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R. M. Cook [338]Roy T. Cook [69]Roy Cook [15]Richard Cook [11]
Rebecca J. Cook [10]R. Cook [8]Robert Manuel Cook [8]Robert Francis Cook [7]

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Roy T. Cook
University of Minnesota
Rose Cook
Victoria University of Wellington
Ryan Cook
California State University, Northridge
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  1.  18
    Mirror Neurons: From Origin to Function.Richard Cook, Geoffrey Bird, Caroline Catmur, Clare Press & Cecilia Heyes - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (2):177-192.
  2. Let a Thousand Flowers Bloom: A Tour of Logical Pluralism.Roy T. Cook - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (6):492-504.
    Logical pluralism is the view that there is more than one correct logic. In this article, I explore what logical pluralism is, and what it entails, by: (i) distinguishing clearly between relativism about a particular domain and pluralism about that domain; (ii) distinguishing between a number of forms logical pluralism might take; (iii) attempting to distinguish between those versions of pluralism that are clearly true and those that are might be controversial; and (iv) surveying three prominent attempts to argue for (...)
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  3.  38
    The Yablo Paradox: An Essay on Circularity.Roy T. Cook - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Roy T Cook examines the Yablo paradox--a paradoxical, infinite sequence of sentences, each of which entails the falsity of all others that follow it. He focuses on questions of characterization, circularity, and generalizability, and pays special attention to the idea that it provides us with a semantic paradox that involves no circularity.
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  4.  33
    When Distraction Helps: Evidence That Concurrent Articulation and Irrelevant Speech Can Facilitate Insight Problem Solving.Linden J. Ball, John E. Marsh, Damien Litchfield, Rebecca L. Cook & Natalie Booth - 2015 - Thinking and Reasoning 21 (1):76-96.
    We report an experiment investigating the “special-process” theory of insight problem solving, which claims that insight arises from non-conscious, non-reportable processes that enable problem re-structuring. We predicted that reducing opportunities for speech-based processing during insight problem solving should permit special processes to function more effectively and gain conscious awareness, thereby facilitating insight. We distracted speech-based processing by using either articulatory suppression or irrelevant speech, with findings for these conditions supporting the predicted insight facilitation effect relative to silent working or thinking (...)
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  5.  60
    Cardinality and Acceptable Abstraction.Roy T. Cook & Øystein Linnebo - 2018 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 59 (1):61-74.
    It is widely thought that the acceptability of an abstraction principle is a feature of the cardinalities at which it is satisfiable. This view is called into question by a recent observation by Richard Heck. We show that a fix proposed by Heck fails but we analyze the interesting idea on which it is based, namely that an acceptable abstraction has to “generate” the objects that it requires. We also correct and complete the classification of proposed criteria for acceptable abstraction.
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  6. Same-Different Concept Formation in Pigeons.Robert G. Cook - 2002 - In Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen & Gordon M. Burghardt (eds.), The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition. MIT Press. pp. 229--237.
     
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  7.  99
    There is No Paradox of Logical Validity.Roy T. Cook - 2014 - Logica Universalis 8 (3-4):447-467.
    A number of authors have argued that Peano Arithmetic supplemented with a logical validity predicate is inconsistent in much the same manner as is PA supplemented with an unrestricted truth predicate. In this paper I show that, on the contrary, there is no genuine paradox of logical validity—a completely general logical validity predicate can be coherently added to PA, and the resulting system is consistent. In addition, this observation lead to a number of novel, and important, insights into the nature (...)
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  8. Patterns of Paradox.Roy T. Cook - 2004 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 69 (3):767-774.
  9.  35
    Logic: A Very Short Introduction. [REVIEW]Roy Cook - 2019 - History and Philosophy of Logic 40 (2):204-205.
    Volume 40, Issue 2, May 2019, Page 204-205.
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  10. Abstraction and Identity.Roy T. Cook & Philip A. Ebert - 2005 - Dialectica 59 (2):121–139.
    A co-authored article with Roy T. Cook forthcoming in a special edition on the Caesar Problem of the journal Dialectica. We argue against the appeal to equivalence classes in resolving the Caesar Problem.
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  11.  51
    Conservativeness, Stability, and Abstraction.R. T. Cook - 2012 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 63 (3):673-696.
    One of the main problems plaguing neo-logicism is the Bad Company challenge: the need for a well-motivated account of which abstraction principles provide legitimate definitions of mathematical concepts. In this article a solution to the Bad Company challenge is provided, based on the idea that definitions ought to be conservative. Although the standard formulation of conservativeness is not sufficient for acceptability, since there are conservative but pairwise incompatible abstraction principles, a stronger conservativeness condition is sufficient: that the class of acceptable (...)
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  12.  50
    Abstraction and Four Kinds of Invariance.Roy T. Cook - 2017 - Philosophia Mathematica 25 (1):3–25.
    Fine and Antonelli introduce two generalizations of permutation invariance — internal invariance and simple/double invariance respectively. After sketching reasons why a solution to the Bad Company problem might require that abstraction principles be invariant in one or both senses, I identify the most fine-grained abstraction principle that is invariant in each sense. Hume’s Principle is the most fine-grained abstraction principle invariant in both senses. I conclude by suggesting that this partially explains the success of Hume’s Principle, and the comparative lack (...)
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  13.  97
    There Are Non-Circular Paradoxes (but Yablo's Isn't One of Them!).Roy T. Cook - 2006 - The Monist 89 (1):118-149.
  14. The T-Schema is Not a Logical Truth.R. T. Cook - 2012 - Analysis 72 (2):231-239.
    It is shown that the logical truth of instances of the T-schema is incompatible with the formal nature of logical truth. In particular, since the formality of logical truth entails that the set of logical truths is closed under substitution, the logical truth of T-schema instances entails that all sentences are logical truths.
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  15.  25
    Iteration One More Time.R. Cook - 2003 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 44 (2):63--92.
    A neologicist set theory based on an abstraction principle (NewerV) codifying the iterative conception of set is investigated, and its strength is compared to Boolos's NewV. The new principle, unlike NewV, fails to imply the axiom of replacement, but does secure powerset. Like NewV, however, it also fails to entail the axiom of infinity. A set theory based on the conjunction of these two principles is then examined. It turns out that this set theory, supplemented by a principle stating that (...)
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  16.  80
    Philosophy of Mathematics: An Introduction to the World of Proofs and Pictures.Roy T. Cook - 2004 - Mind 113 (449):154-157.
  17. What is a Truth Value And How Many Are There?Roy T. Cook - 2009 - Studia Logica 92 (2):183-201.
    Truth values are, properly understood, merely proxies for the various relations that can hold between language and the world. Once truth values are understood in this way, consideration of the Liar paradox and the revenge problem shows that our language is indefinitely extensible, as is the class of truth values that statements of our language can take – in short, there is a proper class of such truth values. As a result, important and unexpected connections emerge between the semantic paradoxes (...)
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  18. Vagueness and Mathematical Precision.Roy T. Cook - 2002 - Mind 111 (442):225-247.
    One of the main reasons for providing formal semantics for languages is that the mathematical precision afforded by such semantics allows us to study and manipulate the formalization much more easily than if we were to study the relevant natural languages directly. Michael Tye and R. M. Sainsbury have argued that traditional set-theoretic semantics for vague languages are all but useless, however, since this mathematical precision eliminates the very phenomenon (vagueness) that we are trying to capture. Here we meet this (...)
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  19. What’s Wrong with Tonk.Roy T. Cook - 2005 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 34 (2):217 - 226.
    In “The Runabout Inference Ticket” AN Prior (1960) examines the idea that logical connectives can be given a meaning solely in virtue of the stipulation of a set of rules governing them, and thus that logical truth/consequence.
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  20.  75
    Possible Predicates and Actual Properties.Roy T. Cook - 2019 - Synthese 196 (7):2555-2582.
    In “Properties and the Interpretation of Second-Order Logic” Bob Hale develops and defends a deflationary conception of properties where a property with particular satisfaction conditions actually exists if and only if it is possible that a predicate with those same satisfaction conditions exists. He argues further that, since our languages are finitary, there are at most countably infinitely many properties and, as a result, the account fails to underwrite the standard semantics for second-order logic. Here a more lenient version of (...)
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  21.  5
    There Are Non-Circular Paradoxes.Roy T. Cook - 2006 - The Monist 89 (1):118-149.
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  22. Embracing Revenge: On the Indefinite Extendibility of Language.Roy T. Cook - 2007 - In J. C. Beall (ed.), Revenge of the Liar: New Essays on the Paradox. Oxford University Press. pp. 31.
     
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  23. The Foundations of Mathematics in the Theory of Sets.Roy T. Cook - 2003 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (2):347-352.
  24.  30
    Necessity, Necessitism, and Numbers.Roy T. Cook - 2016 - Philosophical Forum 47 (3-4):385-414.
    Timothy Williamson’s Modal Logic as Metaphysics is a book-length defense of necessitism about objects—roughly put, the view that, necessarily, any object that exists, exists necessarily. In more formal terms, Williamson argues for the validity of necessitism for objects (NO: ◻︎∀x◻︎∃y(x=y)). NO entails both the (first-order) Barcan formula (BF: ◇∃xΦ → ∃x◇Φ, for any formula Φ) and the (first-order) converse Barcan formula (CBF: ∃x◇Φ → ◇∃xΦ, for any formula Φ). The purpose of this essay is not to assess Williamson’s arguments either (...)
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  25. Knights, Knaves and Unknowable Truths.Roy T. Cook - 2006 - Analysis 66 (1):10-16.
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  26.  87
    Alethic Pluralism, Generic Truth, and Mixed Conjunctions.Roy T. Cook - 2011 - Philosophical Quarterly 61 (244):624-629.
    A difficulty for alethic pluralism has been the idea that semantic evaluation of conjunctions whose conjuncts come from discourses with distinct truth properties requires a third notion of truth which applies to both of the original discourses. But this line of reasoning does not entail that there exists a single generic truth property that applies to all statements and all discourses, unless it is supplemented with additional, controversial, premises. So the problem of mixed conjunctions, while highlighting other aspects of alethic (...)
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  27. Paradoxes.Roy T. Cook - 2013 - Polity.
    Paradoxes are arguments that lead from apparently true premises, via apparently uncontroversial reasoning, to a false or even contradictory conclusion. Paradoxes threaten our basic understanding of central concepts such as space, time, motion, infinity, truth, knowledge, and belief. In this volume Roy T Cook provides a sophisticated, yet accessible and entertaining, introduction to the study of paradoxes, one that includes a detailed examination of a wide variety of paradoxes. The book is organized around four important types of paradox: the semantic (...)
     
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  28. Impure Sets Are Not Located: A Fregean Argument.Roy T. Cook - 2012 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 1 (3):219-229.
    It is sometimes suggested that impure sets are spatially co-located with their members (and hence are located in space). Sets, however, are in important respects like numbers. In particular, sets are connected to concepts in much the same manner as numbers are connected to concepts—in both cases, they are fundamentally abstracts of (or corresponding to) concepts. This parallel between the structure of sets and the structure of numbers suggests that the metaphysics of sets and the metaphysics of numbers should parallel (...)
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  29. New Waves on an Old Beach: Fregean Philosophy of Mathematics Today.Roy T. Cook - 2009 - In Ø. Linnebo O. Bueno (ed.), New Waves in Philosophy of Mathematics.
     
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  30.  34
    Embracing the Technicalities: Expressive Completeness and Revenge.Nicholas Tourville & Roy T. Cook - 2016 - Review of Symbolic Logic 9 (2):325-358.
    The Revenge Problem threatens every approach to the semantic paradoxes that proceeds by introducing nonclassical semantic values. Given any such collection Δ of additional semantic values, one can construct a Revenge sentence:This sentence is either false or has a value in Δ.TheEmbracing Revengeview, developed independently by Roy T. Cook and Phlippe Schlenker, addresses this problem by suggesting that the class of nonclassical semantic values is indefinitely extensible, with each successive Revenge sentence introducing a new ‘pathological’ semantic value into the discourse. (...)
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  31.  53
    G. Roger Edwards: Corinth VII.3: Corinthian Hellenistic Pottery. Pp. Xviii + 254; 86 Plates. Princeton, N.J.: American School of Classical Studies, 1975. Cloth, $35. [REVIEW]R. M. Cook - 1977 - The Classical Review 27 (2):306-306.
  32. Counterintuitive Consequences of the Revision Theory of Truth.Roy Cook - 2002 - Analysis 62 (1):16–22.
  33.  88
    The State of the Economy: Neo-Logicism and Inflationt.Roy T. Cook - 2002 - Philosophia Mathematica 10 (1):43-66.
    In this paper I examine the prospects for a successful neo–logicist reconstruction of the real numbers, focusing on Bob Hale's use of a cut-abstraction principle. There is a serious problem plaguing Hale's project. Natural generalizations of this principle imply that there are far more objects than one would expect from a position that stresses its epistemological conservativeness. In other words, the sort of abstraction needed to obtain a theory of the reals is rampantly inflationary. I also indicate briefly why this (...)
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  34.  47
    Ann Harnwell Ashmead and Kyle Meredith Phillips: Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum: The Ella Riegel Memorial Museum, Bryn Mawr College, Fasc. I. Pp. Xiv+64; 42 Plates. Princeton, N.J.: University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1971. Portfolio, £8. [REVIEW]R. M. Cook - 1973 - The Classical Review 23 (2):289-289.
  35.  6
    The Principles of Mathematics Revisited.R. Cook - 1998 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (2):309-316.
  36.  42
    Ernst Kirsten, Wilhelm Kraiker: Griechenlandkunde: ein Führer zu klassischen Stätten. Vierte Auflage. Pp. xii + 884; 193 figs., 2 maps. Heidelberg: Winter, 1962. Cloth, DM. 36. [REVIEW]R. M. Cook - 1965 - The Classical Review 15 (1):131-131.
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  37. What Negation is Not: Intuitionism and ‘0=1’.Roy T. Cook & Jon Cogburn - 2000 - Analysis 60 (1):5–12.
  38. Kit Fine, The Limits of Abstraction Oxford, Clarendon Press, 2002, Cloth 18.99/US $25.00 ISBN: 0-19-924618-1. [REVIEW]R. T. Cook - 2004 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (4):791-800.
    Critical Notice of The Limits of abstraction by Kit Fine, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2002, pp.216. ISBN 9780191567261.
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  39.  41
    Opuscula Atheniensia, viii. (Skr. utg. av Svenska Institutet i Athen, 4°, xiv.) Pp. 217; 82 figs. Lund: Gleerup, 1968. Paper, Kr. 100.R. M. Cook - 1970 - The Classical Review 20 (1):109-109.
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  40.  34
    Intuitionism Reconsidered.Roy Cook - 2005 - In Stewart Shapiro (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Mathematics and Logic. Oxford University Press. pp. 387--411.
    This chapter examines the debate between advocates of classical logic and advocates of intuitionistic logic. It examines the semantic and epistemic issues on which this debate is usually conducted. After introducing the idea that logic is a model of correct reasoning, the chapter explores the viability of a logic intermediate between classical and intuitionistic.
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  41.  41
    A. D. Trendall: Greek Vases in the Logie Collection. Pp. 83; 40 Plates. Christchurch, N.Z.: University Canterbury, 1971. Stiff Paper. [REVIEW]R. M. Cook - 1973 - The Classical Review 23 (2):290-290.
  42.  4
    Why Are Social Interactions Found Quickly in Visual Search Tasks?Tim Vestner, Katie L. H. Gray & Richard Cook - 2020 - Cognition 200:104270.
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  43.  39
    Roland Hampe, Adam Winter: Bei Töpfern und Zieglern in Süditalien, Sizilien und Griechenland. Pp. xii+274; 64 plates, 150 figs. Mainz: Römisch Germanisches Zentralmuseum, 1965. Cloth, DM. 46. [REVIEW]R. M. Cook - 1966 - The Classical Review 16 (3):420-420.
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  44. Discrimination Revised: Reviewing the Relationship Between Social Groups, Disparate Treatment, and Disparate Impact.Ryan Cook - 2015 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 2 (2):219-244.
    It is usually accepted that whether or not indirect discrimination is a form of immoral discrimination, it appears to be structurally different from direct discrimination. First, it seems that either one involves the agent focusing on different things while making a decision. Second, it seems that the victim’s group membership is relevant to the outcomes of either sort of action in different ways. In virtue of these two facts, it is usually concluded that indirect discrimination is structurally different from direct (...)
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  45.  39
    J. D. Beazley: Paralipomena: Additions to ‘Attic Black-Figure Vase-Painters’ and ‘Attic Red-Figure Vase-Painters’ . Pp. Xix+679. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1971. Cloth, £9. [REVIEW]R. M. Cook - 1973 - The Classical Review 23 (2):289-289.
  46. Hume’s Big Brother: Counting Concepts and the Bad Company Objection.Roy T. Cook - 2009 - Synthese 170 (3):349 - 369.
    A number of formal constraints on acceptable abstraction principles have been proposed, including conservativeness and irenicity. Hume’s Principle, of course, satisfies these constraints. Here, variants of Hume’s Principle that allow us to count concepts instead of objects are examined. It is argued that, prima facie, these principles ought to be no more problematic than HP itself. But, as is shown here, these principles only enjoy the formal properties that have been suggested as indicative of acceptability if certain constraints on the (...)
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  47.  38
    Athenian Black-Figure Vases John Boardman: Athenian Black Figure Vases: A Handbook. Pp. 252; 383 Figs. London: Thames & Hudson, 1974. Cloth, £2·50 (Paper, £1·50). [REVIEW]R. M. Cook - 1976 - The Classical Review 26 (2):253-253.
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  48. A Dictionary of Philosophical Logic.Roy T. Cook - 2009 - Edinburgh University Press.
     
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  49.  82
    Should Anti-Realists Be Anti-Realists About Anti-Realism?Roy T. Cook - 2014 - Erkenntnis 79 (S2):233-258.
    On the Dummettian understanding, anti-realism regarding a particular discourse amounts to (or at the very least, involves) a refusal to accept the determinacy of the subject matter of that discourse and a corresponding refusal to assert at least some instances of excluded middle (which can be understood as expressing this determinacy of subject matter). In short: one is an anti-realist about a discourse if and only if one accepts intuitionistic logic as correct for that discourse. On careful examination, the strongest (...)
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  50.  37
    Sp. Marinatos: Life and Art in Prehistoric Thera. Pp. 21; 8 Plates. London: Oxford University Press, 1972. Stiff Paper, 50p. [REVIEW]R. M. Cook - 1974 - The Classical Review 24 (2):308-308.
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