18 found
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  1. What makes a problem an ethical problem? An empirical perspective on the nature of ethical problems in general practice.Annette Joy Braunack-Mayer - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (2):98-103.
    Next SectionWhilst there has been considerable debate about the fit between moral theory and moral reasoning in everyday life, the way in which moral problems are defined has rarely been questioned. This paper presents a qualitative analysis of interviews conducted with 15 general practitioners (GPs) in South Australia to argue that the way in which the bioethics literature defines an ethical dilemma captures only some of the range of lay views about the nature of ethical problems. The bioethics literature has (...)
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  2.  39
    Mandatory Cancer Risk Warnings on Alcoholic Beverages: What Are the Ethical Issues?Jennie Louise, Jaklin Eliott, Ian Olver & Annette Braunack-Mayer - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (3):3-11.
    The link between alcohol consumption and cancer is well established, but public awareness of the risk remains low. Mandated warning labels have been suggested as a way of ensuring “informed choice” about alcohol consumption. In this article we explore various ethical issues that may arise in connection with cancer warning labels on alcoholic beverages; in particular we highlight the potentially questionable autonomy of alcohol consumption decisions and consider the implications if the autonomy of drinking behavior is substantially compromised. Our discussion (...)
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  3.  29
    Sharing precision medicine data with private industry: Outcomes of a citizens’ jury in Singapore.Angela Ballantyne, Tamra Lysaght, Hui Jin Toh, Serene Ong, Andrew Lau, G. Owen Schaefer, Vicki Xafis, E. Shyong Tai, Ainsley J. Newson, Stacy Carter, Chris Degeling & Annette Braunack-Mayer - 2022 - Big Data and Society 9 (1).
    Precision medicine is an emerging approach to treatment and disease prevention that relies on linkages between very large datasets of health information that is shared amongst researchers and health professionals. While studies suggest broad support for sharing precision medicine data with researchers at publicly funded institutions, there is reluctance to share health information with private industry for research and development. As the private sector is likely to play an important role in generating public benefits from precision medicine initiatives, it is (...)
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  4.  33
    Community perspectives on the benefits and risks of technologically enhanced communicable disease surveillance systems: a report on four community juries.Chris Degeling, Stacy M. Carter, Antoine M. van Oijen, Jeremy McAnulty, Vitali Sintchenko, Annette Braunack-Mayer, Trent Yarwood, Jane Johnson & Gwendolyn L. Gilbert - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-14.
    Background Outbreaks of infectious disease cause serious and costly health and social problems. Two new technologies – pathogen whole genome sequencing and Big Data analytics – promise to improve our capacity to detect and control outbreaks earlier, saving lives and resources. However, routinely using these technologies to capture more detailed and specific personal information could be perceived as intrusive and a threat to privacy. Method Four community juries were convened in two demographically different Sydney municipalities and two regional cities in (...)
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  5.  60
    Should There Be a Female Age Limit on Public Funding for Assisted Reproductive Technology?: Differing Conceptions of Justice in Resource Allocation.Drew Carter, Amber M. Watt, Annette Braunack-Mayer, Adam G. Elshaug, John R. Moss & Janet E. Hiller - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):79-91.
    Should there be a female age limit on public funding for assisted reproductive technology (ART)? The question bears significant economic and sociopolitical implications and has been contentious in many countries. We conceptualise the question as one of justice in resource allocation, using three much-debated substantive principles of justice—the capacity to benefit, personal responsibility, and need—to structure and then explore a complex of arguments. Capacity-to-benefit arguments are not decisive: There are no clear cost-effectiveness grounds to restrict funding to those older women (...)
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  6.  48
    The ethics of Community Empowerment: tensions in health promotion theory and practice.A. Braunack-Mayer & J. Louise - unknown
    Copyright © 2008 by International Union for Health Promotion and Education.
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  7.  50
    The appeal to nature implicit in certain restrictions on public funding for assisted reproductive technology.Drew Carter & Annette Braunack-Mayer - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (8):463-471.
    Certain restrictions on public funding for assisted reproductive technology (ART) are articulated and defended by recourse to a distinction between medical infertility and social infertility. We propose that underlying the prioritization of medical infertility is a vision of medicine whose proper role is to restore but not to improve upon nature. We go on to mark moral responses that speak of investments many continue to make in nature as properly an object of reverence and gratitude and therein (sometimes) a source (...)
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  8. A randomised controlled trial to compare opt-in and opt-out parental consent for childhood vaccine safety surveillance using data linkage.Jesia G. Berry, Philip Ryan, Michael S. Gold, Annette J. Braunack-Mayer & Katherine M. Duszynski - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10):619-625.
    Introduction No consent for health and medical research is appropriate when the criteria for a waiver of consent are met, yet some ethics committees and data custodians still require informed consent. Methods A single-blind parallel-group randomised controlled trial: 1129 families of children born at a South Australian hospital were sent information explaining data linkage of childhood immunisation and hospital records for vaccine safety surveillance with 4 weeks to opt in or opt out by reply form, telephone or email. A subsequent (...)
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  9.  62
    Social justice and pandemic influenza planning: The role of communication strategies.Connal Lee, Wendy A. Rogers & Annette Braunack-Mayer - 2008 - Public Health Ethics 1 (3):223-234.
    Department of Medical Education, Flinders University of South Australia, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001. Tel. : +61-8-7225-1111; Fax: +61-8-8204-5675; Email: lee0359{at}flinders.edu.au ' + u + '@ ' + d + ' '/ /- ->.This paper analyses the role of communication strategies in pandemic influenza planning. Our central concern is with the extent to which nations are using communication to address issues of social justice. Issues associated with disadvantage and vulnerability to infection in the event of an influenza pandemic raise (...)
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  10.  68
    Practical, epistemic and normative implications of algorithmic bias in healthcare artificial intelligence: a qualitative study of multidisciplinary expert perspectives.Yves Saint James Aquino, Stacy M. Carter, Nehmat Houssami, Annette Braunack-Mayer, Khin Than Win, Chris Degeling, Lei Wang & Wendy A. Rogers - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Background There is a growing concern about artificial intelligence (AI) applications in healthcare that can disadvantage already under-represented and marginalised groups (eg, based on gender or race). Objectives Our objectives are to canvas the range of strategies stakeholders endorse in attempting to mitigate algorithmic bias, and to consider the ethical question of responsibility for algorithmic bias. Methodology The study involves in-depth, semistructured interviews with healthcare workers, screening programme managers, consumer health representatives, regulators, data scientists and developers. Results Findings reveal considerable (...)
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  11.  20
    Conflicts of interest in divisions of general practice.N. Palmer, A. Braunack-Mayer, W. Rogers, C. Provis & G. Cullity - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (12):715-717.
    Community-based healthcare organisations manage competing, and often conflicting, priorities. These conflicts can arise from the multiple roles these organisations take up, and from the diverse range of stakeholders to whom they must be responsive. Often such conflicts may be titled conflicts of interest; however, what precisely constitutes such conflicts and what should be done about them is not always clear. Clarity about the duties owed by organisations and the roles they assume can help identify and manage some of these conflicts. (...)
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  12.  44
    What makes a good GP? An empirical perspective on virtue in general practice.A. Braunack-Mayer - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (2):82-87.
    This paper takes a virtuist approach to medical ethics to explore, from an empirical angle, ideas about settled ways of living a good life. Qualitative research methods were used to analyse the ways in which a group of 15 general practitioners articulated notions of good doctoring and the virtues in their work. I argue that the GPs, whose talk is analysed here, defined good general practice in terms of the ideals of accessibility, comprehensiveness, and continuity. They regarded these ideals significant (...)
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  13.  47
    Ethical issues in funding research and development of drugs for neglected tropical diseases.L. Oprea, A. Braunack-Mayer & C. A. Gericke - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (5):310-314.
    Neglected and tropical diseases, pervasive in developing countries, are important contributors to global health inequalities. They remain largely untreated due to lack of effective and affordable treatments. Resource-poor countries cannot afford to develop the public health interventions needed to control neglected diseases. In addition, neglected diseases do not represent an attractive market for pharmaceutical industry. Although a number of international commitments, stated in the Millennium Development Goals, have been made to avert the risk of communicable diseases, tropical diseases still remain (...)
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  14.  53
    An ethical voice in the silence of aphasia: Judging understanding and consent in people with aphasia.A. Braunack-Mayer & D. Hersh - 2001 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 12 (4):388-396.
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  15.  36
    Teaching Ethics with 'Cholera and Nothing More'.A. Braunack-Mayer - 2010 - Public Health Ethics 3 (1):78-79.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  16.  11
    Why is Pain Still Under‐Treated in the Emergency Department? Two New Hypotheses.Drew Carter, Paul Sendziuk, Jaklin A. Eliott & Annette Braunack-Mayer - 2015 - Bioethics 30 (3):195-202.
    Across the world, pain is under-treated in emergency departments. We canvass the literature testifying to this problem, the reasons why this problem is so important, and then some of the main hypotheses that have been advanced in explanation of the problem. We then argue for the plausibility of two new hypotheses: pain's under-treatment in the ED is due partly to an epistemic preference for signs over symptoms on the part of some practitioners, and some ED practices that themselves worsen pain (...)
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  17.  10
    Seeking community views on allocation of scarce resources in a pandemic in Australia: Two methods, two answers.J. Street, H. Marshall, A. Braunack-Mayer, W. Rogers, P. Ryan & The Fluviews Team - 2016 - In Susan Dodds & Rachel A. Ankeny (eds.), Big Picture Bioethics: Developing Democratic Policy in Contested Domains. Cham: Imprint: Springer.
    This book addresses the problem of how to make democratically-legitimate public policy on issues of contentious bioethical debate. It focuses on ethical contests about research and their legitimate resolution, while addressing questions of political legitimacy. How should states make public policy on issues where there is ethical disagreement, not only about appropriate outcomes, but even what values are at stake? What constitutes justified, democratic policy in such conflicted domains? Case studies from Canada and Australia demonstrate that two countries sharing historical (...)
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  18.  10
    Ethics and law for the health professions: Edited by Ian Kerridge, Michael Lowe and John McPheeSydney: Federation Press, 2005. [REVIEW]Annette Braunack-Mayer, Sandy Elkin, Pauline Norris & Hamish J. Wilson - 2005 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 2 (3):177-182.
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