Search results for 'Physics Influence' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Tricia Bertram Gallant, Michael G. Anderson & Christine Killoran (2013). Academic Integrity in a Mandatory Physics Lab: The Influence of Post-Graduate Aspirations and Grade Point Averages. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):219-235.score: 90.0
    Research on academic cheating by high school students and undergraduates suggests that many students will do whatever it takes, including violating ethical classroom standards, to not be left behind or to race to the top. This behavior may be exacerbated among pre-med and pre-health professional school students enrolled in laboratory classes because of the typical disconnect between these students, their instructors and the perceived legitimacy of the laboratory work. There is little research, however, that has investigated the relationship between high (...)
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  2. Tricia Bertram Gallant, Michael G. Anderson & Christine Killoran (2013). Academic Integrity in a Mandatory Physics Lab: The Influence of Post-Graduate Aspirations and Grade Point Averages. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):219-235.score: 90.0
    Research on academic cheating by high school students and undergraduates suggests that many students will do whatever it takes, including violating ethical classroom standards, to not be left behind or to race to the top. This behavior may be exacerbated among pre-med and pre-health professional school students enrolled in laboratory classes because of the typical disconnect between these students, their instructors and the perceived legitimacy of the laboratory work. There is little research, however, that has investigated the relationship between high (...)
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  3. Murad D. Akhundov (2005). Social Influence on Physics and Mathematics: Local or Attributive? [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 36 (1):135 - 149.score: 84.0
    The article is devoted to the nature of science. To what extent are science and mathematics affected by the society in which they are developed? Philosophy of science has accepted the social influence on science, but limits it only to the context of discovery (a "locational" approach). An opposite "attributive" approach states that any part of science may be so influenced. L. Graham is sure that even the mathematical equations at the core of fundamental physical theories may display social (...)
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  4. J. R. Leibowitz (2008). Hidden Harmony: The Connected Worlds of Physics and Art. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 84.0
    Most "art and science" books focus on the science of perspective or the psychology of perception. Hidden Harmony does not. Instead, the book addresses the surprising common ground between physics and art from a novel and personal perspective. Viewing the two disciplines as creative processes, J. R. Leibowitz supplements existing and original research with illustrations to demonstrate that physics and art share guiding aesthetics and compositional demands and to show how each speaks meaningfully to the other. Leibowitz widens (...)
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  5. Leonard Shlain (1991/1993). Art & Physics: Parallel Visions in Space, Time, and Light. Quill/W. Morrow.score: 84.0
    Art interprets the visible world, physics charts its unseen workings--making the two realms seem completely opposed. But in Art & Physics, Leonard Shlain tracks their breakthroughs side by side throughout history to reveal an astonishing correlation of visions. From teh classical Greek sculptors to Andy Warhol and Jasper Johns, and from Aristotle to Einstein, aritsts have foreshadowed the discoveries of scientists, such as when Money and Cezanne intuited the coming upheaval in physics that Einstein would initiate. In (...)
     
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  6. Paul Pojman (2011). The Influence of Biology and Psychology Upon Physics: Ernst Mach Revisited. Perspectives on Science 19 (2):121-135.score: 78.0
    The frequent excursions which I have made into this province have all sprung from the profound conviction that the foundations of science as a whole, and of physics in particular, await their next greatest elucidations from the side of biology, and especially, from the analysis of the sensations.Science stands thus in the midst of the natural process of evolution, and she can guide evolution in the proper direction and help it along, but never replace it.A broad foundation is laid (...)
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  7. Mendel Sachs (1970). Positivism, Realism, and Existentialism in Mach's Influence on Contemporary Physics. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 30 (3):403-420.score: 72.0
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  8. George Boys-Stones (2001). Theophrastus R. W. Sharples: Theophrastus of Eresus. Sources for His Life, Writings, Thought and Influence. Commentary Volume 3.1. Sources on Physics (Texts 137–223) . With Contributions on the Arabic Material by Dimitri Gutas. Pp. Xvii + 302. Leiden, Boston, and Cologne: Brill, 1998. Cased, $97. ISBN: 90-04-11130-1. P. Huby: Theophrastus of Eresus. Sources for His Life, Writings, Thought and Influence. Commentary Volume 4. Psychology (Texts 265–327) . With Contributions on the Arabic Material by Dimitri Gutas. Pp. Xvii + 252. Leiden, Boston, and Cologne: Brill, 1999. Cased, $86. ISBN: 90-04-11317-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 51 (01):31-.score: 72.0
  9. Han Baltussen & R. W. Sharples (2000). Theophrastus of Eresus: Sources for His Life, Writings, Thought and Influence. Commentary Vol. 3.1, Sources on Physics. Journal of Hellenic Studies 120:169.score: 72.0
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  10. De Laeter Jr (1989). The Influence of American and British Thought on Australian Physics Education. Science Education 73 (4):445-457.score: 72.0
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  11. Zahra Hazari, Robert H. Tai & Philip M. Sadler (2007). Gender Differences in Introductory University Physics Performance: The Influence of High School Physics Preparation and Affective Factors. Science Education 91 (6):847-876.score: 72.0
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  12. Susan M. Stocklmayer & David F. Treagust (1994). A Historical Analysis of Electric Currents in Textbooks: A Century of Influence on Physics Education. Science and Education 3 (2):131-154.score: 72.0
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  13. Kristina Rolin (1999). Can Gender Ideologies Influence the Practice of the Physical Sciences? Perspectives on Science 7 (4):510-533.score: 60.0
    : As a response to the critics of feminist science studies I argue that it is possible to formulate empirical hypotheses about gender ideology in the practice of the physical sciences without (1) reinforcing stereotypes about women and mathematical sciences or (2) assuming at the outset that the area of physics under investigation is methodologically suspect. I will then critically evaluate two case studies of gender ideology in the practice of the physical sciences. The case studies fail to show (...)
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  14. Robert Nadeau (1999). The Non-Local Universe: The New Physics and Matters of the Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    Classical physics states that physical reality is local--a point in space cannot influence another point beyond a relatively short distance. However, In 1997, experiments were conducted in which light particles (photons) originated under certain conditions and traveled in opposite directions to detectors located about seven miles apart. The amazing results indicated that the photons "interacted" or "communicated" with one another instantly or "in no time." Since a distance of seven miles is quite vast in quantum physics, this (...)
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  15. James T. Cushing (1998). Philosophical Concepts in Physics: The Historical Relation Between Philosophy and Scientific Theories. Cambridge University Press.score: 54.0
    This book examines a selection of philosophical issues in the context of specific episodes in the development of physical theories. Advances in science are presented against the historical and philosophical backgrounds in which they occurred. A major aim is to impress upon the reader the essential role that philosophical considerations have played in the actual practice of science. The book begins with some necessary introduction to the history of ancient and early modern science, with major emphasis being given to the (...)
     
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  16. Mary B. Hesse (1961/2005). Forces and Fields: The Concept of Action at a Distance in the History of Physics. Dover Publications.score: 54.0
    This history of physics focuses on the question, "How do bodies act on one another across space?" The variety of answers illustrates the function of fundamental analogies or models in physics as well as the role of so-called unobservable entities. Forces and Fields presents an in-depth look at the science of ancient Greece, and it examines the influence of antique philosophy on seventeenth-century thought. Additional topics embrace many elements of modern physics--the empirical basis of quantum mechanics, (...)
     
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  17. D. L. Schumacher (1974). Fundamental Physics and Instrumental Technology. Foundations of Physics 4 (4):481-497.score: 48.0
    The working situation prevailing in theoretical and experimental physics today is held to be inseparable from the interpretation of quantum theory, and constitutes an embodiment of its implicit difficulties. Such an understanding of the present situation in fundamental physics provides a quite different basis for ideas than the formulation of alternative courses of action (experiments) or alternative forms of knowledge (theories), which proceeds from the belief in a full separation of theory from experiment in this field. It is (...)
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  18. Sonja Smets (2005). The Modes of Physical Properties in the Logical Foundations of Physics. Logic and Logical Philosophy 14 (1):37-53.score: 46.0
    We present a conceptual analysis of the notions of actual physical property and potential physical property as used by theoretical physicists/mathematicians working in the domain of operational quantum logic. We investigate how these notions are being used today and what role they play in the specified field of research. In order to do so, we will give a brief introduction to this area of research and explain it as a part of the discipline known as “mathematical metascience”. An in depth (...)
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  19. Robert DiSalle (2006). Understanding Space-Time: The Philosophical Development of Physics From Newton to Einstein. Cambridge University Press.score: 42.0
    Presenting the history of space-time physics, from Newton to Einstein, as a philosophical development DiSalle reflects our increasing understanding of the connections between ideas of space and time and our physical knowledge. He suggests that philosophy's greatest impact on physics has come about, less by the influence of philosophical hypotheses, than by the philosophical analysis of concepts of space, time, and motion and the roles they play in our assumptions about physical objects and physical measurements. This way (...)
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  20. Katherine Brading & Elena Castellani, Symmetries and Invariances in Classical Physics.score: 42.0
    Symmetry, intended as invariance with respect to a transformation (more precisely, with respect to a transformation group), has acquired more and more importance in modern physics. This Chapter explores in 8 Sections the meaning, application and interpretation of symmetry in classical physics. This is done both in general, and with attention to specific topics. The general topics include illustration of the distinctions between symmetries of objects and of laws, and between symmetry principles and symmetry arguments (such as Curie's (...)
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  21. D. Dieks (2001). Space and Time in Particle and Field Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 32 (2):217-241.score: 42.0
    Textbooks present classical particle and field physics as theories of physical systems situated in Newtonian absolute space. This absolute space has an influence on the evolution of physical processes, and can therefore be seen as a physical system itself; it is substantival. It turns out to be possible, however, to interpret the classical theories in another way. According to this rival interpretation, spatiotemporal position is a property of physical systems, and there is no substantival spacetime. The traditional objection (...)
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  22. Peter Mittelstaedt (2010). On the Meaning of the Constant "C" in Modern Physics. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 41 (1):45 - 53.score: 42.0
    In modern physics, the constant "c" plays a twofold role. On the one hand, "c" is the well known velocity of light in an empty Minkowskian space—time, on the other hand "c" is a characteristic number of Special Relativity that governs the Lorentz transformation and its consequences for the measurements of space—time intervals. We ask for the interrelations between these two, at first sight different meanings of "c". The conjecture that the value of "c" has any influence on (...)
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  23. Huw Price (1997). Time's Arrow and Archimedes' Point: New Directions for the Physics of Time. OUP USA.score: 42.0
    `splendidly provocative ... enjoy it as a feast for the imagination.' John Gribbin, Sunday Times -/- Why is the future so different from the past? Why does the past affect the future and not the other way round? The universe began with the Big Bang - will it end with a 'Big Crunch'? This exciting book presents an innovative and controversial view of time and contemporary physics. Price urges physicists, philosophers, and anyone who has ever pondered the paradoxes of (...)
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  24. Gerald Holton (2006). Philipp Frank at Harvard University: His Work and His Influence. Synthese 153 (2):297 - 311.score: 42.0
    The physicist–philosopher Philipp Frank’s work and influence, especially during his last three decades, when he found a refuge and a position in America, deserve more discussion than has been the case so far. In what follows, I hope I may call him Philipp – having been first a graduate student in one of his courses at Harvard University, then his teaching assistant sharing his offices, then for many years his colleague and friend in the same Physics Department, and (...)
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  25. Jürgen Sarnowsky (1999). Place and Space in Albert of Saxony's Commentaries on the Physics. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 9 (01):25-.score: 42.0
    Albert of Saxony, master of Arts at Paris from 1351 until 1361/62, has left two commentaries on the Physics of Aristotle. Since he was well aware of the tradition, his writings may serve for an analysis of the transmision of ideas from the ancient and Arabic philosophers into the fourteenth century. In this paper, this is exemplified by the problems of place and space, especially by those of the definition of place and of the immobility of place, of natural (...)
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  26. Anne Focke, Christian Stockinger, Christina Diepold, Marco Taubert & Thorsten Stein (2013). The Influence of Catch Trials on the Consolidation of Motor Memory in Force Field Adaptation Tasks. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 42.0
    In computational neuroscience it is generally accepted that human motor memory contains neural representations of the physics of the musculoskeletal system and the objects in the environment. These representations are called “internal models”. Force field studies, in which subjects have to adapt to dynamic perturbations induced by a robotic manipulandum, are an established tool to analyze the characteristics of such internal models. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether catch trials during force field learning could (...) the consolidation of motor memory in more complex tasks. Thereby, the force field was more than double the force field of previous studies (35 Ns/m). Moreover, the arm of the subjects was not supported. A total of forty-six subjects participated in this study and performed center-out movements at a robotic manipulandum in two different force fields. Two control groups learned force field A on day 1 and were retested in the same force field on day 3 (AA). Two test groups additionally learned an interfering force field B (=-A) on day 2 (ABA). The difference between the two test and control groups, respectively, was the absence (0%) or presence (19%) of catch trials, in which the force field was turned off suddenly. The results showed consolidation of force field A on day 3 for both control groups. Test groups showed no consolidation of force field A (19% catch trials) and even poorer performance on day 3 (0% catch trials). In conclusion, it can be stated that catch trials seem to have a positive effect on the performance on day 3 but do not trigger a consolidation process as shown in previous studies that used a lower force field viscosity with supported arm. These findings indicate that the results of previous studies in which less complex tasks were analyzed, cannot be fully transferred to more complex tasks. Moreover, the effects of catch trials in these situations are insufficiently understood and further research is needed. (shrink)
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  27. Lindsay Judson (ed.) (1995). Aristotle's Physics: A Collection of Essays. Clarendon Press.score: 42.0
    The Physics is one of Aristotle's masterpieces - a work of extraordinary intellectual power which has had a profound influence on the development of metaphysics and the philosophy of science, as well as on the development of physics itself. This collection of ten new essays by leading Aristotelian scholars examines a wide range of issues in the Physics and related works, including method, causation and explanation, chance, teleology, the infinite, the nature of time, the critique of (...)
     
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  28. Diederik Aerts (2009). Quantum Particles as Conceptual Entities: A Possible Explanatory Framework for Quantum Theory. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 14 (4):361-411.score: 36.0
    We put forward a possible new interpretation and explanatory framework for quantum theory. The basic hypothesis underlying this new framework is that quantum particles are conceptual entities. More concretely, we propose that quantum particles interact with ordinary matter, nuclei, atoms, molecules, macroscopic material entities, measuring apparatuses, in a similar way to how human concepts interact with memory structures, human minds or artificial memories. We analyze the most characteristic aspects of quantum theory, i.e. entanglement and non-locality, interference and superposition, identity and (...)
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  29. Tuomas K. Pernu (2011). Minding Matter: How Not to Argue for the Causal Efficacy of the Mental. Rev Neuroscience 22 (5):483-507.score: 36.0
    The most fundamental issue of the neurosciences is the question of how or whether the mind and the body can interact with each other. It has recently been suggested in several studies that current neuroimaging evidence supports a view where the mind can have a well-documented causal influence on various brain processes. These arguments are critically analyzed here. First, the metaphysical commitments of the current neurosciences are reviewed. According to both the philosophical and neuroscientific received views, mental states are (...)
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  30. J. R. Lucas (1990). Spacetime and Electromagnetism: An Essay on the Philosophy of the Special Theory of Relativity. Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
    That space and time should be integrated into a single entity, spacetime, is the great insight of Einstein's special theory of relativity, and leads us to regard spacetime as a fundamental context in which to make sense of the world around us. But it is not the only one. Causality is equally important and at least as far as the special theory goes, it cannot be subsumed under a fundamentally geometrical form of explanation. In fact, the agent of propagation of (...)
     
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  31. Daniel P. Sheehan (ed.) (2006). Frontiers of Time: Retrocausation--Experiment and Theory: San Diego, California, 20-22 June 2006. American Institute of Physics.score: 36.0
    Traditional causation posits that the past alone influences the present. In principle, however, the basic laws of physics permit the future an equal measure of influence: retrocausation. This symposium explores theoretical developments and experimental evidence for retrocausation. It is unique in stressing recent experiments in this exciting and potentially important new field.
     
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  32. John A. Bargh, Lawrence E. Williams, Julie Y. Huang, Hyunjin Song & Joshua M. Ackerman (2010). From the Physical to the Psychological: Mundane Experiences Influence Social Judgment and Interpersonal Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):267-268.score: 32.0
    Mere physical experiences of warmth, distance, hardness, and roughness are found to activate the more abstract psychological concepts that are analogically related to them, such as interpersonal warmth and emotional distance, thereby influencing social judgments and interpersonal behavior without the individual's awareness. These findings further support the principle of neural reuse in the development and operation of higher mental processes.
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  33. C. W. Rietdijk & F. Selleri (1985). Proof of a Quantum Mechanical Nonlocal Influence. Foundations of Physics 15 (3):303-317.score: 30.0
    First it is proved that, in a deterministic theory, Malus' law requires that, if a photon is successively transmitted by two polarizers with appropriately chosen settings, the first transmission influences a hidden variable (co-) determining the second one. We derive from this that in an ideal EPR experiment (giving the result predicted by quantum mechanics for two correlated photons transmitted by two polarizers with suitably chosen settings) there has to be a nonlocal influence from the “first” transmission interaction to (...)
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  34. R. F. O'Connell (1983). The Wigner Distribution Function—50th Birthday. Foundations of Physics 13 (1):83-92.score: 30.0
    We discuss the profound influence which the Wigner distribution function has had in many areas of physics during its fifty years of existence.
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  35. C. W. Rietdijk (1981). Another Proof That the Future Can Influence the Present. Foundations of Physics 11 (9-10):783-790.score: 30.0
    A modified Young double-slit experiment proposed by Wootters and Zurek is considered in which a system P of parallel plates covered with a photographic emulsion has been set up in the region where we would normally expect the central interference fringes. Because under certain conditions P makes it possible to conclude with much more than50% certainty through which of the two slits each particular photon passed, the relevant interference pattern becomes blurred. It is proved that this implies a retroactive effect (...)
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  36. C. Lloyd Morgan (1936). Physical Influence and Mental Reference. Philosophy 11 (42):176 - 185.score: 30.0
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  37. Jeffrey M. Schwartz, Henry P. Stapp & Mario Beauregard (2004). The Volitional Influence of the Mind on the Brain, with Special Reference to Emotional Self-Regulation. In Mario Beauregard (ed.), Consciousness, Emotional Self-Regulation and the Brain. John Benjamins. 195-238.score: 30.0
  38. Georges Lochak (1982). The Evolution of the Ideas of Louis de Broglie on the Interpretation of Wave Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 12 (10):931-953.score: 30.0
    This paper is devoted to an analysis of the intellectual itinerary of Louis de Broglie, from the discovery of wave mechanics, until today. Essential attention is paid to the fact that this itinerary is far from being linear, since after a first attempt to develop his own views on wave mechanics through the theory of singular waves, Louis de Broglie abandoned it for twenty five years, under the influence of the Copenhagen School (even embracing the conceptions of the latter), (...)
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  39. Ana Fernández del Río, Elka Korutcheva & Javier de la Rubia (2012). Interdependent Binary Choices Under Social Influence: Phase Diagram for Homogeneous Unbiased Populations. Complexity 17 (6):31-41.score: 30.0
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  40. Peter Rastall (1985). Locality, Bell's Theorem, and Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 15 (9):963-972.score: 30.0
    Classical relativistic physics assumes that spatially separated events cannot influence one another (“locality”) and that values may be assigned to quantities independently of whether or not they are actually measured (“realism”). These assumptions have consequences—the Bell inequalities—that are sometimes in disagreement with experiment and with the predictions of quantum mechanics. It has been argued that, even if realism is not assumed, the violation of the Bell inequalities implies nonlocality—and hence that radical changes are necessary in the foundations of (...)
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  41. S. [from old catalog] Linde (1966). Einstein's Special Theory and the Influence of Relative Velocity on Time. [Fort Hare, South Africa]Fort Hare University Press.score: 30.0
     
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  42. Henry P. Stapp (2014). Mind, Brain, and Neuroscience. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 10 (1):227-231.score: 28.0
    Quantum mechanics as conceived by Niels Bohr and formulated in rigorous terms by John von Neumann is expressed as quantum neuroscience: a description of the relationship between certain conscious experiences of an observer that are described in terms of the concepts of classical physics and neural processes that are described in terms of the concepts of quantum physics. The theory is applied to recent neuroscience data to determine the rapidity of the observer's probing actions that is needed to (...)
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  43. James T. Cushing (1990/2005). Theory Construction and Selection in Modern Physics: The S Matrix. Cambridge University Press.score: 28.0
    One of the major philosophical problems in physical sciences is what criteria should determine how scientific theories are selected and justified in practice and whether, in describing observable physical phenomena, such theories are effectively constrained to be unique. This book studies the example of a particular theory, the S-matrix theory. The S-matrix program was initiated by Heisenberg to deal with difficulties encountered in quantum field theories in describing particular phenomena. Since then, each theory has at different times been favored as (...)
     
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  44. Samuel W. Fernberger (1916). The Influence of Mental and Physical Work on the Formation of Judgments in Lifted Weight Experiments. Journal of Experimental Psychology 1 (6):508.score: 28.0
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  45. Christiane Bailey (2011). The Genesis of Existentials in Animal Life: Heidegger's Appropriation of Aristotle's Ontology of Life. Heidegger Circle Proceedings 1 (1):199-212.score: 24.0
    Paper presented at the Heidegger Circle 2011. Although Aristotle’s influence on young Heidegger’s thought has been studied at length, such studies have almost exclusively focused on his interpretation of Aristotle’s ethics, physics and metaphysics. I will rather address Heidegger’s appropriation of Aristotle’s ontology of life. Focusing on recently published or recently translated courses of the mid 20’s (mainly SS 1924, WS 1925-26 and SS 1926), I hope to uncover an important aspect of young Heidegger’s thought left unconsidered: namely, (...)
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  46. Karl H. Pribram (2009). Minding Quanta and Cosmology. Zygon 44 (2):451-466.score: 24.0
    The revolution in science inaugurated by quantum physics has made us aware of the role of observation in the construction of data. Eugene Wigner remarked that in quantum physics we no longer have observables (invariants), only observations. Tongue in cheek, I asked him whether that meant that quantum physics is really psychology, expecting a gruff reply to my sassiness. Instead, Wigner beamed understanding and replied "Yes, yes, that's exactly correct." David Bohm pointed out that were we to (...)
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  47. Stathos Psillos, Defending Deductive Nomology.score: 24.0
    In recent years philosophy of science has seen a resurgence of interest in metaphysical issues, especially those concerning laws, causation,and explanation. Although this book takes only the latter two words for its title, it is also about laws of nature. It is divided into three sections: the first is on causation, the second is on laws, and the third is on explanation: this is entirely appropriate because the debates about them are closely related. Ever since Hume argued that causation is (...)
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  48. Alexander A. Fingelkurts & Andrew A. Fingelkurts (2009). Is Our Brain Hardwired to Produce God, or is Our Brain Hardwired to Perceive God? A Systematic Review on the Role of the Brain in Mediating Religious Experience. Cognitive Processing 10 (4):293-326.score: 24.0
    To figure out whether the main empirical question “Is our brain hardwired to believe in and produce God, or is our brain hardwired to perceive and experience God?” is answered, this paper presents systematic critical review of the positions, arguments and controversies of each side of the neuroscientific-theological debate and puts forward an integral view where the human is seen as a psycho-somatic entity consisting of the multiple levels and dimensions of human existence (physical, biological, psychological, and spiritual reality), allowing (...)
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  49. Yuri Balashov (1994). Uniformitarianism in Cosmology: Background and Philosophical Implications of the Steady-State Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (6):933-958.score: 24.0
    Philosophical considerations have been essentially involved in the origin and development of the steady-state cosmological theory (SST). These considerations include an explicit uniformitarian methodology and implicit metaphysical views concerning the status of natural laws in a changing universe. I shall examine the foundations of SST by reconstructing its early history. Whereas the strong uniformitarian methodology of SST found no support in the subsequent development of cosmology, the idea of a possible influence the global structure of the universe may have (...)
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  50. Catherine Wilson (2008). Epicureanism at the Origins of Modernity. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This landmark study examines the role played by the rediscovery of the writings of the ancient atomists, Epicurus and Lucretius, in the articulation of the major philosophical systems of the seventeenth century, and, more broadly, their influence on the evolution of natural science and moral and political philosophy. The target of sustained and trenchant philosophical criticism by Cicero, and of opprobrium by the Christian Fathers of the early Church, for its unflinching commitment to the absence of divine supervision and (...)
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