Results for 'Midgley Katherine'

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  1.  6
    An ERP Investigation of L2–L1 Translation Priming in Adult Learners.Gabriela Meade, Katherine J. Midgley & Phillip J. Holcomb - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  2.  9
    Language Effects in Trilinguals: An ERP Study.Xavier Aparicio, Katherine J. Midgley, Phillip J. Holcomb, He Pu, Jean-Marc Lavaur & Jonathan Grainger - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  3.  8
    Electrophysiology of Sentence Processing in Aphasia: Prosodic Cues and Thematic Fit.Sheppard Shannon, Midgley Katherine, Love Tracy, Yang Dorothy, Holcomb Phillip & Shapiro Lewis - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  4.  33
    The Essential Mary Midgley.Mary Midgley - 2005 - Routledge.
    Feared and admired in equal measure, Mary Midgely has carefully, yet profoundly challenged many of the scientific and moral orthodoxies of the twentieth century. The Essential Mary Midgley collects for the first time the very best of this famous philosopher's work, described by the Financial Times as "commonsense philosophy of the highest order." This anthology includes carefully chosen selections from her best-selling books, including Wickedness, Beast and Man, Science and Poetry and The Myths We Live By . It provides (...)
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  5.  5
    The Essential Mary Midgley.David Midgley (ed.) - 2005 - Routledge.
    Feared and admired in equal measure, Mary Midgley has carefully yet profoundly challenged many of the scientific and moral orthodoxies of the twentieth century. The Essential Mary Midgley collects for the first time the very best of this famous philosopher's work, described by the Financial Times as 'common sense philosophy of the highest order'. This unrivalled introduction to a great philosopher and brilliant writer incorporates carefully selected excerpts from Mary Midgley's bestselling books, including Wickedness, Beast and Man (...)
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  6.  25
    The Ethical Primate. Anthony Freeman in Discussion with Mary Midgley.M. Midgley & A. Freeman - 1995 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (1):67-75.
    [opening paragraph}: The latest book by moral philosopher Mary Midgley prompted Anthony Freeman to consider some of the cultural and ethical aspects of consciousness and to discuss them with the author. What have ethics to do with consciousness? First, it is consciousness that makes morality possible. Second, neither subject fits comfortably into currently popular reductive schemes. As a consequence both have tended to be isolated in a ghetto, shut off from the rest of the intellectual scene. So believes Mary (...)
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  7. The Essential Mary Midgley.David Midgley (ed.) - 2004 - Routledge.
    Feared and admired in equal measure, Mary Midgley has carefully yet profoundly challenged many of the scientific and moral orthodoxies of the twentieth century. _The Essential Mary Midgley _collects for the first time the very best of this famous philosopher's work, described by the _Financial Times_ as 'common sense philosophy of the highest order'. This unrivalled introduction to a great philosopher and brilliant writer incorporates carefully selected excerpts from Mary Midgley's bestselling books, including _Wickedness, Beast and Man_, (...)
     
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  8.  38
    The Concept of Beastliness: Philosophy, Ethics and Animal Behaviour: Mary Midgley.Mary Midgley - 1973 - Philosophy 48 (184):111-135.
    Every age has its pet contradictions. Thirty years ago, we used to accept Marx and Freud together, and then wonder, like the chameleon on the tartan, why life was so confusing. Today there is similar trouble over the question whether there is, or is not, something called Human Nature. On the one hand, there has been an explosion of animal behaviour studies, and comparisons between animals and men have become immensely popular. People use evidence from animals to decide whether man (...)
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  9.  44
    Midgley on Murdoch.Mary Midgley - 1999 - The Philosophers' Magazine 7:45-46.
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  10.  6
    On Being Terrestrial: Mary Midgley.Mary Midgley - 1984 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 17:79-91.
    We will start with a fable— There was once a creator who wanted to create free beings. The other creators, it seems, didn't share this ambition, indeed they thought his project was philosophically confused. They were well satisfied with their own worlds. But our creator sat down to work it out. ‘How will you even start?’ asked his friend D, the Doubter. ‘Well, I know what I won't do’, answered C. ‘I won't just give them an empty faculty named Desire, (...)
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  11.  7
    Midgley on Murdoch.Mary Midgley - 1999 - The Philosophers' Magazine 7:45-46.
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  12.  95
    Beast and Man: The Roots of Human Nature.Mary Midgley - 1978 - Routledge.
    Philosophers have traditionally concentrated on the qualities that make human beings different from other species. In _Beast and Man_ Mary Midgley, one of our foremost intellectuals, stresses continuities. What makes people tick? Largely, she asserts, the same things as animals. She tells us humans are rather more like other animals than we previously allowed ourselves to believe, and reminds us just how primitive we are in comparison to the sophistication of many animals. A veritable classic for our age, _Beast (...)
  13. Are You an Illusion?Mary Midgley - 2014 - Routledge.
    Renowned philosopher Mary Midgley explores the remarkable gap that has opened up between our own understanding of our sense of our self and today's scientific orthodoxy that claims the self to be nothing more than an elaborate illusion. Bringing her formidable acuity and analytic skills to bear, she exposes some very odd claims and muddled thinking on the part of cognitive scientists and psychologists when it comes to talk about the self. Well-known philosophical problems in causality, subjectivity, empiricism, free (...)
     
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  14.  72
    The Myths We Live By.Mary Midgley - 2003 - Routledge.
    Mary Midgley argues in her powerful new book that far from being the opposite of science, myth is a central part of it. In brilliant prose, she claims that myths are neither lies nor mere stories but a network of powerful symbols that suggest particular ways of interpreting the world.
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  15. Science and Poetry.Mary Midgley - 2001 - Routledge.
    Crude materialism, reduction of mind to body, extreme individualism. All products of a 17th century scientific inheritance which looks at the parts of our existence at the expense of the whole. Cutting through myths of scientific omnipotence, Mary Midgley explores how this inheritance has so powerfully shaped the way we are, and the problems it has brought with it. She argues that poetry and the arts can help reconcile these problems, and counteract generations of 'one-eyed specialists', unable and unwilling (...)
     
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  16. Science as Salvation: A Modern Myth and its Meaning.Mary Midgley - 1992 - Routledge.
    Science as Salvation discusses the high spiritual ambitions which tend to gather round the notion of science. Officially, science claims only the modest function of establishing facts. Yet people still hope for something much grander from it--namely, the myths by which to shape and support life in an increasingly confusing age. Our faith in science is abused by some scientists whose adolescent fantasies have spilled over into their professional lives. Salvation, immortality, mastery of the universe, humans without bodies, and intelligent (...)
  17. Science and Poetry.Mary Midgley - 2013 - Routledge.
    Crude materialism, reduction of mind to body, extreme individualism. All products of a 17th century scientific inheritance which looks at the parts of our existence at the expense of the whole. Cutting through myths of scientific omnipotence, Mary Midgley explores how this inheritance has so powerfully shaped the way we are, and the problems it has brought with it. She argues that poetry and the arts can help reconcile these problems, and counteract generations of 'one-eyed specialists', unable and unwilling (...)
     
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  18. The Myths We Live By.Mary Midgley - 2015 - Routledge.
    With a new Introduction by the author 'An elegant and sane little book. – _The New Statesman_ Myths, as Mary Midgley argues in this powerful book, are everywhere. In political thought they sit at the heart of theories of human nature and the social contract; in economics in the pursuit of self interest; and in science the idea of human beings as machines, which originates in the seventeenth century, is a today a potent force. Far from being the opposite (...)
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  19.  14
    Evolution as a Religion: Strange Hopes and Stranger Fears.Mary Midgley - 2002 - Routledge.
    According to a profile in The Guardian , Mary Midgley is 'the foremost scourge of scientific pretensions in this country; someone whose wit is admired even by those who feel she sometimes oversteps the mark'. Considered one of Britain's finest philosophers, Midgley exposes the illogical logic of poor doctrines that shelter themselves behind the prestige of science. Always at home when taking on the high priests of evolutionary theory - Dawkins, Wilson and their acolytes - she has famously (...)
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  20.  50
    Wisdom, Information, and Wonder: What is Knowledge For?Mary Midgley - 1989 - Routledge.
    InWisdom, Information and Wonder, Mary Midgley tackles the question at the root of our civilization: What is knowledge for?
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  21. The Owl of Minerva: A Memoir.Mary Midgley - 2005 - Routledge.
    "Charming, interesting, thought-provoking and a great read." Rosalind Hursthouse The daughter of a pacifist rector who answered "No!" when his congregation asked him "Is everything in the bible true?", perhaps Mary Midgley was destined to become a philosopher. Yet few would have thought this inquisitive, untidy, nature-loving child would become "one of the sharpest critical pens in the west." This is her remarkable story. Probably the only philosopher to have been in Vienna on the eve of its invasion by (...)
     
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  22. Heart and Mind: The Varieties of Moral Experience.Mary Midgley - 2003 - Routledge.
    With a new introduction by the author. It is a book of superb spirit and style, more entertaining than a work of philosophy has any right to be.’ – Times Literary Supplement. Throughout our lives we are making moral choices. Some decisions simply direct our everyday comings and goings; others affect our individual destinies. How do we make those choices? Where does our sense of right and wrong come from, and how can we make more informed decisions? In clear, entertaining (...)
     
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  23. The Myths We Live By.Mary Midgley - 2011 - Routledge.
    With a new Introduction by the author 'An elegant and sane little book. – _The New Statesman_ Myths, as Mary Midgley argues in this powerful book, are everywhere. In political thought they sit at the heart of theories of human nature and the social contract; in economics in the pursuit of self interest; and in science the idea of human beings as machines, which originates in the seventeenth century, is a today a potent force. Far from being the opposite (...)
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  24. Wickedness.Dr Mary Midgley & Mary Midgley - 2015 - Routledge.
    To look into the darkness of the human soul is a frightening venture. Here Mary Midgley does so, with her customary brilliance and clarity. Midgley's analysis proves that the capacity for real wickedness is an inevitable part of human nature. This is not however a blanket acceptance of evil. Out of this dark journey she returns with an offering to us: an understanding of human nature that enhances our very humanity.
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  25. Wickedness.Mary Midgley - 1984 - Routledge.
    To look into the darkness of the human soul is a frightening venture. Here Mary Midgley does so, with her customary brilliance and clarity. Midgley's analysis proves that the capacity for real wickedness is an inevitable part of human nature. This is not however a blanket acceptance of evil. Out of this dark journey she returns with an offering to us: an understanding of human nature that enhances our very humanity.
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  26.  59
    The Ethical Primate: Humans, Freedom and Morality.Mary Midgley - 1994 - Routledge.
    In The Ethical Primate , Mary Midgley, 'one of the sharpest critical pens in the West' according to the Times Literary Supplement , addresses the fundamental question of human freedom. Scientists and philosophers have found it difficult to understand how each human-being can be a living part of the natural world and still be free. Midgley explores their responses to this seeming paradox and argues that our evolutionary origin explains both why and how human freedom and morality have (...)
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  27. Wisdom, Information and Wonder: What is Knowledge For?Mary Midgley - 2002 - Routledge.
    In this book one of Britain's leading philosophers tackles a question at the root of our civilisation: What is knowledge for? Midgley rejects the fragmentary and specialized way in which information is conveyed in the high-tech world, and criticizes conceptions of philosophy that support this mode of thinking.
     
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  28. The Solitary Self: Darwin and the Selfish Gene.Mary Midgley - 2010 - Routledge.
    Renowned philosopher Mary Midgley explores the nature of our moral constitution to challenge the view that reduces human motivation to self-interest. Midgley argues cogently and convincingly that simple, one-sided accounts of human motives, such as the 'selfish gene' tendency in recent neo-Darwinian thought, may be illuminating but are always unrealistic. Such neatness, she shows, cannot be imposed on human psychology. She returns to Darwin's original writings to show how the reductive individualism which is now presented as Darwinism does (...)
     
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  29. The Solitary Self: Darwin and the Selfish Gene.Mary Midgley - 2010 - Routledge.
    Renowned philosopher Mary Midgley explores the nature of our moral constitution to challenge the view that reduces human motivation to self-interest. Midgley argues cogently and convincingly that simple, one-sided accounts of human motives, such as the 'selfish gene' tendency in recent neo-Darwinian thought, may be illuminating but are always unrealistic. Such neatness, she shows, cannot be imposed on human psychology. She returns to Darwin's original writings to show how the reductive individualism which is now presented as Darwinism does (...)
     
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  30. Utopias, Dolphins and Computers: Problems in Philosophical Plumbing.Mary Midgley - 1996 - Routledge.
    Why do the big philosophical questions so often strike us as far-fetched and little to with everyday life? Mary Midgley shows that it need not be that way; she shows that there is a need for philosophy in the real world. Her popularity as one of our foremost philosophers is based on a no-nonsense, down-to-earth approach to fundamental human problems, philosphical or otherwise. In _Utopias, Dolphins and Computers_ she makes her case for philosophy as a difficult but necessary tool (...)
     
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  31.  47
    Dover Beach Revisited.Mary Midgley - 2006 - Think 4 (12):69-74.
    Mary Midgley asks, ‘What do we mean when we say that things are real or illusory?’.
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  32. Wickedness.Dr Mary Midgley & Mary Midgley - 2001 - Routledge.
    To look into the darkness of the human soul is a frightening venture. Here Mary Midgley does so, with her customary brilliance and clarity. In _Wickedness_ she sets out to delineate not so much the nature of wickedness as its actual _sources_. Midgley's analysis proves that the capacity for real wickedness is an inevitable part of human nature. This is not however a blanket acceptance of evil. She provides us with a framework that accepts its existence yet offers (...)
     
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  33.  34
    How Real Are You?Mary Midgley - 2002 - Think 1 (2):35-46.
    Has science shown that people are, in some sense, an illusion? According to Mary Midgley, that is precisely what some scientists now preach. Focusing particularly on a claim made by Richard Dawkins, she explains why she believes these scientists are making a serious mistake.
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  34.  50
    Utopias, Dolphins, and Computers: Problems in Philosophical Plumbing.Mary Midgley - 1996 - Routledge.
    In Utopias, Dolphins and Computers Mary Midgley brings philosophy into the real world by using it to consider environmental, educational and gender issues. From "Freedom, Feminism and War" to "Artificial Intelligence and Creativity," this book searches for what is distorting our judgement and helps us to see more clearly the dramas which are unfolding in the world around us. Utopias, Dolphins and Computers aims to counter today's anti-intellectualism, not to mention philosophy's twentieth-century view of itself as futile. Mary (...) explains the point of philosophy: how to do it, why it is needed, what difficulties confront it and what topics need its attention. (shrink)
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  35. The Ethical Primate: Humans, Freedom and Morality.Mary Midgley - 1994 - Routledge.
    In _The Ethical Primate_, Mary Midgley, 'one of the sharpest critical pens in the West' according to the _Times Literary Supplement_, addresses the fundamental question of human freedom. Scientists and philosophers have found it difficult to understand how each human-being can be a living part of the natural world and still be free. Midgley explores their responses to this seeming paradox and argues that our evolutionary origin explains both why and how human freedom and morality have come about.
     
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  36. Evolution as a Religion: Strange Hopes and Stranger Fears.Mary Midgley - 1985 - Routledge.
    According to a profile in _The Guardian_, Mary Midgley is 'the foremost scourge of scientific pretensions in this country; someone whose wit is admired even by those who feel she sometimes oversteps the mark'. Considered one of Britain's finest philosophers, Midgley exposes the illogical logic of poor doctrines that shelter themselves behind the prestige of science. Always at home when taking on the high priests of evolutionary theory - Dawkins, Wilson and their acolytes - she has famously described (...)
     
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  37. Are You an Illusion?Mary Midgley - 2014 - Routledge.
    In _Are You an Illusion?_ today’s scientific orthodoxy, which treats the self as nothing more than an elaborate illusion, comes under spirited attack. In an impassioned defence of the importance of our own thoughts, feelings and experiences, Mary Midgley shows that there’s much more to our selves than a jumble of brain cells. Exploring the remarkable gap that has opened up between our understanding of our own sense of self and today’s science, she exposes some very odd claims and (...)
     
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  38. Owl of Minerva: A Memoir.Mary Midgley - 2005 - Routledge.
    One of the UK’s foremost living moral philosophers, Mary Midgley recounts her remarkable story in this elegiac and moving account of friendships found and lost, bitter philosophical battles and of a profound love of teaching. In spite of her many books and public profile, little is known about Mary’s life. Part of a famous generation of women philosophers that includes Elizabeth Anscombe, Philippa Foot, Mary Warnock and Iris Murdoch, Midgley tells us in vivid and humorous fashion how they (...)
     
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  39. Reading Anna Freud.Nick Midgley - 2012 - Routledge.
    _What place do Anna Freud’s ideas have in the history of psychoanalysis? What can her writings teach us today about how to work therapeutically with children? Are her psychoanalytic ideas still relevant to those entrusted with the welfare of infants and young people? _ _Reading Anna Freud_ provides an accessible introduction to the writings of one of the most significant figures in the history of psychoanalysis. Each chapter introduces a number of her key papers, with clear summaries of the main (...)
     
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  40. The Solitary Self: Darwin and the Selfish Gene.Mary Midgley - 2010 - Routledge.
    Renowned philosopher Mary Midgley explores the nature of our moral constitution to challenge the view that reduces human motivation to self-interest. Midgley argues cogently and convincingly that simple, one-sided accounts of human motives, such as the 'selfish gene' tendency in recent neo-Darwinian thought, may be illuminating but are always unrealistic. Such neatness, she shows, cannot be imposed on human psychology. She returns to Darwin's original writings to show how the reductive individualism which is now presented as Darwinism does (...)
     
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  41. Wisdom, Information and Wonder: What is Knowledge For?Mary Midgley - 2016 - Routledge.
    In this book one of Britain's leading philosophers tackles a question at the root of our civilisation: What is knowledge for? Midgley rejects the fragmentary and specialized way in which information is conveyed in the high-tech world, and criticizes conceptions of philosophy that support this mode of thinking.
     
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  42.  91
    Animals and Why They Matter.Mary Midgley - 1983 - University of Georgia Press.
    Whether considering vegetarianism, women's rights, or the "humanity" of pets, this book goes to the heart of the question of why all animals matter.
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  43. Philosophical Plumbing.Mary Midgley - 1992 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 33:139-151.
    Is philosophy like plumbing? I have made this comparison a number of times when I have wanted to stress that philosophising is not just grand and elegant and difficult, but is also needed. It is not optional. The idea has caused mild surprise, and has sometimes been thought rather undignified. The question of dignity is a very interesting one, and I shall come back to it at the end of this article. But first, I would like to work the comparison (...)
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  44. Biotechnology and Monstrosity: Why We Should Pay Attention to the "Yuk Factor".Mary Midgley - 2000 - Hastings Center Report 30 (5):7-15.
    We find our way in the world partly by means of the discriminatory power of our emotions. The gut sense that something is repugnant or unsavory—the sort of feeling that many now have about various forms of biotechnology—sometimes turns out to be rooted in articulable and legitimate objections, which with time can be spelled out, weighed, and either endorsed or dismissed. But we ought not dismiss the emotional response at the outset as “mere feeling.”.
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  45. Gene-Juggling.Mary Midgley - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (210):439.
    Genes cannot be selfish or unselfish, any more than atoms can be jealous, elephants abstract or biscuits teleological. This should not need mentioning, but Richard Dawkins's book The Selfish Gene has succeeded in confusing a number of people about it, including Mr J. L. Mackie. What Mackie welcomes in Dawkins is a new, biological-looking kind of support for philosophic egoism. If this support came from Dawkins's producing important new facts, or good new interpretations of old facts, about animal life, this (...)
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  46.  34
    Can't We Make Moral Judgements?Mary Midgley - 1991 - St. Martin's Press.
  47.  29
    Wickedness: A Philosophical Essay.Mary Midgley - 1984 - Routledge & Kegan Paul.
  48.  41
    Why The Idea Of Purpose Won't Go Away.Mary Midgley - 2011 - Philosophy 86 (4):545-561.
    Biologists' current habit of explaining each feature of human life separately through its evolutionary function — its assumed tendency to enhance each individual's reproductive prospects — is unworkable. It also sits oddly with these scientists' official rejection of teleology, since it treats all life as a process which does have an aim, namely, to perpetuate itself. But that aim is empty because it is circular. If we want to understand the behaviour of living things (including humans) we have to treat (...)
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  49.  85
    The End of Anthropocentrism?Mary Midgley - 1994 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 36:103-112.
    Are human beings in some sense central to the cosmos? It used to seem obvious that they were. It seems less obvious now. But the idea is still powerful in our thinking, and it may be worth while asking just what it has meant.
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  50. Skimpole Unmasked.Mary Midgley - 1997 - History of the Human Sciences 10 (4):92-96.
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