Results for 'ethics of social consequences'

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  1. Ethics of Social Consequences: Philosophical, Applied and Professional Challenges.Vasil Gluchman (ed.) - 2018 - Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
    The edited volume presents new and unconventional views of many traditional moral values, such as humanity, human dignity, moral right (of life), justice and responsibility. The originality of the contributions contained in this book is to analyze these values and approaches from the point of view of non-utilitarian consequentialism and ethics of social consequences as one of its forms. The authors of the chapters present new ways of solving many of the contemporary ethical and moral issues, for (...)
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  2.  5
    Ethics of Social Consequences as a Hybrid Form of Ethical Theory?Ján Kalajtzidis - 2019 - Philosophia 47 (3):705-722.
    The contemporary situation within the realm of ethical theories is quite complicated. Were it not enough that many classical ethical theories are evolving into the new modern forms, new types of ethical theories are arising, as well. The main aim of the paper is to introduce this issue of ethical theories which are known under the term hybrid ethical theories. A secondary aim of the paper is to describe and characterize the contemporary ethical theory of ethics of social (...)
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  3.  23
    Spinozian Consequentialism of Ethics of Social Consequences.Michaela Petrufová Joppová - 2018 - Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe) 8 (1-2):41-50.
    The present article deals with specific normative concepts of Spinoza’s ethical system and compares them to certain aspects of the theory of ethics of social consequences. At first, a way to approach the problem of normativity in Spinoza is presented, concentrating on the obligatory character of rational - or intellectual - motives. Then, theoretical evidence is presented which links Spinoza to normative-ethical consequentialism. The basis for a consequentialist model of Spinoza’s ethics is the concept of perfection, (...)
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  4. G. E. Moore and Theory of Moral/Right Action in Ethics of Social Consequences.Vasil Gluchman - 2017 - Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe) 7 (1-2):57-65.
    G. E. Moore’s critical analysis of right action in utilitarian ethics and his consequentialist concept of right action is a starting point for a theory of moral/right action in ethics of social consequences. The terms right and wrong have different meanings in these theories. The author explores different aspects of right and wrong actions in ethics of social consequences and compares them with Moore’s ideas. He positively evaluates Moore’s contributions to the development his (...)
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  5. Ethics of Social Consequences as a Contemporary Consequentialist Theory.Ján Kalajtzidis - 2013 - Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe) 3 (3-4):159-171.
    The main aim of the paper is critical reflection of the ethics of social consequences. The reflection is based on two partially related positions. Ethics of social consequences is, on the one hand, characterized as a contemporary ethical theory and, on the other, as a specific form of consequentialism. Methodology of criticism is based on the works of a homogenous group of modern-day consequentialist authors (though these are of diverse platforms): Pettit, Singer, Sen, Shaw. (...)
     
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  6. Ethics of Social Consequences – Methodology of Bioethics Education.Vasil Gluchman - 2012 - Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe) 2 (1-2):16-27.
    Ethics of social consequences as a form of satisficing non-utilitarian consequentialism can be one of the methodological basis of bioethics education. The primary values in ethics of social consequences are humanity, human dignity and moral rights, which are developed and realized in correlation with positive social consequences. Secondary values in ethics of social consequences include justice, responsibility, moral duty and tolerance. The author analyses human dignity and humanity as principles (...)
     
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  7.  3
    The Challenge of Death and Ethics of Social Consequences: Death of Moral Agency.Ján Kalajtzidis - 2018 - Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe) 8 (3-4):209-218.
    The present paper focuses on the issue of death from the perspective of ethics of social consequences. To begin with, the paper summarizes Peter Singer’s position on the issue of brain death and on organ procurement related to the definition of death. For better understanding of the issue, an example from real life is used. There are at least three prominent sets of views on what it takes to be called dead. All those views are shortly presented (...)
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  8.  5
    Ethics of Social Consequences and Ethical Issues of Consumption.Ján Kalajtzidis - 2017 - Human Affairs 27 (2).
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  9. Human Being and Morality in Ethics of Social Consequences.Vasil Gluchman - 2004 - Filosoficky Casopis 52:504-514.
     
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  10.  3
    Critical Review of Theory and Practice in Ethics of Social Consequences.Lukáš Švaňa - 2018 - Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe) 8 (1-2):139-147.
    The article deals with ethics of social consequences as a modern ethical theory and proposes some critical remarks based on various elaborations of the theory presented in the newly published edited volume Ethics of social consequences: Philosophical, applied and professional challenges. It confronts and challenges several of the presented concepts and ideas and tries to find a solution for the theory to become even more elaborated but still remain within the boundaries of its ontological (...)
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  11.  1
    Euthanasia as an Issue in Ethics of Social Consequences?Ján Kalajtzidis - 2020 - Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe) 10 (3-4):221-229.
    The main aim of the presented paper is to look for an answer as to whether and how euthanasia reflected is in ethics of social consequences. Ethics of social consequences is a contemporary Slovak ethical theory with an original approach to delimitating moral agency. The paper puts this definition to the test while considering the main focus of the paper – responding to the question of whether euthanasia and end of life can be understood (...)
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  12.  87
    Human Dignity and the Non-Utilitarist Consequentialist Ethics of Social Consequences.V. Gluchman - 2004 - Filozofia 59:502-506.
    Prominent critics of consequentialism hold that utilitarianism is not capable of accepting authentic human values, because the consequentialist viewpoint is impersonal. According to it consequentialist rationality has no axiological limits and it can think about doing the unthinkable. The main objective of the paper is to show that human dignity has a significant position in the author’s conception of ethics of social consequences arguing for a particular theory of the value of human dignity. The author argues that (...)
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  13. The Place of Humanity in the Ethics of Social Consequences.V. Gluchman - 2005 - Filozofia 60 (8):613-623.
    In the author’s view the humanity has its place in the ethics of social consequences : its implementation leads directly to positive social consequences, i.e. the main evaluation criteria in this conception. However, in applying the principle of humanity one has to see humanity as the protection of sustainable life according to the degree, to which an individual human life meets at least minimal qualitative standards of human life. The resulting idea is that a person (...)
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  14.  32
    The theory of the good in the ethics of social consequences.V. Gluchman - 2001 - Filosoficky Casopis 49 (4):633-654.
    The paper explores the theory of right action in ethics of social consequences as a form of non-utilitarian consequentialism.
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  15.  89
    The biological and the social in the ethics of social consequences.Vasil Gluchman - 2003 - Filozofia 58 (2):119-137.
    The paper examines the relationship between the biological and the social in morals. Its conclusion is that the biological is one among other sources of moarls. The social developed as another, much more dynamic source. An important role is played by free will or the moral freedom, especially on the individual morals level. It is the consequences, and especially social consequences, that in the author's viewpoint to the actual state of social and individual morals.
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  16.  44
    Human Dignity and Non-Utilitarian Consequentialist "Ethics of Social Consequences".Vasil Gluchman - 2007 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 1 (7):159-165.
    The main objective of my paper is to show that human dignity has a significant position in my ethics of social consequences (I defend a form of non-utilitarian consequentialism), arguing for a particular theory of the value of human dignity. I argue that my ethics of social consequences is capable of accepting human dignity and all authentic human moral values without exception. I think that my ethical theory of social consequences (as a (...)
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  17.  11
    Human Dignity and Non-Utilitarian Consequentialist "Ethics of Social Consequences".Vasil Gluchman - 2007 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 1:159-165.
    The main objective of my paper is to show that human dignity has a significant position in my ethics of social consequences, arguing for a particular theory of the value of human dignity. I argue that my ethics of social consequences is capable of accepting human dignity and all authentic human moral values without exception. I think that my ethical theory of social consequences can provide the essential missing ingredient identified by the (...)
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  18. Ethics of social consciousness and its principles.V. Gluchman - 1996 - Filozofia 51 (12):821-829.
    The author focuses on the positive social consequences: humanity, justice. rights, responsibility and tolerance. He examines each of these principles and shows. that the ethics of social consequences can be accepted as an alternative way of considering contemporary moral problems as well as of looking for their optimal solutions.
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  19.  61
    The Consequences of Social Responsibility for Small Business Owners in Small Towns.Terry L. Besser - 2012 - Business Ethics 21 (2):129-139.
    This paper focuses on three under-researched subjects in the corporate social responsibility literature: small businesses, small towns, and consequences of social responsibility for the business owner personally. Small businesses are the vast majority of businesses and make a significant contribution to national economic vitality. Their value to the survival of small towns, where they are often the only businesses, is even more important. Research indicates that the social performance of big and small businesses alike is dependent (...)
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  20.  7
    The Consequences of Social Responsibility for Small Business Owners in Small Towns.Terry L. Besser - 2012 - Business Ethics: A European Review 21 (2):129-139.
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  21.  28
    Consequences of Concern: Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Well-Being.Mark D. Promislo, Robert A. Giacalone & Jeremy Welch - 2012 - Business Ethics 21 (2):209-219.
    Prior research has studied the antecedents of beliefs regarding ethics and social responsibility (ESR). However, few studies have examined how individual well-being may be related to such beliefs. In this exploratory study, we assessed the relationship between perceived importance of ESR – both individually and of one's company – and indicators of physical and psychological well-being. Results demonstrated that perceived importance of ESR was associated with three aspects of well-being: exuberance for life, sleep problems, and job stress. The (...)
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  22.  39
    The Social Consequences of Genetic Testing.D. Brahams - 1991 - Journal of Medical Ethics 17 (2):106-107.
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    Consequences of Concern: Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Well-Being.Mark D. Promislo, Robert A. Giacalone & Jeremy Welch - 2012 - Business Ethics: A European Review 21 (2):209-219.
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  24.  69
    College Student Attitudes Toward Advertising's Ethical, Economic, and Social Consequences.Fred K. Beard - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 48 (3):217-228.
    Little research has focused on college students'' attitudes toward advertising''s ethical, economic, and social consequences over the last two decades. Exploring and tracking the attitudes of college students toward advertising is important, however, for several reasons. College students represent an important segment of consumers for many marketers, negative attitudes toward advertising on the part of college students could lead to their support for restrictive regulation in the future, and there are potentially negative consequences concerning the effects of (...)
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  25.  69
    Consumer Perceptions of the Antecedents and Consequences of Corporate Social Responsibility.Andrea J. S. Stanaland, May O. Lwin & Patrick E. Murphy - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):47-55.
    Perceptions of a firm’s stance on corporate social responsibility (CSR) are influenced by its corporate marketing efforts including branding, reputation building, and communications. The current research examines CSR from the consumer’s perspective, focusing on antecedents and consequences of perceived CSR. The findings strongly support the fact that particular cues, namely perceived financial performance and perceived quality of ethics statements, influence perceived CSR which in turn impacts perceptions of corporate reputation, consumer trust, and loyalty. Both consumer trust and (...)
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  26.  51
    Business Ethics and Social Responsibility in Finance Instruction: An Abdication of Responsibility. [REVIEW]Delvin D. Hawley - 1991 - Journal of Business Ethics 10 (9):711 - 721.
    The shareholder wealth maximization objective for corporate management can be a very effective tool for decision making. However, it can also be used to rationalize the commission of unethical or socially irresponsible actions. Overemphasis on the SWM objective by some companies can lead to dangerous or disastrous consequences for consumers, employees, or the general population. Even so, issues of business ethics and social responsibility (BE-SR) are almost totally ignored in corporate finance textbooks. If the typical coverage of (...)
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  27.  5
    The Consequences of Employees’ Perceived Corporate Social Responsibility: A Meta‐Analysis.Yanling Wang, Shan Xu & Yanxia Wang - 2020 - Business Ethics: A European Review 29 (3):471-496.
    Business Ethics: A European Review, EarlyView.
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  28. Some Consequences of Thompson’s Life and Action for Social Philosophy.Italo Testa - 2015 - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche:69-84.
  29. The Ethics of Algorithms: Mapping the Debate.Brent Mittelstadt, Patrick Allo, Mariarosaria Taddeo, Sandra Wachter & Luciano Floridi - 2016 - Big Data and Society 3 (2).
    In information societies, operations, decisions and choices previously left to humans are increasingly delegated to algorithms, which may advise, if not decide, about how data should be interpreted and what actions should be taken as a result. More and more often, algorithms mediate social processes, business transactions, governmental decisions, and how we perceive, understand, and interact among ourselves and with the environment. Gaps between the design and operation of algorithms and our understanding of their ethical implications can have severe (...)
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  30.  33
    Living with the Dragon: Thinking and Acting Ethically in a World of Unintended Consequences.Daryl Koehn - 2010 - Routledge.
    Preliminary definitions and distinctions -- Causes of unintended consequences -- The challenges unintended consequences pose for standard moral frameworks -- Possible ethical remedies.
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  31.  61
    Ganxi's Consequences: Personal Gains at Social Cost. [REVIEW]Ying Fan - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 38 (4):371 - 380.
    Is guanxi ethical? This question is largely ignored in the existing literature. This paper examines the ethical dimension of guanxi by focusing on the consequences of guanxi in business, from ethically misgiving behaviour to outright corruption. Guanxi may bring benefits to individuals as well as the organisations they represent but these benefits are obtained at the expenses of other individuals or firms and thus detrimental to the society. As guanxi has an impact on the wider public other than the (...)
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  32. Marketing’s Consequences: Stakeholder Marketing and Supply Chain Corporate Social Responsibility Issues.C. B. Bhattacharya - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (4):617-641.
    While considerable attention has been given to the harm done to consumers by marketing, less attention has been given to the harm done by consumers as an indirect effect of marketing activities, particularly in regard to supply chains. The recent development of dramatically expanded global supply chains has resulted in social and environmental problems upstream that are attributable at least in part to downstream marketers and consumers. Marketers have responded mainly by using corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication to (...)
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  33.  80
    Social choice ethics in artificial intelligence.Seth D. Baum - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (1):165-176.
    A major approach to the ethics of artificial intelligence is to use social choice, in which the AI is designed to act according to the aggregate views of society. This is found in the AI ethics of “coherent extrapolated volition” and “bottom–up ethics”. This paper shows that the normative basis of AI social choice ethics is weak due to the fact that there is no one single aggregate ethical view of society. Instead, the design (...)
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  34.  4
    Unintended Consequences of Human Research Ethics Committees: Au Revoir Workplace Studies?Greg J. Bamber & Jennifer Sappey - 2007 - Monash Bioethics Review 26 (3):26-36.
    To protect the welfare and rights of participants in research and to facilitate research that will be of benefit, as well as protect them against litigation, universities and research-funding agencies in Australia adopted the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Research Involving Humans.1 In many other countries there are similar statements. However, the ways in which such statements are often implemented by Human Research Ethics Committees 2 are in conflict with an important stream of industrial sociological research. This stream (...)
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  35.  21
    Virtue Ethics and Social Psychology.P. Lunt - 2007 - History and Philosophy of Psychology 7 (1):365-392.
    Virtue ethics has emerged as an alternative to deontological and utilitarian theory in recent moral philosophy. The basic notion of virtue ethics is to reassert the importance of virtuous character in ethical judgement in contrast to the emphasis on principles and consequences. Since questions of virtue have been largely neglected in modern moral theory, there has been a return to Aristotles account of virtue as character. This in turn has been questioned as the basis of virtue (...) and there has been a search for alternative accounts of moral agency. One aspect of this critical reflection on virtue ethics is an engagement with social psychology as a source of criticism of the Aristotelian conception of character and as a more plausible alternative foundation for a theory of moral character with contemporary relevance. This paper aims to introduce this area of moral theory to a psychological audience and reflect on the interpretation of social psychological theory and evidence in criticisms of virtuous character, focusing on the use of Milgrams (1974) experiments on obedience to authority as an argument for situationism. A number of questions emerge concerning the interpretation and use of social psychological theory and evidence in debates within moral philosophy. (shrink)
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  36.  21
    The Ethics of Doing Ethics.Sven Ove Hansson - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):105-120.
    Ethicists have investigated ethical problems in other disciplines, but there has not been much discussion of the ethics of their own activities. Research in ethics has many ethical problems in common with other areas of research, and it also has problems of its own. The researcher’s integrity is more precarious than in most other disciplines, and therefore even stronger procedural checks are needed to protect it. The promotion of some standpoints in ethical issues may be socially harmful, and (...)
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  37. The Influence of Social Interaction on Intuitions of Objectivity and Subjectivity.Fisher Matthew, Knobe Joshua, Strickland Brent & C. Keil Frank - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (4):1119-1134.
    We present experimental evidence that people's modes of social interaction influence their construal of truth. Participants who engaged in cooperative interactions were less inclined to agree that there was an objective truth about that topic than were those who engaged in a competitive interaction. Follow-up experiments ruled out alternative explanations and indicated that the changes in objectivity are explained by argumentative mindsets: When people are in cooperative arguments, they see the truth as more subjective. These findings can help inform (...)
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  38.  13
    The Ethics Ecosystem: Personal Ethics, Network Governance and Regulating Actors Governing the Use of Social Media Research Data.Gabrielle Samuel, Gemma E. Derrick & Thed van Leeuwen - 2019 - Minerva 57 (3):317-343.
    This paper examines the consequences of a culture of “personal ethics” when using new methodologies, such as the use of social media sites as a source of data for research. Using SM research as an example, this paper explores the practices of a number of actors and researchers within the “Ethics Ecosystem” which as a network governs ethically responsible research behaviour. In the case of SM research, the ethical use of this data is currently in dispute, (...)
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  39.  15
    Values as Consequences of Transaction: Commentary on 'Reconciling Homo Economicus and John Dewey's Ethics'.Frank X. Ryan - 2003 - Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (2):245-257.
    Mark White hopes to incorporate John Dewey's appeal to deliberation in preference formation into the neoclassical model of choice. White finds affinities between Dewey and neoclassicism: both reject preordained goals, value consequences above motives, and promote 'scientific ethics.' I claim Dewey's actual theory of value and choice is more radically divergent, and may not simply be integrated with neoclassical model. Specifically, I claim: 1) White's interactional view of agents acting in an environment falls short of Dewey's transactional notion (...)
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  40.  63
    Climate Ethics: Justifying a Positive Social Time Preference.Joseph Heath - forthcoming - New Content is Available for Journal of Moral Philosophy.
    _ Source: _Page Count 28 Recent debates over climate change policy have made it clear that the choice of a social discount rate has enormous consequences for the amount of mitigation that will be recommended. The social discount rate determines how future costs are to be compared to present costs. Philosophers, however, have been almost unanimous in endorsing the view that the only acceptable social rate of time preference is zero, a view that, taken literally, has (...)
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  41. From the Ethics of Technology Towards an Ethics of Knowledge Policy.René von Schomberg - 2007 - AI and Society.
    My analysis takes as its point of departure the controversial assumption that contemporary ethical theories cannot capture adequately the ethical and social challenges of scientific and technological development. This assumption is rooted in the argument that classical ethical theory invariably addresses the issue of ethical responsibility in terms of whether and how intentional actions of individuals can be justified. Scientific and technological developments, however, have produced unintentional consequences and side-consequences. These consequences very often result from collective (...)
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  42.  52
    Foreign Investment and Ethics: How to Contribute to Social Responsibility by Doing Business in Less-Developed Countries. [REVIEW]Roland Bardy, Stephen Drew & Tumenta F. Kennedy - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (3):267-282.
    Do foreign direct investment (FDI) and international business ventures promote positive social and economic development in emerging nations? This question will always prove contentious. First, the impacts differ according to context. Second, the social consequences and spillover effects of knowledge diffusion and technology-sharing may be limited and hard to measure. Third, contributions to enhancing social responsibility and improving living standards in host countries are delayed in effect, causally complex, and also hard to measure. Outcomes often critically (...)
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  43.  51
    The Social Determinants of Health, Care Ethics and Just Health Care.Daniel Engster - 2014 - Contemporary Political Theory 13 (2):149-167.
    Political theorists generally defend the moral importance of health care by appealing to its purported importance in promoting good health and saving lives. Recent research on the social determinants of health demonstrates, however, that health care actually does relatively little to promote good health or save lives in comparison with other social and environmental factors. This article assesses the implications of the social determinants of health literature for existing theories of health care justice, and outlines a new (...)
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  44.  70
    Climate Ethics: Justifying a Positive Social Time Preference.Joseph Heath - 2017 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 14 (4):435-462.
    _ Source: _Page Count 28 Recent debates over climate change policy have made it clear that the choice of a social discount rate has enormous consequences for the amount of mitigation that will be recommended. The social discount rate determines how future costs are to be compared to present costs. Philosophers, however, have been almost unanimous in endorsing the view that the only acceptable social rate of time preference is zero, a view that, taken literally, has (...)
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  45.  59
    Kitcher on the Ethics of Inquiry.Robert Talisse & Scott Aikin - 2007 - Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (4):654-665.
    The thesis that scientific inquiry must operate within moral constraints is familiar and unobjectionable in cases involving immoral treatment of experimental subjects, as in the infamous Tuskegee experiments. However, in Science, Truth, and Democracy1 and related work,2 Philip Kitcher envisions a more controversial set of constraints. Specifically, he argues that inquiry ought not to be pursued in cases where the consequences of its pursuit are likely to affect negatively the lives of individuals who comprise a socially underprivileged group. This (...)
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  46. The Inefficacy Objection to Consequentialism and the Problem with the Expected Consequences Response.Mark Budolfson - 2019 - Philosophical Studies 176 (7):1711-1724.
    Collective action problems lie behind many core issues in ethics and social philosophy—for example, whether an individual is required to vote, whether it is wrong to consume products that are produced in morally objectionable ways, and many others. In these cases, it matters greatly what we together do, but yet a single individual’s ‘non-cooperative’ choice seems to make no difference to the outcome and also seems to involve no violation of anyone’s rights. Here it is argued that—contrary to (...)
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  47. The Ethics of Capital Punishment: A Philosophical Investigation of Evil and its Consequences.Matthew Kramer - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Taking a fresh look at a central controversy in criminal law theory, The Ethics of Capital Punishment presents a rationale for the death penalty grounded in a theory of the nature of evil and the nature of defilement. Original, unsettling, and deeply controversial, it will be an essential reference point for future debates on the subject.
     
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  48.  3
    Reproductive Technologies, Care Crisis and Inter-Generational Relations in North India: Towards a Local Ethics of Care.Paro Mishra - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (1):91-109.
    This paper reflects on the social consequences of biotechnological control of population for values and ethics of care within the family household in rural north India. Based on long-term ethnographic research, it illustrates the manner in which social practices intermingle with reproductive choices and new reproductive technologies, leading to a systematic elimination of female foetuses, and thus, imbalanced sex ratios. This technological fashioning of populations, the paper argues, has far-reaching consequences for the institutions of family, (...)
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  49.  12
    Ethics of Routine: A Critical Analysis of the Concept of ‘Routinisation’ in Prenatal Screening.Adriana Kater-Kuipers, Inez D. de Beaufort, Robert-Jan H. Galjaard & Eline M. Bunnik - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (9):626-631.
    In the debate surrounding the introduction of non-invasive prenatal testing in prenatal screening programmes, the concept of routinisation is often used to refer to concerns and potential negative consequences of the test. A literature analysis shows that routinisation has many different meanings, which can be distinguished in three major versions of the concept. Each of these versions comprises several inter-related fears and concerns regarding prenatal screening and particularly regarding NIPT in three areas: informed choice, freedom to choose and (...) for people with a disability. Three of the strongest arguments raised under the flag of routinisation are assessed for their validity: the threat that NIPT poses to informed choice, the potential increase in uptake of first-trimester prenatal screening and its consequences for social pressure to participate in screening or terminate affected pregnancies, and the negative consequences for disabled people. These routinisation arguments lack empirical or normative ground. However, the results of this analysis do not imply that no attention should be paid to possible problems surrounding the introduction of NIPT. At least two problems remain and should be addressed: there should be an ongoing debate about the requirements of informed choice, particularly related to an expanded scope of prenatal screening. Also, reproductive autonomy can only be achieved when expecting parents’ options are variegated, real and valuable, so that they can continue to choose whether or not to screen or to terminate a pregnancy. (shrink)
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  50.  57
    Thinking About ‘Ethics’ in the Ethics of AI.Pak-Hang Wong & Judith Simon - 2020 - IDEES 48.
    A major international consultancy firm identified ‘AI ethicist’ as an essential position for companies to successfully implement artificial intelligence (AI) at the start of 2019. It declares that AI ethicists are needed to help companies navigate the ethical and social issues raised by the use of AI. Top 5 AI hires companies need to succeed in 2019. The view that AI is beneficial but nonetheless potentially harmful to individuals and society is widely shared by the industry, academia, governments, and (...)
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