Search results for 'Amusement' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Is Amusement & Robert C. Roberts (1988). Understanding Lincoln, Ruth Anna Putnam. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 66 (2).score: 30.0
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  2. Ward E. Jones (2006). The Function and Content of Amusement. South African Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):126-137.score: 15.0
    Once we establish that the fundamental subject matter of the study of humour is a mental state – which I will call finding funny – then it immediately follows that we need to find the content and function of this mental state. The main contender for the content of finding funny is the incongruous (the incongruity thesis ); the main contenders for the function of finding funny are grounded either in its generally being an enjoyable state (the gratification thesis ) (...)
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  3. Robert C. Roberts (1988). Is Amusement an Emotion? American Philosophical Quarterly 25 (July):269-274.score: 15.0
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  4. Aaron Smuts (2009). Do Moral Flaws Enhance Amusement? American Philosophical Quarterly 46 (2):151-163.score: 12.0
    I argue that genuine moral flaws never enhance amusement, but they sometimes detract.I argue against comic immoralism--the position that moral flaws can make attempts at humor more amusing.Two common errors have made immoralism look attractive.First, immoralists have confused outrageous content with genuine moral flaws.Second, immoralists have failed to see that it is not sufficient to show that a morally flawed joke is amusing; they need to show that a joke can be more amusing because of the fact that it (...)
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  5. Joseph T. Palencik (2007). Amusement and the Philosophy of Emotion: A Neuroanatomical Approach. Dialogue 46 (3):419-434.score: 12.0
    Philosophers who discuss the emotions have usually treated amusement as a non-emotional mental state. Two prominent philosophers making this claim are Henri Bergson and John Morreall, who maintain that amusement is too abstract and intellectual to qualify as an emotion. Here, the merit of this claim is assessed. Through recent work in neuroanatomy there is reason to doubt the legitimacy of dichotomies that separate emotion and the intellect. Findings suggest that the neuroanatomical structure of amusement is similar (...)
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  6. Nicholas Reynolds (2009). Family, Inner Life, and the Amusement Industry. Radical Philosophy Review 12 (1/2):1-19.score: 12.0
    I critically engage Max Horkheimer’s “Art and Mass Culture” from Critical Theory. I split Horkheimer’s essay into three parts, which correspond to the three sections of my essay. The first section details the objective historical conditions that have lead up to Horkheimer’s diagnosis. The second section describes the change in consciousness that corresponds to these conditions, and the third section outlines Horkheimer’s critique of Mortimer Adler and art that belongs to “the amusement industry.” I describe the basic elements of (...)
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  7. E. M. Dadlez (2011). Truly Funny: Humor, Irony, and Satire as Moral Criticism. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (1):1-17.score: 9.0
    Comparatively speaking, philosophy has not been especially long-winded in attempting to answer questions about what is funny and why we should think so. There is the standard debate of many centuries’ standing between superiority and incongruity accounts of humor, which for the most part attempt to identify the intentional objects of our amusement.1 There is the more recent debate about humor and morality, about whether jokes themselves may be regarded as immoral or about whether it can in certain circumstances (...)
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  8. Andrew Jordan & Stephanie Patridge (2012). Against the Moralistic Fallacy: A Modest Defense of a Modest Sentimentalism About Humor. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (1):83-94.score: 9.0
    In a series of important papers, Justin D’Arms and Daniel Jacobson argue that all extant neo-sentimentalists are guilty of a conflation error that they call the moralistic fallacy. One commits the moralistic fallacy when one infers from the fact that it would be morally wrong to experience an affective attitude—e.g., it would be wrong to be amused—that the attitude does not fit its object—e.g., that it is not funny. Such inferences, they argue, conflate the appropriateness conditions of attitudinal responses with (...)
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  9. Robert A. Sharpe (1975). Seven Reasons Why Amusement is an Emotion. Journal of Value Inquiry 9 (3):201-203.score: 9.0
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  10. Marike Finlay (1988). Deconstructing Austin's Pragmatics: 'An Idle Tea-Table Amusement' (Russell) or an Epistemological Solution to the Crisis of Representation? Semiotica 68 (1-2):7-32.score: 9.0
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  11. David Anderson & Samson Nashon (2007). Predators of Knowledge Construction: Interpreting Students' Metacognition in an Amusement Park Physics Program. Science Education 91 (2):298-320.score: 9.0
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  12. Jack P. Hailman (1971). Editorial: Idle and Witless Amusement. Bioscience 21 (24):1197-1197.score: 9.0
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  13. Scott H. Hemenover & Ulrich Schimmack (2007). That's Disgusting!…, but Very Amusing: Mixed Feelings of Amusement and Disgust. Cognition and Emotion 21 (5):1102-1113.score: 9.0
  14. W. Jones (2011). Transgressive Comedy and Partiality: Making Sense of Our Amusement at His Girl Friday. In Ward E. Jones & Samantha Vice (eds.), Ethics at the Cinema. Oxford University Press.score: 9.0
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  15. Vicky L. Morrisroe (2013). “Sanguinary Amusement”: E. A. Freeman, the Comparative Method and Victorian Theories of Race. Modern Intellectual History 10 (1):27-56.score: 9.0
    This article seeks to revise the conventional portrait of the historian E. A. Freeman (1823–92) as an arch-racist and confident proponent of Aryan superiority. Focusing on the relatively obscure Comparative Politics (1873), it is argued that, while attitudes towards race were hardening in the later nineteenth century, Freeman combined the insights of the practitioners of the Comparative Method and the Liberal Anglican philosophy of Thomas Arnold to define the Aryan race as a community of culture rather than of blood. Explicitly (...)
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  16. Judy Stove (2007). Instruction with Amusement. Renascence 60 (1):3-16.score: 9.0
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  17. Aaron Smuts (2010). The Ethics of Humor: Can Your Sense of Humor Be Wrong? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (3):333-47.score: 6.0
    I distill three somewhat interrelated approaches to the ethical criticism of humor: (1) attitude-based theories, (2) merited-response theories, and (3) emotional responsibility theories. I direct the brunt of my effort at showing the limitations of the attitudinal endorsement theory by presenting new criticisms of Ronald de Sousa’s position. Then, I turn to assess the strengths of the other two approaches, showing that that their major formulations implicitly require the problematic attitudinal endorsement theory. I argue for an effects-mediated responsibility theory , (...)
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  18. Berys Nigel Gaut (1998). Just Joking: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Humor. Philosophy and Literature 22 (1):51-68.score: 6.0
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  19. Martin Shuster (2013). Humor as an Optics: Bergson and the Ethics of Humor. Hypatia 28 (3):618-632.score: 6.0
    Although the ethics of humor is a relatively new field, it already seems to have achieved a consensus about ethics in general. In this paper, I implicitly (1) question the view of ethics that stands behind many discussions in the ethics of humor; I do this by explicitly (2) focusing on what has been a chief preoccupation in the ethics of humor: the evaluation of humor. Does the immoral content of a joke make it more or less humorous? Specifically, I (...)
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  20. Aaron Smuts (2003). Review of Simon Critchley, On Humour. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 61 (4):414-416.score: 6.0
    The highlight of Simon Critchley's small book On Humor (2002) is the inclusion of seven beautiful prints by Charles Le Brun at the start of each chapter. Le Brun's captivating drawings are zoomorphic studies of the human face, each in relation to a different animal.
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  21. Glenn A. Hartz & Ralph Hunt (1991). Humor: The Beauty and the Beast. American Philosophical Quarterly 28 (4):299 - 309.score: 6.0
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  22. John Austin (1956). A Plea for Excuses. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 57:1--30.score: 3.0
    The subject of this paper, Excuses, is one not to be treated, but only to be introduced, within such limits. It is, or might be, the name of a whole branch, even a ramiculated branch, of philosophy, or at least of one fashion of philosophy. I shall try, therefore, first to state what the subject is, why it is worth studying, and how it may be studied, all this at a regrettably lofty level: and then I shall illustrate, in more (...)
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  23. Eric Funkhouser (2006). The Determinable-Determinate Relation. Noûs 40 (3):548–569.score: 3.0
    The properties colored and red stand in a special relation. Namely, red is a determinate of colored, and colored is determinable relative to red. Many other properties are similarly related. The determination relation is an interesting topic of logical investigation in its own right, and the prominent philosophical inquiries into this relation have, accordingly, operated at a high level of abstraction.1 It is time to return to these investigations, not just as a logical amusement, but for the payoffs such (...)
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  24. Aaron Smuts (2013). The Salacious and the Satirical: In Defense of Symmetric Comic Moralism. Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (4):45-62.score: 3.0
    A common view holds that humor and morality are antithetical: Moral flaws enhance amusement, and moral virtues detract. I reject both of these claims. If we distinguish between merely outrageous jokes and immoral jokes, the problems with the common view become apparent. What we find is that genuine morals flaws tend to inhibit amusement. Further, by looking at satire, we can see that moral virtues sometimes enhance amusement. The position I defend is called symmetric comic moralism. It (...)
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  25. Neera Badhwar Kapur (1991). Why It is Wrong to Be Always Guided by the Best: Consequentialism and Friendship. Ethics 101 (3):483-504.score: 3.0
    I take friendship to be a practical and emotional relationship marked by mutual and (more-or-less) equal goodwill, liking, and pleasure. Friendship can exist between siblings, lovers, parent and adult child, as well as between otherwise unrelated people. Some friendships are valued chiefly for their usefulness. Such friendships are instrumental or means friendships. Other friendships are valued chiefly for their own sakes. Such friendships are noninstrumental or end friendships. In this paper I am concerned only with end friendships, and the challenge (...)
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  26. Robert C. Roberts (1988). Humor and the Virtues. Inquiry 31 (2):127 – 149.score: 3.0
    Five dimensions of amusement are ethically searched: incongruity, perspectivity, dissociation, enjoyment, and freshness. Amusement perceives incongruities and virtues are formally congruities between one's character and one's nature. An ethical sense of humor is a sense for incongruities between people's behavior and character, and their telos. To appreciate any humor one must adopt a perspective, and in the case of ethical amusement this is the standpoint of one who possesses the virtues. In being amused at the incongruity of (...)
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  27. Graham Harman (2011). The Road to Objects. Continent 3 (1):171-179.score: 3.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 171-179. Since 2007 there has been a great deal of interest in speculative realism, launched in the spring of that year at a well-attended workshop in London. It was always a loose arrangement of people who shared few explicit doctrines and no intellectual heroes except the horror writer H.P. Lovecraft, an improbable patron saint for a school of metaphysics. Lovecraft serves as a sort of mascot for the “speculative” part of speculative realism, since his grotesque semi-Euclidean monsters (...)
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  28. Victor Nell (2006). Cruelty's Rewards: The Gratifications of Perpetrators and Spectators. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):211-224.score: 3.0
    Cruelty is the deliberate infliction of physical or psychological pain on other living creatures, sometimes indifferently, but often with delight. Though cruelty is an overwhelming presence in the world, there is no neurobiological or psychological explanation for its ubiquity and reward value. This target article attempts to provide such explanations by describing three stages in the development of cruelty. Stage 1 is the development of the predatory adaptation from the Palaeozoic to the ethology of predation in canids, felids, and primates. (...)
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  29. Bart du Laing & Andreas de Block (2010). Amusing Ourselves to Death? Superstimuli and the Evolutionary Social Sciences. Philosophical Psychology 23 (6):821-843.score: 3.0
    Some evolutionary psychologists claim that humans are good at creating superstimuli, and that many pleasure technologies are detrimental to our reproductive fitness. Most of the evolutionary psychological literature makes use of some version of Lorenz and Tinbergen’s largely embryonic conceptual framework to make sense of supernormal stimulation and bias exploitation in humans. However, the early ethological concept “superstimulus” was intimately connected to other erstwhile core ethological notions, such as the innate releasing mechanism, sign stimuli and the fixed action pattern, notions (...)
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  30. Paul Thagard & Cameron Shelley, Emotional Analogies and Analogical Inference.score: 3.0
    Despite the growing appreciation of the relevance of affect to cognition, analogy researchers have paid remarkably little attention to emotion. This paper discusses three general classes of analogy that involve emotions. The most straightforward are analogies and metaphors about emotions, for example "Love is a rose and you better not pick it." Much more interesting are analogies that involve the transfer of emotions, for example in empathy in which people understand the emotions of others by imagining their own emotional reactions (...)
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  31. Karl Pfeifer (1997). Laughter, Freshness, and Titillation. Inquiry 40 (3):307 – 322.score: 3.0
    Robert C. Roberts's suggestion that the conditions for laughter at humor (e.g. jokes) can best be captured with a notion of freshness, as opposed to surprise, is pursued. The relationship freshness has to setup and surprise is clarified, and the place of freshness within a larger system of structuring metaphors is alluded to. The question of whether freshness can also cover laughter at the nonhumorous (e.g. tickling) is then taken up, it being determined that such coverage is possible but uneven. (...)
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  32. Lawrence Lengbeyer (2005). Humor, Context, and Divided Cognition. Social Theory and Practice 31 (3):309-36.score: 3.0
    Those who suggest that only a sexist (or racist, or anti-semite) can experience amusement at a sexist (or racist, or anti-semitic) joke have failed to grasp two underappreciated features of the psychology of humor: (1) that amusement is sensitive to what is conveyed to the audience by the contexts within which a joke is taken to be situated, and hence to pragmatic, and not merely semantic, factors; and (2) that, given the non-integrated nature of the ordinary human cognitive (...)
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  33. Martin Jay (2000). Diving Into the Wreck: Aesthetic Spectatorship at the Fin-de-Siècle. Critical Horizons 1 (1):93-111.score: 3.0
    The popularity of films like Titanic betokens a massive shift in the nature of aesthetic spectatorship in our time. The contemplative, distanced viewer who is able to judge from afar the spectacle before him or her, has been replaced by a more proximate, involved "kinaesthetic" subject whose body is stimulated as much as his or her eye. This is evident not only in mass culture with amusement thrill rides and the return of what has been called the "cinema of (...)
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  34. Brian Grant (1995). Wittgenstein's Elephant and Closet Tortoise. Philosophy 70 (272):191 - 215.score: 3.0
    Locke reports, in his discussion of substance and with some amusement, on the Indian philosopher who, when asked what the earth rests on, postulated an elephant and then, when asked in turn about the elephant, decided to go with a tortoise. Locke's amusement, of course, is justified. But it is also tempered if not downright equivocal. For he sees that at some point a very special elephant or—if we stick to the Indian's story—a very special tortoise will have (...)
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  35. Denis Dutton, Freedom and the Theatre of Ideas.score: 3.0
    I want to address a number of interrelated issues that confront the modern theatre. My main concern is to ask, why should we have a theatre of ideas ? The theatre of entertainment is unproblematic: though it has an important place in cultural life, it is undemanding, having the essential purpose of amusement. The theatre of ideas, on the other hand, is a theatre that provokes us to think about morality, human relations, history, or politics. What place does a (...)
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  36. John Alan Cohan (2003). Is Hunting a “Sport”? International Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (2):291-326.score: 3.0
    This essay discusses the question of whether hunting is a competitive sport. The discussion approaches this issue from several angles. The author asserts that there is an anthropomorphic fallacy that the “superiority” of human beings justifies the “right” to exploit animals. The discussion turns to an historical analysis of how hunting emerged as a “sport.” The author discusses evolving standards of what constitutes acceptable forms of amusement, and the basis of moral criticisms of hunting. The author then claims that (...)
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  37. Rainer Reisenzein, Markus Studtmann & Gernot Horstmann (2013). Coherence Between Emotion and Facial Expression: Evidence From Laboratory Experiments. Emotion Review 5 (1):16-23.score: 3.0
    Evidence on the coherence between emotion and facial expression in adults from laboratory experiments is reviewed. High coherence has been found in several studies between amusement and smiling; low to moderate coherence between other positive emotions and smiling. The available evidence for surprise and disgust suggests that these emotions are accompanied by their “traditional” facial expressions, and even components of these expressions, only in a minority of cases. Evidence concerning sadness, anger, and fear is very limited. For sadness, one (...)
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  38. Liu Hui-Lin (1979). The Poverty of Philosophy and the Philosophy of Poverty. Contemporary Chinese Thought 11 (2):55-76.score: 3.0
    No apology, I imagine, is necessary for the appearance of this translation\nof Marx's "Misere de la Philosophic" On the contrary it is strange\nthat it should not have been published in England before, anu that\nthe translation of his monumental work, the "Capital," tardy as that\nwas, should have yet been made before that of a work which was originally\npublished some twenty years before "Capital" first appeared.\n\n\nIt may be that the translators and editors of the latter work were\nof opinion that in view of (...)
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  39. Alexandra Cook, The 'Septie`Me Promenade' of the Reˆveries: A Peculiar Account of Rousseau's Botany?score: 3.0
    IN an article on Rousseau’s annotations of a popular botany text, Henry Cheyron describes the Genevan philosopher as ‘ce botaniste me´juge´’. 3 The misapprehension of Rousseau’s botanical practice identified by Cheyron has its roots, I believe, in Rousseau’s own depiction of his botanising in the Reˆveries; in the ‘Septie`me promenade’ Rousseau selfconsciously portrays this study as socially isolated, lazy and lacking in direction: ‘La botanique est l’e´tude d’un oisif et paresseux solitaire... Il se prome`ne, il erre librement d’un objet a` (...)
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  40. Bruce Robbins, Anatomy of a Hoax.score: 3.0
    But which weaknesses? Even people who followed the story with some interest and amusement may still be wondering what, exactly, the hoax proved. As one of the editors of Social Text, I freely confess what I think it proved about us: that some scientific ignorance and some absentmindedness could combine with much enthusiasm for a supposed political ally to produce a case of temporary blindness. It remains to be seen, however, whether our editorial failure is really symptomatic of a (...)
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  41. Jason Behrmann (2007). Review of Arthur L. Caplan, Smart Mice, Not-So-Smart People: An Interesting and Amusing Guide to Bioethics. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 7 (7):49-50.score: 3.0
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  42. Tatjana Buklijas (2010). Public Anatomies in Fin - de - Siècle Vienna. Medicine Studies 2 (1):71-92.score: 3.0
    Anatomical exhibitions, online atlases and televised dissections have recently attracted much attention and raised questions concerning the status of and the authority over the human body, the purpose of anatomical education within and outside medical schools and the methods of teaching in the digital age. I propose that for understanding the current public views of anatomy, we need to gain insight into their historical development. This article focuses on anatomies accessible to non-medical audiences in the capital of the Habsburg Empire, (...)
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  43. D. R. Cooley (2003). Strict Joint and Several Liability and Justice. Journal of Business Ethics 47 (3):199 - 208.score: 3.0
    The American tort system regularly conducts a sort of lottery in which plaintiffs try to name as many defendants in a tort action as they can in order to collect a large judgment from at least one of them. This procedure is encouraged under strict joint and several liability, which permits plaintiffs to recover greater damages from defendants - usually businesses - with less moral culpability for the tort than poorer defendants, who bear greater culpability. In a case involving the (...)
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  44. William H. Davis (1983). The Beautiful — the Amusing — the Right. Philosophy Today 27 (3):269-272.score: 3.0
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  45. Julian Hilton (1987). Is the Learner a Computer Peripheral? AI and Society 1 (2):127-136.score: 3.0
    Interactive Video (IV) is now firmly established as a training tool in commerce and industry; the electronic maintenance manual is gaining ground; IV is making inroads into marketing strategies, as a point of sales device; any respectable amusement arcade will have at least one interactive video game; and of course the allied technologies of compact sound disc and CD ROM are both beginning to revolutionise their respective fields of information storage and dissemination.This paper concentrates on the specific problem of (...)
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  46. Ward E. Jones (2009). The King of Pain. The Philosophers' Magazine 47 (47):79-84.score: 3.0
    Dark comedies invite us to laugh at something which is, at least ostensibly, not funny at all. They take an act or event that would, under most descriptions or presentations, invite pity or anger, and give it characteristics that invite amusement. It is essential to the humour of the kidnapping in The King of Comedy that it is a kidnapping. The immorality of this event is crucial to its humour.
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  47. Michael Levin (1995). A Spirited and Amusing Defense of Scrooge. The Chesterton Review 21 (1/2):215-217.score: 3.0
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  48. Philip Lieberman (1996). Universal Grammar and Critical Periods: A Most Amusing Paradox. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):735.score: 3.0
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  49. Stephen Makin (2013). Amusing Gorgias. Ancient Philosophy 33 (2):291-305.score: 3.0
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  50. Roger Rees (2000). D. R. Slavitt: Ausonius: Three Amusements . Pp. Xii + 87. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1998. Cased, £21.50. ISBN: 0-8122-3472-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (01):303-.score: 3.0
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