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  1. Why Skepticism Fails.Steven M. Duncan - manuscript
    Do skeptical arguments undermine reason, as Hume supposes? In this paper, I argue that they do not and that skepticism is thus no threat to dogmatism about the possibility of knowledge.
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  2. Darwin Versus Kant and Hume.Justin Le Saux - manuscript
    I claim evolution through natural selection is inconsistent with Kantian epistemology, because there is nothing about humans or 'the mind' which does not vary, so its inappropriate to base universal laws of nature on how the variable mind might generates experience. I also claim that the apparent self sufficient world presented by natural selection is at least suspiciously inconsistent with Hume's views that it is impossible to see how anything could itself (be sufficient to) produce anything.
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  3. Le Naturalisme, Avec Ou Sans le Scepticisme ? Après Hume.Jocelyn Benoist - forthcoming - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale.
    S'attachant au Traité de la nature humaine de Hume, l'auteur essaie de montrer comment le concept moderne de naturalisme est un concept ambigu. D'un côté, Hume a ouvert la possibilité d'une science de la nature humaine, qui traite le sujet connaissant comme lui-même objet possible de connaissance. De l'autre côté, prenant en compte cette constitution du sujet connaissant comme pur fait et la réincorporant dans le flux de la vie (comme réalité et comme expérience), il a mis cette science aux (...)
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  4. Comment Peut-on Être Sceptique? David Hume Ou la Cohérence du Scepticisme Moderne.Céline Denat & Claire Etchegaray - forthcoming - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale.
    La philosophie moderne tente souvent de faire du scepticisme un simple instrument ou moment provisoire de la recherche d'une certitude. Au travers surtout de l'étude du Traité de la nature humaine, on montrera ici qu'à l'inverse le scepticisme de Hume est un scepticisme consistant, puisqu'il ne contredit pas le « naturalisme » et n'est pas non plus un simple moyen qui lui serait subordonné. Étant en relation avec lui non seulement de l'extérieur mais par essence, le scepticisme mitigé se maintient (...)
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  5. The Humors in Hume's Skepticism.Charles Goldhaber - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    In the conclusion to the first book of the Treatise, Hume's skeptical reflections have plunged him into melancholy. He then proceeds through a complex series of stages, resulting in renewed interest in philosophy. Interpreters have struggled to explain the connection between the stages. I argue that Hume's repeated invocation of the four humors of ancient and medieval medicine explains the succession, and sheds a new light on the significance of skepticism. The humoral context not only reveals that Hume conceives of (...)
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  6. How Kant Thought He Could Reach Hume.Charles Goldhaber - forthcoming - In Camilla Serck-Hanssen & Beatrix Himmelmann (eds.), Proceedings of the 13th International Kant Congress: The Court of Reason (Oslo, 6–9 August 2019). De Gruyter.
    I argue that Kant thought his Transcendental Deduction of the Pure Concepts could reach skeptical empiricists like Hume by providing an overlooked explanation of the mind's a priori relation to the objects of experience. And he thought empiricists may be motivated to listen to this explanation because of an instability and dissatisfaction inherent to empiricism.
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  7. Hume entre o academicismo eo pirronismo.Lívia Guimarâes - forthcoming - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy.
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  8. Hume's Argument That Empirical Knowledge Cannot Be Certain, From the Enquires.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - forthcoming - .
    This argument map reconstructs David Hume's famous skeptical argument in logical form. The argument is open for debate and comments in AGORA-net . Search for map ID 9857.
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  9. Synthetic a Priori Judgments and Kant’s Response to Hume on Induction.Hsueh Qu - forthcoming - Synthese:1-27.
    This paper will make the case that we can find in Kant’s Second Analogy a substantive response to Hume’s argument on induction. This response is substantive insofar as it does not merely consist in independently arguing for the opposite conclusion, but rather, it identifies and exploits a gap in this argument. More specifically, Hume misses the possibility of justifying the uniformity of nature as a synthetic a priori proposition, which Kant looks to establish in the Second Analogy. Note that the (...)
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  10. Response to My Critics (The Sydney Sessions).Stefanie Rocknak - forthcoming - Hume Studies.
    Response to Don Baxter, Don Garrett and Jennifer Marusic regarding my book Imagined Causes: Hume's Conception of Objects; initially delivered at the 2016 Hume Conference in Sydney, Australia as part of the Author Meets Critics session.
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  11. Revisionism Gone Awry: Since When Hasn't Hume Been a Sceptic?Adam Andreotta & Michael Levine - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (2):133-155.
    In this paper, we argue that revisionary theories about the nature and extent of Hume's scepticism are mistaken. We claim that the source of Hume's pervasive scepticism is his empiricism. As earlier readings of Hume's Treatise claim, Hume was a sceptic – and a radical one. Our position faces one enormous problem. How is it possible to square Hume's claims about normative reasoning with his radical scepticism? Despite the fact that Hume thinks that causal reasoning is irrational, he explicitly claims (...)
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  12. Hume's Skeptical Definitions of "Cause".David Storrs-Fox - 2020 - Hume Studies 43 (1):3-28.
    The relation between Hume’s constructive and skeptical aims has been a central concern for Hume interpreters. Hume’s two definitions of ‘cause’ in the Treatise and first Enquiry apparently represent an important constructive achievement, but this paper argues that the definitions must be understood in terms of Hume’s skepticism. The puzzle I address is simply that Hume gives two definitions rather than one. I use Don Garrett’s interpretation as a foil to develop my alternative skeptical interpretation. Garrett claims the definitions exhibit (...)
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  13. Bredo Johnsen. Righting Epistemology: Hume’s Revolution. [REVIEW]Matt Carlson - 2019 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 7 (5):32-38.
  14. Quasi-Realism and Inductive Scepticism in Hume’s Theory of Causation.Dominic K. Dimech - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 97 (4):637-650.
    Interpreters of Hume on causation consider that an advantage of the ‘quasi-realist’ reading is that it does not commit him to scepticism or to an error theory about causal reasoning. It is unique to quasi-realism that it maintains this positive epistemic result together with a rejection of metaphysical realism about causation: the quasi-realist supplies an appropriate semantic theory in order to justify the practice of talking ‘as if’ there were causal powers in the world. In this paper, I problematise the (...)
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  15. How to Solve Hume's Problem of Induction.Alexander Jackson - 2019 - Episteme 16 (2):157-174.
    This paper explains what’s wrong with a Hume-inspired argument for skepticism about induction. Hume’s argument takes as a premise that inductive reasoning presupposes that the future will resemble the past. I explain why that claim is not plausible. The most plausible premise in the vicinity is that inductive reasoning from E to H presupposes that if E then H. I formulate and then refute a skeptical argument based on that premise. Central to my response is a psychological explanation for how (...)
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  16. Popper and Hume: Two Great Skeptics.Zuzana Parusniková - 2019 - In Raphael Sassower & Nathaniel Laor (eds.), The Impact of Critical Rationalism: Expanding the Popperian Legacy Through the Works of Ian C. Jarvie. Springer Verlag. pp. 207-223.
    Karl Popper explicitly discusses two problems in David Hume’s epistemology. He praises Hume for his critique of induction, specifically for his claim that inductive inferences are logically invalid. He rejects Hume’s psychological account of induction, specifically his theory of belief formation by repetition. Thus, Popper famously concludes that Hume buried the logical gems in the psychological mud and endorsed an irrationalist epistemology. The logical problem of induction gives Popper the impetus for spelling out his new, negative concept of reason, one (...)
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  17. Strategies for Teaching Kant’s Metaphysics and Hume’s Skepticism in Survey Courses.C. D. Brewer - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (1):1-19.
    Teaching Kant’s metaphysics to undergraduates in a survey course can be quite challenging. Specifically, it can be daunting to motivate interest in Kant’s project and present his system in an accessible way in a short amount of time. Furthermore, comprehending some of the important features of his requires some understanding of Hume’s skepticism. Unfortunately, students often misunderstand the extent and relevance of Hume’s skepticism. Here, I offer three strategies for presenting Kant’s metaphysics as a response to Hume. First, I describe (...)
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  18. Hjumovo shvatanje odnosa između skepticizma i filozofije.Aleksandra Davidović - 2018 - Theoria: Beograd 61 (3):93-118.
    U ovom radu istražujem kako su se Hjumova gledišta o odnosu između skepticizma i filozofije razvijala i kako su sazrevala tokom njegovog filozofskog rada. Hjumovo prvo delo, Rasprava o ljudskoj prirodi, ostavlja otvoreno pitanje zašto bi se iko bavio filozofijom u svetlu otkrića da su skeptički argumenti neoborivi. Cilj mi je da pokažem da, iako se Hjumov stav o skepticizmu i njegova skeptička pozicija nisu suštinski menjali tokom godina, Istraživanje o ljudskom razumu i Dijalozi o prirodnoj religiji, kao i nekoliko (...)
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  19. Hume on External Existence: A Sceptical Predicament.Dominic K. Dimech - 2018 - Dissertation, University of Sydney
    This thesis investigates Hume’s philosophy of external existence in relation to, and within the context of, his philosophy of scepticism. In his two main works on metaphysics – A Treatise of Human Nature (1739–40) and the first Enquiry (first ed. 1748) – Hume encounters a predicament pertaining to the unreflective, ‘vulgar’ attribution of external existence to mental perceptions and the ‘philosophical’ distinction between perceptions and objects. I argue that we should understand this predicament as follows: the vulgar opinion is our (...)
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  20. Hume's Internalist Epistemology in EHU 12.Hsueh Qu - 2018 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 96 (3):517-539.
    Much has been written about Kemp Smith's famous problem regarding the tension between Hume's naturalism and his scepticism. However, most commentators have focused their attention on the Treatise; those who address the Enquiry often take it to express essentially the same message as the Treatise. When Hume's scepticism in the Enquiry has been investigated in its own right, commentators have tended to focus on Hume's inductive scepticism in Sections 4 and 5. All in all, it seems that Section 12 has (...)
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  21. Review of "Righting Epistemology: Hume's Revolution". [REVIEW]Jared Bates - 2017 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2017.
    Review of Bredo Johnsen's "Righting Epistemology: Hume's Revolution" (OUP, 2017).
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  22. Ideas, Evidence, and Method: Hume's Skepticism and Naturalism Concerning Knowledge and Causation. [REVIEW]Jonathan Cottrell - 2017 - Philosophical Review 126 (3):393-398.
  23. Hume's Skepticism and the Whimsical Condition.Michael Losonsky - 2017 - Hume Studies 43 (1):29-59.
    At a crucial point in the final section 12 of Hume's Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding he refers to "the whimsical condition of mankind".1 This occurs in his concluding remarks about the untenability of what he calls "Pyrrhonism, or excessive scepticism" that set the stage for "mitigated scepticism, or ACADEMICAL philosophy", which then culminates in the famous agitated final paragraph of the first Enquiry that advocates "havoc" and committing certain kinds of books "to the flames".I wish to examine the content, context, (...)
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  24. Hume's Scepticism Regarding Reason.John Asquith - 2016 - Dissertation, Oxford Brookes University
    There is a tradition perhaps as old as philosophy itself which sees the rationality of man – and in particular, the rationality of the philosopher - as both his essential and his redeeming characteristic; it can not unfairly be said that the discipline of philosophy at least is characterised by its dependence on reason. In this context, the philosophy of David Hume presents something of a stark challenge: Although interpretations vary as to the extent and nature of his scepticism, one (...)
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  25. Excuses for Hume's Skepticism.Yuval Avnur - 2016 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 92 (2):264-306.
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  26. Realismo ontológico e antirrealismo epistemológico na problema do mundo externo em Hume.Leandro Hollanda - 2016 - In Jaimir Conte, Marília Cortês de Ferraz & Flávio Zimmermann (eds.), Ensaios sobre a filosofia de Hume. Florianópolis: Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC). pp. 403-432.
    No Tratado da natureza humana, David Hume dedica uma longa seção à problemática sobre a possibilidade da existência do mundo externo intitulada “Do ceticismo quanto aos sentidos”. A seção traz idas e vindas do autor no que diz respeito à resposta para o problema. Inicialmente, Hume dá como certa a existência externa dos corpos, i.e., independente das percepções, e avisa que sua investigação se limitará, apenas, às causas que levam a crer nisso. Sua pretensão inicial não é cumprida e logo (...)
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  27. The Title Principle (Or Lack Thereof) in the Enquiry.Hsueh Qu - 2016 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 33 (3):257-274.
    The Title Principle is seen by a number of commentators as crucial to Hume’s resolution of skeptical doubts in THN 1.4.7, thus providing an answer to Kemp Smith’s (1941) famous worry regarding the tension between Hume’s skepticism and his naturalism. However, I will argue that in the Enquiry, Hume rejects both the Title Principle and the role of the passions in his epistemology. Those who think that neither the Title Principle nor the passions play a significant role in THN 1.4.7 (...)
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  28. Hume's Philosophy of Irreligion and the Myth of British Empiricism.Paul Russell - 2016 - In The Oxford Handbook of HUME. New York, NY, USA: pp. 109-37.
    This chapter outlines an alternative interpretation of Hume’s philosophy, one that aims, among other things, to explain some of the most perplexing puzzles concerning the relationship between Hume’s skepticism and his naturalism. The key to solving these puzzles, it is argued, rests with recognizing Hume’s fundamental irreligious aims and objectives, beginning with his first and greatest work, A Treatise of Human Nature. The irreligious interpretation not only reconfigures our understanding of the unity and structure of Hume’s thought, it also provides (...)
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  29. Empirical Cognition in the Transcendental Deduction: Kant’s Starting Point and His Humean Problem.Curtis Sommerlatte - 2016 - Kantian Review 21 (3):437-463.
    In this paper, I argue that in the sense of greatest epistemological concern for Kant, empirical cognition is “rational sensory discrimination”: the identification or differentiation of sensory objects from each other, occurring through a capacity to become aware of and express judgments. With this account of empirical cognition, I show how the transcendental deduction of the first Critique is most plausibly read as having as its fundamental assumption the thesis that we have empirical cognition, and I provide evidence that Kant (...)
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  30. Hume's Skeptical Realism.John Wright - 2016 - In The Oxford Handbook of Hume. pp. 60-81.
    The author argues that the core of Hume’s Academic skepticism lies in his commitment to an external world and objective causal powers that are cognitively opaque to human understanding. Three central topics of Hume’s theory of the understanding are discussed —the existence of absolute space, the existence of a world external to our senses, and the existence of objective causal powers. In each case, Hume draws a Pyrrhonian opposition between judgments based on his “Copy Principle” and the “fictions” or “illusions” (...)
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  31. Hume's True Scepticism.Donald C. Ainslie - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    David Hume is famous as a sceptical philosopher but the nature of his scepticism is difficult to pin down. Hume's True Scepticism provides the first sustained interpretation of Part 4 of Book 1 of Hume's Treatise: his deepest engagement with sceptical arguments, in which he notes that, while reason shows that we ought not to believe the verdicts of reason or the senses, we do so nonetheless. Donald C. Ainslie addresses Hume's theory of representation; his criticisms of Locke, Descartes, and (...)
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  32. Kevin Meeker's Hume's Radical Scepticism and the Fate of Naturalized Epistemology. [REVIEW]Angela Coventry - 2015 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
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  33. Frederick Schmitt, Hume's Epistemology in the Treatise: A Veritistic Interpretation. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. 448 Pp. £55.00 Hb. ISBN 9780199683116. [REVIEW]Stefanie Rocknak - 2015 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 13 (2):152-158.
    In this book, Schmitt claims that Hume, however implicitly, employs a fully-developed epistemology in the Treatise. In particular, Hume employs a “veritistic” epistemology, i.e. one that is grounded in truth, particularly, true beliefs. In some cases, these true beliefs are “certain,” are “infallible” (78) and are justified, as in the case of knowledge, i.e. demonstrations. In other cases, we acquire these beliefs through a reliable method, i.e. when they are produced by causal proofs. Such beliefs are also “certain” (69, 81) (...)
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  34. The Ancients, the Vulgar, and Hume's Skepticism.Maria Magoula Adamos - 2014 - In P. Hanna (ed.), Anthology of Philosophical Studies. ATINER. pp. 5-15.
    Section III of part IV of Book I of Hume's Treatise entitled “Of the ancient philosophy” has been virtually ignored by most Hume scholars. Although philosophers seem to concentrate on sections II and VI of part IV and pay little or no attention to section III, the latter section is paramount in showing how serious Hume's skepticism is, and how Hume's philosophy, contrary to his intention, is far removed from "the sentiments of the vulgar". In this paper I shall first (...)
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  35. Hume’s Practically Epistemic Conclusions?Hsueh Qu - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 170 (3):501-524.
    The inoffensive title of Section 1.4.7 of Hume’s Treatise of Human Nature, ‘Conclusion of this Book’, belies the convoluted treatment of scepticism contained within. It is notoriously difficult to decipher Hume’s considered response to scepticism in this section, or whether he even has one. In recent years, however, one line of interpretation has gained popularity in the literature. The ‘usefulness and agreeableness reading’ (henceforth U&A) interprets Hume as arguing in THN 1.4.7 that our beliefs and/or epistemic policies are justified via (...)
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  36. Curious Virtues in Hume's Epistemology.Karl Schafer - 2014 - Philosophers' Imprint 14:1-20.
  37. Retórica Anticética Nos Diálogos Sobre a Religião Natural de Hume/Anti-Sceptical Rhetoric in Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion.Lívia Guimarães - 2013 - Natureza Humana 15 (2).
    Neste ensaio, parto da pergunta acerca da motivação original dos Diálogos sobre a religião natural de Hume : de onde a propensão para o argumento pelo desígnio obtém força suficiente para prevalecer sobre a propensão natural a se acreditar nos sentidos e na experiência? Em minha hipótese, os Diálogos, não obstante seu título, representam uma falha na compreensão mútua. Enfocando o drama da peça, pretendo mostrar que, em Cleantes, eles expõem um viés prosélito no teísmo moderno; mais especificamente, que apontam (...)
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  38. Pragmatic Vs. Skeptical Empiricism: Hume and Dewey on Experience and Causation. Jordan - 2013 - The Pluralist 8 (1):31-62.
    All knowledge 'begins with experience,' but it does not therefore 'arise' from experience.The classical American pragmatists are usually considered to be either empiricists or heirs to the empiricist tradition in philosophy. This is unsurprising given the nature of the pragmatist philosophical program as a late nineteenth-and early twentieth-century reaction against transcendental idealism. Pragmatists sought to ground their inquiry resolutely in experience sans speculative metaphysics. However, the pragmatists were also stridently opposed to certain doctrines and epistemological tendencies in British empiricism that (...)
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  39. Scepticisme et morale.Éléonore Le Jallé - 2013 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 263 (1):29-46.
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  40. Hume's Skeptical Politics.Miriam Schleifer McCormick - 2013 - Hume Studies 39 (1):77-102.
    Most twentieth-century discussions of Hume’s politics echo the view expressed by T. H. Grose in his 1889 introduction to Hume’s works where he says that Hume’s philosophical labors came to an end when he started writing essays and history.1 In his foreword to the revised edition of Hume’s Essays, Eugene Miller voices his disagreement with this view, saying, “Hume’s essays do not mark an abandonment of philosophy . . . but rather an attempt to improve it by having it address (...)
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  41. Hume’s Skeptical Crisis. By Robert Fogelin. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. Pp. Xvii + 174. ISBN: 978-0-19-538-739-1. [REVIEW]A. Leland Morton - 2013 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 3 (3):229-231.
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  42. Constancy and Coherence in 1.4.2 of Hume’s Treatise: The Root of “Indirect” Causation and Hume’s Position on Objects.Stefanie Rocknak - 2013 - The European Legacy (4):444-456.
    This article shows that in 1.4.2.15-24 of the Treatise of Human Nature, Hume presents his own position on objects, which is to be distinguished from both the vulgar and philosophical conception of objects. Here, Hume argues that objects that are effectively imagined to have a “perfect identity” are imagined due to the constancy and coherence of our perceptions (what we may call ‘level 1 constancy and coherence’). In particular, we imagine that objects cause such perceptions, via what I call ‘indirect (...)
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  43. Paul Russell. The Riddle of Hume’s Treatise: Skepticism, Naturalism, and Irreligion. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008. Pp. 424. $99.00 ; $34.95. [REVIEW]Eric Schliesser - 2013 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (1):172-175.
  44. David Hume als therapeutischer Philosoph. Eine Auflösung der Induktionsproblematik mit wittgensteinianischer Methode.Friederike Schmitz - 2013 - Dissertation, Universität Heidelberg
    Ziel der Arbeit ist zu zeigen, dass sich in der theoretischen Philosophie David Humes Ansätze zu einer therapeutischen Methode finden, wie sie von Ludwig Wittgenstein angewandt und beschrieben wurde. Im ersten Teil wird Wittgensteins Konzeption der Philosophie und ihre Anwendung anhand einer genauen Textexegese dargestellt. Der zweite Teil untersucht primär die Humeschen Überlegungen zu Kausalität und Induktion, seine methodologischen Aussagen sowie seine Perzeptionstheorie und argumentiert für die These, dass Hume ebenfalls, wenn auch mit Einschränkungen, Elemente einer therapeutischen Methode und eine (...)
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  45. Hume on Scepticism and the Moral Sciences.Alan Bailey - 2012 - In Alan Bailey & Dan O'Brien (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Hume. Continuum. pp. 146.
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  46. Scepticism and the Development of the Transcendental Dialectic.Brian A. Chance - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (2):311-331.
    Kant's response to scepticism in the Critique of Pure Reason is complex and remarkably nuanced, although it is rarely recognized as such. In this paper, I argue that recent attempts to flesh out the details of this response by Paul Guyer and Michael Forster do not go far enough. Although they are right to draw a distinction between Humean and Pyrrhonian scepticism and locate Kant's response to the latter in the Transcendental Dialectic, their accounts fail to capture two important aspects (...)
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  47. Paul Russell, The Riddle of Hume's Treatise: Skepticism, Naturalism, and Irreligion (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008). [REVIEW]Lorenzo Greco - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (247):432-35.
  48. Hume's Scepticism and Realism.Jani Hakkarainen - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (2):283-309.
    In this article, a novel interpretation of one of the problems of Hume scholarship is defended: his view of Metaphysical Realism or the belief in an external world (that there are ontologically and causally perception-independent, absolutely external and continued, i.e. Real entities). According to this interpretation, Hume's attitude in the domain of philosophy should be distinguished from his view in the domain of everyday life: Hume the philosopher suspends his judgement on Realism, whereas Hume the common man firmly believes in (...)
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  49. The Sceptical Beast in the Beastly Sceptic: Human Nature in Hume.P. J. E. Kail - 2012 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 70:219-231.
    David Hume's most brilliant and ambitious work is entitled A Treatise of Human Nature, and it, together with his other writings, has left an indelible mark on philosophical conceptions of human nature. So it is not merely the title of Hume's work that makes discussion of it an appropriate inclusion to this volume, but the fact of its sheer influence. However, its pattern of influence – including, of course, the formulations of ideas consciously antithetical Hume's own – is an immensely (...)
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  50. Are Humean Beliefs Pyrrhonian Appearances? Hume's Critique of Pyrrhonism Revisited.Jan Palkoska - 2012 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 10 (2):183-198.
    The aim of the paper is to reassess Hume's handling of scepticism in its Pyrrhonian form. I argue that, contrary to what Hume declares, his own philosophy comes close to what Sextus Empiricus sets out as the essential moments of the Pyrrhonian , at least in one crucial respect: I contend that Hume's conception of belief is in line with precisely the type of doxastic state which Sextus ascribes to the Pyrrhonian sceptic as appropriate for ‘following appearances’. Then I show (...)
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