
    The second volume in Joel Feinberg's series The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law, Offense to Others focuses on the "offense principle," which maintains that preventing shock, disgust, or revulsion is always a morally relevant reason for legal prohibitions. Feinberg clarifies the concept of an "offended mental state" and further contrasts the concept of offense with harm. He also considers the law of nuisance as a model for statutes creating "morals offenses," showing its inadequacy as a model for understanding "profound (...)
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  25.  17
    Joel Feinberg (1973). Duty and Obligation in the Non-Ideal World. Journal of Philosophy 70 (9):263-275.
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  26. Joel Feinberg & Jules L. Coleman (1999). Philosophy of Law. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  27.  87
    Joel Feinberg (1987). Some Unswept Debris From the Hart-Devlin Debate. Synthese 72 (2):249 - 275.
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  28. Joel Feinberg (1988). Harm to Self: The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law, Vol. 3. Law and Philosophy 7 (1):107-122.
     
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  29.  59
    Joel Feinberg (1966). Duties, Rights, and Claims. American Philosophical Quarterly 3 (2):137 - 144.
  30.  8
    Joel Feinberg (1989). Offense to Others: The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law. Philosophical Review 98 (2):239-242.
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  31.  78
    Joel Feinberg (1973). Some Conjectures About the Concept of Respect. Journal of Social Philosophy 4 (2):1-3.
  32.  75
    Joel Feinberg (1986). Harm to Others—a Rejoinder. Criminal Justice Ethics 5 (1):16-29.
  33.  3
    Joel Feinberg (1983). Rights, Justice, and the Bounds of Liberty: Essays in Social Philosophy. Philosophical Review 92 (3):438-442.
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  34.  23
    Joel Feinberg (1980). Legal Moralism and Freefloating Evils. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 61 (1/2):122.
    This article distinguishes and evaluates the various forms of legal moralism from a liberal vantage point. It devotes special attention to the most plausible form of the theory, That which is often called "the conservative thesis," and to that supporting argument which is based on the need to prevent "freefloating social-Change evils." freefloating evils are defined as evils that are imputable to human beings but which do not give rise to personal grievances as harms, Offenses, And "harmless exploitative injustices" do. (...)
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  35. Joel Feinberg (1989). Autonomy. In John Philip Christman (ed.), The Inner Citadel: Essays on Individual Autonomy. Oxford University Press 27--53.
     
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  36. Joel Feinberg & Hyman Gross (eds.) (1975). Philosophy of Law. Dickenson Pub. Co..
  37.  57
    Joel Feinberg (1961). Supererogation and Rules. Ethics 71 (4):276-288.
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  38.  17
    Joel Feinberg (1992). In Defence of Moral Rights. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 12 (2):149-169.
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  39. Joel Feinberg (1965). Action and Responsibility. In Max Black (ed.), Philosophy in America. Ithaca, N.Y.,Cornell University Press 134--160.
     
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  40.  57
    Joel Feinberg (1962). Problematic Responsibility in Law and Morals. Philosophical Review 71 (3):340-351.
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  41.  54
    Joel Feinberg (1991). Overlooking the Merits of the Individual Case: An Unpromising Approach to the Right to Die. Ratio Juris 4 (2):131-151.
    .One of the strongest arguments against the legalization of voluntary euthanasia is that even though a given suffering or comatose patient may have a moral right to die, legal recognition of the right would lead inevitably to mistakes and abuses in other cases. The flaw in this argument is the assumption that it is always and necessarily a greater evil to let someone die by mistake than to keep a person alive by mistake. In fact, we cannot plausibly say that (...)
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  42. Joel Feinberg (1971). Reason and Responsibility. Encino, Calif.,Dickenson Pub. Co..
    The book's clear organization structures selections so that readings complement each other guiding you through contrasting positions on key concepts in ...
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  43.  55
    Joel Feinberg (1983). Obscene Words and the Law. Law and Philosophy 2 (2):139 - 161.
    This paper asks whether the criminal law can have any legitimate concern with obscene language. At most, such a concern could be justified by the need to protect auditors from offense, since it is not plausible to think of exposure to dirty words as harmful or inherently immoral. A distinction is drawn between bare utterance and instant offense, on the one hand, and offensive nuisance and harassment, on the other. Only when obscene language is used to harass can it properly (...)
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    Joel Feinberg (1974). Doing and Deserving: Essays in the Theory of Responsibility. Journal of Philosophy 71 (3):90-96.
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  45.  32
    Joel Feinberg (1988). The Paradox of Blackmail. Ratio Juris 1 (1):83-95.
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  46.  25
    Joel Feinberg (1988). Responsibility for the Future. Philosophy Research Archives 14:93-113.
    Prospective ascription of responsibility is hypothetical, commonly noting or setting conditions for critical judgment or liability if some event occurs or fails to occur, thus determining vulnerability to retrospective judgments. Prospective liabilities can be classified by source, by type or degree (if any) of accompanying control, and by structure or stages.But not all prospective responsibility can be understood in terms of liability. Actual or de facto control over X and/or responsibility for Y (persons, animals, inanimate things, etc.), though they may (...)
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    Carl Wellman & Joel Feinberg (1970). Reasons for Breaking the Law. Journal of Value Inquiry 4 (4):261-272.
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  48.  9
    Joel Feinberg (1978). The Interest in Liberty on the Scales. In A. I. Goldman & I. Kim (eds.), Values and Morals. Boston: D. Reidel 21--35.
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  49. Joel Feinberg (1988). Harmless Wrongdoing: The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law, Vol. 4. Law and Philosophy 7 (3):395-404.
     
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  50. Joel Feinberg (1986). Offense to Others: The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law, Vol. 2. Law and Philosophy 5 (1):113-120.
     
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