Results for 'Legalisation'

76 found
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  1.  6
    The Legalisation of Ethical Governance in Taiwan Biobank Development.Fan Chien Ta & Lin Wan-Shiuan - 2011 - Asian Bioethics Review 3 (2):85-99.
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  2.  53
    Surveys on Attitudes Towards Legalisation of Euthanasia: Importance of Question Phrasing.J. Hagelin - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (6):521-523.
    Aim: To explore whether the phrasing of the questions and the response alternatives would influence the answers to questions about legalisation of euthanasia.Methods: Results were compared from two different surveys in populations with similar characteristics. The alternatives “positive”, “negative”, and “don’t know” were replaced with an explanatory text, “no legal sanction”, four types of legal sanctions, and no possibility to answer “don’t know” . Four undergraduate student groups answered.Results: In the first questionnaire 43% accepted euthanasia , 14% did not, (...)
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  3. Euthanasia, Ethics, and Public Policy: An Argument Against Legalisation.John Keown - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    Whether the law should permit voluntary euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide is one of the most vital questions facing all modern societies. Internationally, the main obstacle to legalisation has proved to be the objection that, even if they were morally acceptable in certain 'hard cases', voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide could not be effectively controlled; society would slide down a 'slippery slope' to the killing of patients who did not make a free and informed request, or for whom palliative care (...)
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  4.  18
    The Legalisation of Voluntary Euthanasia in the Northern Territory.Peter Singer - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (4):419–424.
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  5.  18
    Survey of Doctors' Opinions of the Legalisation of Physician Assisted Suicide.William Lee, Annabel Price, Lauren Rayner & Matthew Hotopf - 2009 - BMC Medical Ethics 10 (1):2-.
    BackgroundAssisted dying has wide support among the general population but there is evidence that those providing care for the dying may be less supportive. Senior doctors would be involved in implementing the proposed change in the law. We aimed to measure support for legalising physician assisted dying in a representative sample of senior doctors in England and Wales, and to assess any association between doctors' characteristics and level of support for a change in the law.MethodsWe conducted a postal survey of (...)
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  6.  1
    The Legalisation of Voluntary Euthanasia in the Northern Territory.Peter Singer - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (4):419-424.
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  7.  1
    The Legalisation of Voluntary Euthanasia in the Northern Territory.Peter Singer - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (5):419.
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  8.  16
    Legalisierung der aktiven Sterbehilfe – Förderung oder Beeinträchtigung der individuellen Autonomie?Does the legalisation of active euthanasia strengthen or impair individual autonomy?Frank Dietrich - 2009 - Ethik in der Medizin 21 (4):275-288.
    Theorists who support the legalisation of active euthanasia usually base their arguments on the principle of autonomy. In their view the wish of a severely ill person not to continue his or her life must be respected. However, some opponents of the legalisation of active euthanasia refer to the principle of autonomy as well. They are concerned that patients may be held responsible for burdening others with the provision of care. Thus family members, physicians or nurses may exert (...)
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  9.  15
    John Keown: Euthanasia, ethics and public policy: an argument against legalisation, 2nd edition.Carlos Gómez-Vírseda - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (1):61-66.
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  10.  12
    John Keown: Euthanasia, Ethics and Public Policy: An Argument Against Legalisation, 2nd Edition: Cambridge University Press, 2018, 531 Pp, $24.78 (Paperback), ISBN: 978-1-107-61833-6. [REVIEW]Carlos Gómez-Vírseda - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (1):61-66.
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  11.  5
    Une Conséquence Inattendue de la Modification de L’Article 16-3 du Code Civil : La Légalisation de la Circoncision Rituelle « Médicalisée ». [REVIEW]P. Gourdon - 2003 - Médecine et Droit 2003 (59):43-48.
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  12. The Morality of Euthanasia.Adam Greif - 2019 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 26 (4):612–634.
    In this paper, I defend the view that the requested euthanasia of adults is morally permissible and should be legalised; I use an argument from analogy which compares physician-assisted euthanasia with morally less ambiguous and, in my opinion, an acceptable instance of mercy killing. I also respond to several objections that either try to prove that the instance of mercy killing is not acceptable, or that there is a fundamental difference between these two cases of killing. Furthermore, in the remainder (...)
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  13.  32
    The Case for Physician Assisted Suicide: Not (yet) Proven.B. Steinbock - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (4):235-241.
    The legalisation of physician assisted suicide in Oregon and physician assisted death in the Netherlands has revitalised the debate over whether and under what conditions individuals should be able to determine the time and manner of their deaths, and whether they should be able to enlist the help of physicians in doing so. Although the change in the law is both dramatic and recent, the basic arguments for and against have not really changed since the issue was debated by (...)
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  14.  62
    Legal Physician-Assisted Dying in Oregon and the Netherlands: Evidence Concerning the Impact on Patients in "Vulnerable" Groups.M. P. Battin, A. van der Heide, L. Ganzini, G. van der Wal & B. D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (10):591-597.
    Background: Debates over legalisation of physician-assisted suicide or euthanasia often warn of a “slippery slope”, predicting abuse of people in vulnerable groups. To assess this concern, the authors examined data from Oregon and the Netherlands, the two principal jurisdictions in which physician-assisted dying is legal and data have been collected over a substantial period.Methods: The data from Oregon comprised all annual and cumulative Department of Human Services reports 1998–2006 and three independent studies; the data from the Netherlands comprised all (...)
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  15.  48
    Euthanasia: Agreeing to Disagree? [REVIEW]Søren Holm - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):399-402.
    In discussions about the legalisation of active, voluntary euthanasia it is sometimes claimed that what should happen in a liberal society is that the two sides in the debate “agree to disagree”. This paper explores what is entailed by agreeing to disagree and shows that this is considerably more complicated than what is usually believed to be the case. Agreeing to disagree is philosophically problematic and will often lead to an unstable compromise.
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  16. Addiction and Autonomy: Can Addicted People Consent to the Prescription of Their Drug of Addiction?Bennett Foddy & Julian Savulescu - 2006 - Bioethics 20 (1):1–15.
    It is often claimed that the autonomy of heroin addicts is compromised when they are choosing between taking their drug of addiction and abstaining. This is the basis of claims that they are incompetent to give consent to be prescribed heroin. We reject these claims on a number of empirical and theoretical grounds. First we argue that addicts are likely to be sober, and thus capable of rational thought, when approaching researchers to participate in research. We reject behavioural evidence purported (...)
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  17.  67
    Should Assisted Dying Be Legalised?Thomas D. G. Frost, Devan Sinha & Barnabas J. Gilbert - 2014 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 9:3.
    When an individual facing intractable pain is given an estimate of a few months to live, does hastening death become a viable and legitimate alternative for willing patients? Has the time come for physicians to do away with the traditional notion of healthcare as maintaining or improving physical and mental health, and instead accept their own limitations by facilitating death when requested? The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge held the 2013 Varsity Medical Debate on the motion “This House Would Legalise (...)
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  18.  48
    Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide: Knowledge, Attitudes and Experiences of Nurses in Andalusia (Spain).M. -I. Tamayo-Velazquez, P. Simon-Lorda & M. Cruz-Piqueras - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (5):677-691.
    The aim of this study is to assess the knowledge, attitudes and experiences of Spanish nurses in relation to euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. In an online questionnaire completed by 390 nurses from Andalusia, 59.1% adequately identified a euthanasia situation and 64.1% a situation involving physician-assisted suicide. Around 69% were aware that both practices were illegal in Spain, while 21.4% had received requests for euthanasia and a further 7.8% for assisted suicide. A total of 22.6% believed that cases of euthanasia had (...)
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  19.  5
    The Division of Advisory Labour: The Case of ‘Mitochondrial Donation’.Tim Lewens - 2019 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 9 (1):1-24.
    The UK-based deliberations that led up to the legalisation of two new ‘mitochondrial donation’ techniques in 2015, and which continued after that time as regulatory details were determined, featured a division of advisory labour that is common when decisions are made about new technologies. An expert panel was convened by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, charged with assessing the scientific and technical aspects of these techniques. Meanwhile, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics addressed the ethical issues. While this division (...)
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  20.  97
    Attitudes to Physician and Family Assisted Suicide: Results From a Study of Public Attitudes in Britain.C. O'Neill - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (1):52-52.
    Legalisation of assisted suicide presents a dilemma for society. This arises because of a lack of consensus regarding the precedence to be accorded freedom of choice versus the inviolability of human life. A combination of factors has served to throw this dilemma into sharper focus in recent times. These include population aging,1,2 increased openness regarding end-of-life care,3 development of patients' rights, and increasing secularisation and multiculturalism in society. Against this backdrop and within a context where several countries have addressed (...)
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  21.  16
    Learning to Do No Harm.Grant R. Gillett - 1993 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (3):253-268.
    The legalisation of euthanasia creates a certain tension when it is compared with those traditional medical principles that seem to embody respect for the sanctity of life. It also creates a real need for us to explore what we mean by harm in relation to dying patients. When we consider that we must train physicians so that they not only understand ethical issues but also show the virtues in their clinical practice, it becomes important for us to strive to (...)
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  22.  35
    Being, Doing, and Knowing: Developing Ethical Competence in Health Care. [REVIEW]S. Eriksson, G. Helgesson & A. T. Höglund - 2007 - Journal of Academic Ethics 5 (2-4):207-216.
    There is a growing interest in ethical competence-building within nursing and health care practising. This tendency is accompanied by a remarkable growth of ethical guidelines. Ethical demands have also been laid down in laws. Present-day practitioners and researchers in health care are thereby left in a virtual cross-fire of various legislations, codes, and recommendations, all intended to guide behaviour. The aim of this paper was to investigate the role of ethical guidelines in the process of ethical competence-building within health care (...)
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  23.  14
    The Division of Advisory Labour: The Case of ‘Mitochondrial Donation’.Tim Lewens - 2018 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 9 (1):10.
    The UK-based deliberations that led up to the legalisation of two new ‘mitochondrial donation’ techniques in 2015, and which continued after that time as regulatory details were determined, featured a division of advisory labour that is common when decisions are made about new technologies. An expert panel was convened by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, charged with assessing the scientific and technical aspects of these techniques. Meanwhile, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics addressed the ethical issues. While this division (...)
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  24.  56
    Abortion, Infanticide and Allowing Babies to Die, 40 Years On.Julian Savulescu - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):257-259.
    In January 2012, the Journal of Medical Ethics published online Giubilini and Minerva's paper, ‘After-birth abortion. Why should the baby live?’.1 The Journal publishes articles based on the quality of their argument, their contribution to the existing literature, and relevance to current medicine. This article met those criteria. It created unprecedented global outrage for a paper published in an academic medical ethics journal. In this special issue of the Journal, Giubilini and Minerva's paper comes to print along with 31 articles (...)
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  25. Assisted Suicide and the Killing of People? Maybe. Physician-Assisted Suicide and the Killing of Patients? No: The Rejection of Shaw's New Perspective on Euthanasia.H. V. McLachlan - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (5):306-309.
    David Shaw presents a new argument to support the old claim that there is not a significant moral difference between killing and letting die and, by implication, between active and passive euthanasia. He concludes that doctors should not make a distinction between them. However, whether or not killing and letting die are morally equivalent is not as important a question as he suggests. One can justify legal distinctions on non-moral grounds. One might oppose physician- assisted suicide and active euthanasia when (...)
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  26.  4
    Neuro-Doping and Fairness.Thomas Søbirk Petersen & Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-12.
    In this article, we critically discuss different versions of the fairness objection to the legalisation of neuro-doping. According to this objection, legalising neuro-doping will result in some enjoying an unfair advantage over others. Basically, we assess four versions. These focus on: 1) the unequal opportunities of winning for athletes who use neuro-doping and for those who do not; 2) the unfair advantages specifically for wealthy athletes; 3) the unfairness of athletic advantages not derived from athletes’ own training ; and (...)
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  27. Torture and the Ticking Bomb.Bob Brecher - 2007 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    This timely and passionate book is the first to address itself to Harvard Law Professor Alan Dershowitz’s controversial arguments for the limited use of interrogational torture and its legalisation. Argues that the respectability Dershowitz's arguments confer on the view that torture is a legitimate weapon in the war on terror needs urgently to be countered Takes on the advocates of torture on their own utilitarian grounds Timely and passionately written, in an accessible, jargon-free style Forms part of the provocative (...)
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  28.  53
    Select This Article Paper: Legal Physician-Assisted Suicide in Oregon and The Netherlands: Evidence Concerning the Impact on Patients in Vulnerable Groups—Another Perspective on Oregon's Data.I. G. Finlay & R. George - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (3):171-174.
    Battin et al examined data on deaths from physician-assisted suicide in Oregon and on PAS and voluntary euthanasia in The Netherlands. This paper reviews the methodology used in their examination and questions the conclusions drawn from it—namely, that there is for the most part ‘no evidence of heightened risk’ to vulnerable people from the legalisation of PAS or VE. This critique focuses on the evidence about PAS in Oregon. It suggests that vulnerability to PAS cannot be categorised simply by (...)
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  29.  6
    Commentary on ‘Expressivism at the Beginning and End of Life’.Felicia Nimue Ackerman - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (8):548-549.
    Death can be good— I’ll tell you how. Just have it come Decades from now.1 Full disclosure: The above poem expresses my outlook, and I have trouble empathising with people who want to die. But that does not make me unable to evaluate objections to the expressivist argument against PAS. Reed sets forth the expressivist argument as follows: ‘[W]hen we allow PAS for individuals who are terminally ill or facing some severe disease or disability, we send a message of disrespect (...)
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  30. News Media Coverage of Euthanasia: A Content Analysis of Dutch National Newspapers. [REVIEW]Rosemarie D. L. C. Bernabe, Ghislaine J. M. W. Van Thiel, Jan A. M. Raaijmakers & Johannes J. M. Van Delden - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):6-.
    BackgroundThe Netherlands is one of the few countries where euthanasia is legal under strict conditions. This study investigates whether Dutch newspaper articles use the term ‘euthanasia’ according to the legal definition and determines what arguments for and against euthanasia they contain.MethodsWe did an electronic search of seven Dutch national newspapers between January 2009 and May 2010 and conducted a content analysis.ResultsOf the 284 articles containing the term ‘euthanasia’, 24% referred to practices outside the scope of the law, mostly relating to (...)
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  31.  49
    Attitudes Toward Physician-Assisted Suicide Among Physicians in Vermont.A. Craig, B. Cronin, W. Eward, J. Metz, L. Murray, G. Rose, E. Suess & M. E. Vergara - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (7):400-403.
    Background: Legislation on physician-assisted suicide is being considered in a number of states since the passage of the Oregon Death With Dignity Act in 1994. Opinion assessment surveys have historically assessed particular subsets of physicians.Objective: To determine variables predictive of physicians’ opinions on PAS in a rural state, Vermont, USA.Design: Cross-sectional mailing survey.Participants: 1052 physicians licensed by the state of Vermont.Results: Of the respondents, 38.2% believed PAS should be legalised, 16.0% believed it should be prohibited and 26.0% believed it should (...)
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  32.  48
    Torture and the Ticking Bomb.Bob Brecher - 2008 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    This timely and passionate book is the first to address itself to Harvard Law Professor Alan Dershowitz’s controversial arguments for the limited use of interrogational torture and its legalisation. Argues that the respectability Dershowitz's arguments confer on the view that torture is a legitimate weapon in the war on terror needs urgently to be countered Takes on the advocates of torture on their own utilitarian grounds Timely and passionately written, in an accessible, jargon-free style Forms part of the provocative (...)
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  33. The Legislation of Active Voluntary Euthanasia in Australia: Will the Slippery Slope Prove Fatal?I. H. Kerridge & K. R. Mitchell - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (5):273-278.
    At 2.00 am on the morning of May 24, 1995 the Northern Territory Legislative Assembly Australia passed the Rights of the Terminally Ill Act by the narrow margin of 15 votes to 10. The act permits a terminally ill patient of sound mind and over the age of 18 years, and who is either in pain or suffering, or distress, to request a medical practitioner to assist the patient to terminate his or her life. Thus, Australia can lay claim to (...)
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  34.  11
    Paper: Sexual Rights and Disability.Ezio Di Nucci - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (3):158-161.
    This paper argues against Appel's recent proposal—in this journal—that there is a fundamental human right to sexual pleasure, and that therefore the sexual pleasure of severely disabled people should be publicly funded—by thereby partially legalising prostitution. An alternative is proposed that does not need to pose a new positive human right; does not need public funding; does not need the legalisation of prostitution; and that would offer a better experience to the severely disabled: charitable non-profit organisations whose members would (...)
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  35.  42
    French Hospital Nurses' Opinion About Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide: A National Phone Survey.M. K. Bendiane, A.-D. Bouhnik, A. Galinier, R. Favre, Y. Obadia & P. Peretti-Watel - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (4):238-244.
    Background: Hospital nurses are frequently the first care givers to receive a patient’s request for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (PAS). In France, there is no consensus over which medical practices should be considered euthanasia, and this lack of consensus blurred the debate about euthanasia and PAS legalisation. This study aimed to investigate French hospital nurses’ opinions towards both legalisations, including personal conceptions of euthanasia and working conditions and organisation. Methods: A phone survey conducted among a random national sample of (...)
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  36.  2
    Expressivism at the Beginning and End of Life.John Keown - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (8):545-546.
    Philip Reed’s interesting and welcome comparison of the expressivist case against, on the one hand, prenatal testing and abortion and, on the other, physician-assisted suicide and voluntary active euthanasia, indicates the relevance of the expressivist case against the latter and its resilience to criticisms of the expressivist case against the former. Advocates of PAS/VAE commonly argue that they should be lawful out of respect for autonomy: everyone has the right to choose a physician-hastened death if they meet specified conditions such (...)
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  37.  69
    Babies, Child Bearers and Commodification: Anderson, Brazier Et Al., and the Political Economy of Commercial Surrogate Motherhood. [REVIEW]Hugh V. McLachlan & J. K. Swales - 2000 - Health Care Analysis 8 (1):1-18.
    It is argued by Anderson and also in the BrazierReport that Commercial Surrogate Motherhood (C.S.M.)contracts and agencies should be illegal on thegrounds that C.S.M. involves the commodification ofboth mothers and babies. This paper takes issue withthis view and argues that C.S.M. is not inconsistentwith the proper respect for, and treatment of,children and women. A case for the legalisation ofC.S.M. is made.
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  38.  7
    Transformative Illegality: How Condoms ‘Became Legal’ in Ireland, 1991–1993.Máiréad Enright & Emilie Cloatre - 2018 - Feminist Legal Studies 26 (3):261-284.
    This paper examines Irish campaigns for condom access in the early 1990s. Against the backdrop of the AIDS crisis, activists campaigned against a law which would not allow condoms to be sold from ordinary commercial spaces or vending machines, and restricted sale to young people. Advancing a conception of ‘transformative illegality’, we show that illegal action was fundamental to the eventual legalisation of commercial condom sale. However, rather than foregrounding illegal condom sale as a mode of spectacular direct action, (...)
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  39.  83
    Management of Death, Dying and Euthanasia: Attitudes and Practices of Medical Practitioners in South Australia.C. A. Stevens & R. Hassan - 1994 - Journal of Medical Ethics 20 (1):41-46.
    This article presents the first results of a study of the decisions made by health professionals in South Australia concerning the management of death, dying, and euthanasia, and focuses on the findings concerning the attitudes and practices of medical practitioners. Mail-back, self-administered questionnaires were posted in August 1991 to a ten per cent sample of 494 medical practitioners in South Australia randomly selected from the list published by the Medical Board of South Australia. A total response rate of 68 per (...)
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  40. The Case for Physician Assisted Suicide: How Can It Possibly Be Proven?Edgar Dahl & Neil Levy - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (6):335-338.
    In her paper, The case for physician assisted suicide: not proven, Bonnie Steinbock argues that the experience with Oregon’s Death with Dignity Act fails to demonstrate that the benefits of legalising physician assisted suicide outweigh its risks. Given that her verdict is based on a small number of highly controversial cases that will most likely occur under any regime of legally implemented safeguards, she renders it virtually impossible to prove the case for physician assisted suicide. In this brief paper, we (...)
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  41.  52
    What We Owe to Terminally III Patients: The Option of Physician-Assisted Suicide.Hon-Lam Li - 2016 - Asian Bioethics Review 8 (3):224-243.
    This paper examines whether physician-assisted suicide is morally permissible, and whether it should be legalised in the sense that those seeking or performing such procedure will be immune from prosecution. The issues of moral and legal permissibility1 are closely connected. One way to argue for the permissibility of PAS is grounded in the argument that a patient has the right to refuse life-saving equipment, or to have it withdrawn,2 and then to further argue that there is no relevant distinction between (...)
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  42.  25
    ‘God’ in Public Reason.Nigel Biggar - 2006 - Studies in Christian Ethics 19 (1):9-19.
    The recent suicide bombings in London by young Islamists should remind Christian theologians that they are committed to a liberal polity of some kind. But is a genuinely theological liberalism possible? Many still think that public reason in a liberal polity must be universally accessible and therefore ‘secular’; and that it requires those with religious convictions to strip their public speech of theology. Such is the position taken by Jürgen Habermas in a recent newspaper interview. But is Habermas correct to (...)
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  43.  20
    Euthanasia: Above Ground, Below Ground.R. S. Magnusson - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (5):441-446.
    The key to the euthanasia debate lies in how best to regulate what doctors do. Opponents of euthanasia frequently warn of the possible negative consequences of legalising physician assisted suicide and active euthanasia while ignoring the covert practice of PAS/AE by doctors and other health professionals. Against the background of survey studies suggesting that anything from 4% to 10% of doctors have intentionally assisted a patient to die, and interview evidence of the unregulated, idiosyncratic nature of underground PAS/AE, this paper (...)
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  44.  15
    Ethics Briefings.Martin Davies, Sophie Brannan, Eleanor Chrispin, Veronica English, Rebecca Mussell & Julian Sheather - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):191-192.
    This year marks the 10th anniversary of the Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003.1 i The Act makes it an offence for any person to excise, infibulate or otherwise mutilate the whole or any part of a female's labia majora, labia minora or clitoris, or to aid, abet, counsel or procure the mutilation by another person. The exception is where a surgical or obstetric procedure is clinically indicated. There has long been UK legalisation against female genital mutilation but the 2003 (...)
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  45.  48
    End-of-Life Decisions in Medical Practice: A Survey of Doctors in Victoria (Australia).D. A. Neil, C. A. J. Coady, J. Thompson & H. Kuhse - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (12):721-725.
    Objectives: To discover the current state of opinion and practice among doctors in Victoria, Australia, regarding end-of-life decisions and the legalisation of voluntary euthanasia. Longitudinal comparison with similar 1987 and 1993 studies.Design and participants: Cross-sectional postal survey of doctors in Victoria.Results: 53% of doctors in Victoria support the legalisation of voluntary euthanasia. Of doctors who have experienced requests from patients to hasten death, 35% have administered drugs with the intention of hastening death. There is substantial disagreement among doctors (...)
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  46.  53
    Doctor-Cared Dying Instead of Physician-Assisted Suicide: A Perspective From Germany. [REVIEW]Fuat S. Oduncu & Stephan Sahm - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):371-381.
    The current article deals with the ethics and practice of physician-assisted suicide (PAS) and dying. The debate about PAS must take the important legal and ethical context of medical acts at the end of life into consideration, and cannot be examined independently from physicians’ duties with respect to care for the terminally ill and dying. The discussion in Germany about active euthanasia, limiting medical intervention at the end of life, patient autonomy, advanced directives, and PAS is not fundamentally different in (...)
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  47.  45
    Senior Doctors' Opinions of Rational Suicide.S. Ginn, A. Price, L. Rayner, G. S. Owen, R. D. Hayes, M. Hotopf & W. Lee - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (12):723-726.
    Context The attitudes of medical professionals towards physician assisted dying have been widely discussed. Less explored is the level of agreement among physicians on the possibility of ‘rational suicide’—a considered suicide act made by a sound mind and a precondition of assisted dying legislation. Objective To assess attitudes towards rational suicide in a representative sample of senior doctors in England and Wales. Methods A postal survey was conducted of 1000 consultants and general practitioners randomly selected from a commercially available database. (...)
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  48.  48
    'Aid-in-Dying' and the Taking of Human Life.C. S. Campbell - 1992 - Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (3):128-134.
    In several US states, the legalisation of euthanasia has become a question for voters to decide in public referenda. This democratic approach in politics is consistent with notions of personal autonomy in medicine, but the right of choice does not mean all choices are morally equal. A presumption against the taking of human life is embedded in the formative moral traditions of society; human life does not have absolute value, but we do and should impose a strict burden of (...)
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  49.  23
    French District Nurses' Opinions Towards Euthanasia, Involvement in End-of-Life Care and Nurse Patient Relationship: A National Phone Survey.M. Bendiane, A. Galinier, R. Favre, C. Ribiere, J.-M. Lapiana, Y. Obadia & P. Peretti-Watel - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (12):708-711.
    Objectives: To assess French district nurses’ opinions towards euthanasia and to study factors associated with these opinions, with emphasis on attitudes towards terminal patients.Design and setting: An anonymous telephone survey carried out in 2005 among a national random sample of French district nurses.Participants: District nurses currently delivering home care who have at least 1 year of professional experience. Of 803 district nurses contacted, 602 agreed to participate .Main outcome measures: Opinion towards the legalisation of euthanasia , attitudes towards terminal (...)
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  50.  32
    Neonatal Euthanasia: A Claim for an Immoral Law.Serge Vanden Eijnden & Dana Martinovici - 2013 - Clinical Ethics 8 (2-3):75-84.
    Active ending of the life of a newborn baby is a crime. Yet its clandestine practise is a reality in several European countries. In this paper, we defend the necessity to institute a proper legal frame for what we define as active neonatal euthanasia. The only legal attempt so far, the Dutch Groningen protocol, is not satisfactory. We critically analyse this protocol, as well as several other clinical practises and philosophical stances. Furthermore, we have tried to integrate our opinions as (...)
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