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  1. added 2019-02-12
    Hume on Sustance: A Critique of Locke.Donald L. M. Baxter - 2015 - In Paul Lodge & Tom Stoneham (eds.), Locke and Leibniz on Substance. New York, NY, USA: pp. 45-62.
    The ancient theory of substance and accident is supposed to make sense of complex unities in a way that respects both their unity and their complexity. On Hume’s view such complex unities are only fictitiously unities. This result follows from his thoroughgoing critique of the theory of substance. I will characterize the theory Hume is critiquing as it is presented in Locke, presupposing what Bennett calls the “Leibnizian interpretation.” Locke uses the word ‘substance’ in two senses. Call substance in the (...)
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  2. added 2018-11-17
    Sobre la existencia de las percepciones en el pensamiento de Hume.Mario Edmundo Chávez Tortolero - 2018 - In Grobet Benítez & Luis Ramos-Alarcon (eds.), El concepto de substancia de Spinoza a Hegel. Ciudad de México, CDMX, México: pp. 267-288.
    In this paper I try to understand David Hume’s theory of the ideas as an alternative ontology. I assume that David Hume seeks to establish a criterion of human knowledge and moral behavior by thinking the fundamental concepts from philosophical tradition, such as substance and personal identity or subjectivity, and turning between the denial and the affirmation of them. In this sense, the criticism of the metaphysical tradition, to which some interpreters reduce his theory, and the alternative ontology which we (...)
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  3. added 2017-09-14
    What Was Hume's Problem with Personal Identity?Abraham Sesshu Roth - 2000 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 61 (1):91-114.
    An appreciation of Hume's psychology of object identity allows us to recognize certain tensions in his discussion of the origin of our belief in personal identity-tensions which have gone largely unnoticed in the secondary literature. This will serve to provide a new solution to the problem of explaining why Hume finds that discussion of personal identity so problematic when he famously disavows it in the Appendix to the Treatise. It turns out that the two psychological mechanisms which respectively generate the (...)
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  4. added 2017-02-24
    Hume's Scepticism and Realism - His Two Profound Arguments Against the Senses in An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding.Jani Hakkarainen - 2007 - Tampere, Finland: University of Tampere.
    The main problem of this study is David Hume’s (1711-76) view on Metaphysical Realism (there are mind-independent, external, and continuous entities). This specific problem is part of two more general questions in Hume scholarship: his attitude to scepticism and the relation between naturalism and skepticism in his thinking. A novel interpretation of these problems is defended in this work. The chief thesis is that Hume is both a sceptic and a Metaphysical Realist. His philosophical attitude is to suspend his judgment (...)
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  5. added 2016-08-29
    A Puzzle About Hume's Theory of General Representation.David Landy - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (2):257-282.
    according to hume’s theory of general representation, we represent generalities by associating certain ideas with certain words. On one prominent understanding of this theory, calling things by one name or another does not represent any real qualities of those things or any real relations between them. This interpretation runs into difficulty when we turn our attention to Hume’s own use of such general terms throughout the Treatise. It would seem that Hume’s own distinctions—such as the impression-idea distinction and simple-complex distinction—require (...)
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  6. added 2015-10-01
    The Ancients, the Vulgar, and Hume's Skepticism.Maria Magoula Adamos - 2014 - In P. Hanna (ed.), Anthology of Philosophical Studies. ATINER. pp. 5-15.
    Section III of part IV of Book I of Hume's Treatise entitled “Of the ancient philosophy” has been virtually ignored by most Hume scholars. Although philosophers seem to concentrate on sections II and VI of part IV and pay little or no attention to section III, the latter section is paramount in showing how serious Hume's skepticism is, and how Hume's philosophy, contrary to his intention, is far removed from "the sentiments of the vulgar". In this paper I shall first (...)
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  7. added 2015-04-25
    Locke, Berkeley and Hume on the Reality of Substance.Akhtar Imam - 1958 - Pakistan Philosophical Journal 1 (4):79.
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  8. added 2015-01-21
    Hume on the Cartesian Theory of Substance.Daniel E. Flage & Ronald J. Glass - 1984 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 22 (4):497-508.
    While most of hume's criticisms of the doctrine of substance are epistemological and theory-Independent, We show that in "treatise" i.Iv.5, Hume develops a metaphysical criticism of the cartesian theory of substance. Using three of pierre bayle's arguments of his own ends, He argues that on an empiricist theory of meaning, The cartesian theory of substance is reduced to absurdity.
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  9. added 2015-01-19
    Ockham, Descartes, and Hume. Self-Knowledge, Substance, and Causality. By Julius R. Weinberg. Madison: The University of Wisconsin Press, 1977. 179 + X Pages. $15.00. [REVIEW]Jerome V. Brown - 1979 - Dialogue 18 (1):118-122.
  10. added 2015-01-19
    Ockham, Descartes, and Hume. [REVIEW]Donald A. Cress - 1978 - International Studies in Philosophy 10:229-229.
  11. added 2015-01-19
    Ockham, Descartes, & Hume. Self-Knowledge, Substance, and Causality.J. D. North & Julius R. Weinberg - 1977 - Philosophical Quarterly 29 (117):358.
  12. added 2015-01-19
    Ockham, Descartes, and Hume: Self-Knowledge, Substance, and Causality.Julius R. Weinberg - 1977 - University of Wisconsin Press.
  13. added 2015-01-11
    Hume, the Occult, and the Substance of the School.David S. Oderberg - 2012 - Metaphysica 13 (2):155-174.
    I have not been able to locate any critique of Hume on substance by a Schoolman, at least in English, dating from Hume's period or shortly thereafter. I have, therefore, constructed my own critique as an exercise in ‘post facto history’. This is what a late eighteenth-century/early nineteenth-century Scholastic could, would, and should have said in response to Hume's attack on substance should they have been minded to do so. That no one did is somewhat mysterious. My critique is precisely (...)
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  14. added 2015-01-11
    Identity and Substance in Hume and Kant.Jay F. Rosenberg - 2000 - Topoi 19 (2):137-145.
    According to Hume, the idea of a persisting, self-identical object, distinct from our impressions of it, and the idea of a duration of time, the mere passage of time without change, are mutually supporting "fictions". Each rests upon a "mistake", the commingling of "qualities of the imagination" or "impressions of reflection" with "external" impressions (perceptions), and, strictly speaking, we are conceptually and epistemically entitled to neither. Among Kant's aims in the First Critique is the securing of precisely these entitlements. Like (...)
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  15. added 2015-01-11
    Hume on Modes.M. Glouberman - 1977 - Hume Studies 3 (1):32-50.
  16. added 2015-01-11
    The Attack on Substance: Descartes to Hume.Edwin B. Allaire - 1964 - Dialogue 3 (3):284-287.
  17. added 2014-03-18
    Imagined Causes: Hume’s Conception of Objects.Stefanie Rocknak - 2012 - Springer.
    This book provides the first comprehensive account of Hume’s conception of objects in Book I of the Treatise. What, according to Hume, are objects? Ideas? Impressions? Mind-independent objects? All three? None of the above? Through a close textual analysis, I show that Hume thought that objects are imagined ideas. However, I argue that he struggled with two accounts of how and when we imagine such ideas. On the one hand, Hume believed that we always and universally imagine that objects are (...)
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  18. added 2014-03-18
    The Vulgar Conception of Objects in 'Of Skepticism with Regard to the Senses.Stefanie Rocknak - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (1):67-90.
    In this paper, we see that contrary to most readings of T 1.4.2 in the Treatise (“Of Skepticism with Regard to the Senses”), Hume does not think that objects are sense impressions. This means that Hume’s position on objects (whatever that may be) is not to be conflated with the vulgar perspective. Moreover, the vulgar perspective undergoes a marked transition in T 1.4.2, evolving from what we may call vulgar perspective I into vulgar perspective II. This paper presents the first (...)
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