Search results for 'Arts Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Matthew Kieran & Dominic Lopes (eds.) (2003). Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge.score: 156.0
    Imagination is a central concept in aesthetics with close ties to issues in the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language, yet it has not received the kind of sustained, critical attention it deserves. Imagination, Philosophy and the Arts represents the work of fifteen young yet distinguished philosophers of art, who critically examine just how and in what form the notion of imagination illuminates fundamental problems in the philosophy of art. All new papers, a (...)
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  2. Caroline van Eck, James McAllister & Renée van de Vall (eds.) (1995). The Question of Style in Philosophy and the Arts. Cambridge University Press.score: 156.0
    The eighteenth and nineteenth centuries witnessed a change in the perception of the arts and of philosophy. In the arts this transition occurred around 1800, with, for instance, the breakdown of Vitruvianism in architecture, while in philosophy the foundationalism of which Descartes and Spinoza were paradigmatic representatives, which presumed that philosophy and the sciences possessed a method of ensuring the demonstration of truths, was undermined by the idea, asserted by Nietzsche and Wittgenstein, that there exist (...)
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  3. Hugh J. Silverman (ed.) (1990). Postmodernism: Philosophy and the Arts. Routledge.score: 156.0
    The essays collected here present a cross section of the debates on postmodernism being waged in philosophy and the arts. Some contributors raise general questions about postmodernism, for example, its language and its politics. Others offer specific readings of architecture, painting, literature, theatre, photography, film, and television.
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  4. Jhoon Rhee (2000). Jhoon Rhee Martial Arts: Philosophy & Life Skills. Jhoon Rhee Foundation for International Leadership.score: 150.0
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  5. David Davies (2011). Philosophy of the Performing Arts. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 138.0
    This book provides an accessible yet sophisticated introduction to the significant philosophical issues concerning the performing arts.
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  6. Herman Kauz (1977). The Martial Spirit: An Introduction to the Origin, Philosophy, and Psychology of the Martial Arts. Overlook Press.score: 132.0
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  7. Paul Thom (1993). For an Audience: A Philosophy of the Performing Arts. Temple University Press.score: 132.0
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  8. Urbain Vermeulen & D. Smedet (eds.) (1998). Philosophy and Arts in the Islamic World: Proceedings of the Eighteenth Congress of the Union Européenne des Arabisants Et Islamisants Held at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, September 3-September 9, 1996. [REVIEW] Uitgeverij Peeters.score: 126.0
    The volume contains 26 contributions to literature, philosophy, linguistics and epigraphy in Islamic culture, ranging from pre-Islamic poetry to contemporary ...
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  9. Philip Alperson (ed.) (1992). The Philosophy of the Visual Arts. Oxford University Press.score: 124.0
    Most instructors who teach introductory courses in aesthetics or the philosophy of arts use the visual arts as their implicit reference for "art" in general, yet until now there has been no aesthetics anthology specifically orientated to the visual arts. This text stresses conceptual and theoretical issues, first examining the very notion of "the visual arts" and then investigating philosophical questions raised by various forms, from painting, the paradigmatic form, to sculpture, photography, film, dance, kitsch, (...)
     
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  10. Brian Massumi (2011). Semblance and Event: Activist Philosophy and the Occurrent Arts. Mit Press.score: 120.0
    Introduction. Activist philosophy and the occurrent arts -- The ether and your anger toward a speculative pragmatism -- The thinking-feeling of what happens putting the radical back in empiricism -- The diagram as technique of existence ovum of the universe segmented -- Arts of experience, politics of expression In four movements. First movement. To dance a storm -- Second movement. Life unlimited -- Third movement. The paradox of content -- Fourth movement. Composing the political.
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  11. Peter Kivy (1997). Philosophies of Arts: An Essay in Differences. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
    Since the beginning of the eighteenth century the philosophy of art has been engaged on the project of trying to find out what the fine arts have in common and, thus, how they might be defined. Peter Kivy's purpose in this accessible and lucid book is to trace the history of that enterprise and argue that the definitional project has been unsuccessful. He offers a fruitful change of strategy: instead of engaging in an obsessive quest for sameness, let (...)
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  12. Henk Oosterling & Ewa Płonowska Ziarek (eds.) (2010). Intermedialities: Philosophy, Arts, Politics. Lexington Books.score: 120.0
    At stake here are the political analyses of new modes of being in common that transcend national boundaries, the critique of the new forms of domination that accompany them, and the search for new emancipatory possibilities.
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  13. Richard Thomas Eldridge (2003). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Art. Cambridge University Press.score: 108.0
    In this book Richard Eldridge presents a clear and compact survey of philosophical theories of the nature and significance of art. Drawing on materials from classical and contemporary philosophy as well as from literary theory and art criticism, he explores the representational, expressive, and formal dimensions of art, and he argues that works of art present their subject matter in ways that are of enduring cognitive, moral, and social interest. His discussion, illustrated with a wealth of examples, ranges over (...)
     
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  14. Kathleen Kuiper (ed.) (2010). The Ideas That Change the World: The Essential Guide to Modern Philosophy, Science, Math, and the Arts. Fall River Press/Britannica Educational Pub. In Association with Rosen Educational Services.score: 108.0
    The biological sciences -- Mathematics and the physical sciences -- The arts -- The social sciences, philosophy, and religion -- Politics and the law.
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  15. Bert Olivier (2009). Philosophy and the Arts: Collected Essays. Peter Lang.score: 106.0
    This collection of philosophical essays addresses important issues in the arts, encompassing painting, sculpture, photography, film and architecture.
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  16. David Goldblatt & Lee Brown (eds.) (2011). Aesthetics: A Reader in Philosophy of the Arts. Pearson Education.score: 102.0
    Painting -- Photography and film -- Architecture and the third dimension -- Music -- Literature -- Performance -- Popular art and everyday aesthetics -- Classic sources -- Contemporary sources.
     
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  17. William Alexander Hammond (1934). A Bibliography of Aesthetics and of the Philosophy of the Fine Arts From 1900 to 1932. New York, Longmans, Green, and Company.score: 100.0
     
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  18. Joseph Margolis (ed.) (1987). Philosophy Looks at the Arts: Contemporary Readings in Aesthetics. Temple University Press.score: 100.0
     
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  19. Morris[from old catalog] Weitz (1950/1964). Philosophy of the Arts. Cambridge, Harvard University Press.score: 100.0
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  20. David Carrier (2009). Proust/Warhol: Analytical Philosophy of Art. Peter Lang.score: 98.0
    Introduction -- Ch. 1. The search for Proust's and Warhol's sources -- Ch. 2. Dramatically opposed styles of art making -- Ch. 3. Defining art -- Ch. 4. Elstir's studio/Warhol's factory -- Ch. 5. Queer art making -- Ch. 6. The value of art -- Ch. 7. Art fashion -- Acknowledgments -- Bibliography.
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  21. Gordon Graham (2000). Philosophy of the Arts: An Introduction to Aesthetics. Routledge.score: 96.0
    Most books on aesthetics tend to be either too theoretical for the arts or not theoretical enough for philosophy. This book strikes a new and better balance between these competing interests. By taking a normative question--why should we value the arts?--it manages to develop a genuinely philosophical understanding of art and its value while never losing sight of the poems, pictures and music which draw and sustain interest in the arts. In this new second edition, chapters (...)
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  22. Andrew E. Benjamin (ed.) (1995). Complexity: Architecture, Art, Philosophy. Distributed to the Trade in the United States of America by National Book Network.score: 96.0
    JPVA Journal of Philosophy and the Visual Arts No 6 Complexity Architecture / Art / Philosophy 'Beginning with complexity will involve working with the recognition that there has always been more than one. Here however this insistent "more than one" will be positioned beyond the scope of semantics; rather than complexity occurring within the range of meaning and taking the form of a generalised polysemy, it will be linked to the nature of the object and to its (...)
     
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  23. John Ayotunde Isola Bewaji (2012). Black Aesthetics: Beauty and Culture: An Introduction to African and African Diaspora Philosophy of Arts. Africa World Press.score: 96.0
    Introduction -- Biographical details -- The nature of the philosophic enterprise: initial issues -- Contemporary scholarship on (African) arts -- Artistic expression in Africa -- Philosophy and artistic expression in Africa -- Arts, memory and identity -- Conclusion.
     
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  24. David Boersema (2012). Philosophy of Art: Aesthetic Theory and Practice. Westview Press.score: 96.0
     
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  25. Sangeetha Menon (ed.) (2006). Consciousness, Experience, and Ways of Knowing: Perspectives From Science, Philosophy & the Arts. National Institute of Advances Studies.score: 96.0
     
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  26. Karol Berger (2000). A Theory of Art. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    What, if anything, has art to do with the rest of our lives, and in particular with those ethical and political issues that matter to us most? Will art created today be likely to play a role in our lives as profound as that of the best art of the past? A Theory of Art shifts the focus of aesthetics from the traditional debate of "what is art?" to the engaging question of "what is art for?" Skillfully describing the social (...)
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  27. Patrick R. Daly (2009). A Theory of Health Science and the Healing Arts Based on the Philosophy of Bernard Lonergan. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (2):147-160.score: 90.0
    This paper represents a preliminary investigation relating Bernard Lonergan’s thought to health science and the healing arts. First, I provide background for basic elements of Lonergan’s theoretical terminology that I employ. As inquiry is the engine of Lonergan’s method, next I specify two questions that underlie medical insights and define several terms, including health, disease, and illness, in relation to these questions. Then I expand the frame of reference to include all disciplines involved in the cycle of clinical interaction (...)
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  28. Jean-Luc Nancy (2006). Multiple Arts: The Muses II. Stanford University Press.score: 90.0
    This collection of writings by Jean-Luc Nancy, the renowned French critic and poet, delves into the history of philosophy to locate a fundamentally poetic modus operandi there. The book represents a daring mixture of Nancy’s philosophical essays, writings about artworks, and artwork of his own. With theoretical rigor, Nancy elaborates on the intrinsic multiplicity of art as a concept of “making,” and outlines the tensions inherent in the faire, the “making” that characterizes the very process of production and thereby (...)
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  29. Hiromasa Mase (1989). Ecophilosophy as Liberal Arts Philosophy. Philosophical Inquiry 11 (1-2):28-36.score: 90.0
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  30. Henry Chadwick (1981). Boethius, the Consolations of Music, Logic, Theology, and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    The Consolations of Philosophy by Boethius, whose English translators include King Alfred, Geoffrey Chaucer, and Queen Elizabeth I, ranks among the most remarkable books to be written by a prisoner awaiting the execution of a tyrannical death sentence. Its interpretation is bound up with his other writings on mathematics and music, on Aristotelian and propositional logic, and on central themes of Christian dogma. -/- Chadwick begins by tracing the career of Boethius, a Roman rising to high office under the (...)
     
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  31. John Dilworth (2005). The Double Content of Art. Prometheus Books.score: 90.0
    The Double Content view is the first comprehensive theory of art that is able to satisfactorily explain the nature of all kinds of artworks in a unified way — whether paintings, novels, or musical and theatrical performances. The basic thesis is that all such representational artworks involve two levels or kinds of representation: a first stage in which a concrete artifact represents an artwork, and a second stage in which that artwork in turn represents its subject matter. "Dilworth applies his (...)
     
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  32. Caroline Guibet Lafaye (2006). Postmodern Arts, Philosophy of Language and Phenomenology. Studia Phaenomenologica 6:407-424.score: 90.0
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  33. Mary Sanders Pollock & Catherine Rainwater (eds.) (2005). Figuring Animals: Essays on Animal Images in Art, Literature, Philosophy, and Popular Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 90.0
    Figuring Animals is a collection of fifteen essays concerning the representation of animals in literature, the visual arts, philosophy, and cultural practice. At the turn of the new century, it is helpful to reconsider our inherited understandings of the species, some of which are still useful to us. It is also important to look ahead to new understandings and new dialogue, which may contribute to the survival of us all. The contributors to this volume participate in this dialogue (...)
     
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  34. Salim Kemal, Ivan Gaskell & Daniel W. Conway (eds.) (1998). Nietzsche, Philosophy and the Arts. Cambridge University Press.score: 86.0
    Nietzsche's writings have shaped much contemporary reflection on the relation between philosophy and art. This book brings together a number of distinguished contributors to examine his aesthetic account of the origins and ends of philosophy. They discuss the transformative power which Nietzsche ascribes to aesthetic activity, including his aesthetic justification of existence and its fusion of social and personal existence, and they investigate his experiments with an 'aesthetic politics' and a politicisation of aesthetics. Together their essays set out (...)
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  35. Aaron Smuts (2005). Video Games and the Philosophy of Art. American Society for Aesthetics Newsletter.score: 84.0
    The most cursory look at video games raises several interesting issues that have yet to receive any consideration in the philosophy of art, such as: Are videogames art and, if so, what kind of art are they? Are they more closely related to film, or are they similar to performance arts, such as dance? Perhaps they are more akin to competitive sports and games like diving and chess? Can we even define “video game” or “game”? We often say (...)
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  36. Dale Jacquette (ed.) (1996). Schopenhauer, Philosophy, and the Arts. Cambridge University Press.score: 84.0
    This collection brings together thirteen new essays by some of the most respected contemporary scholars of Schopenhauer's aesthetics from a wide spectrum of philosophical perspectives. The dynamics of the empirical will and Will as a thing-in-itself in the interplay of Schopenhauer's metaphysics and philosophy of fine art has important implications for the freedom, salvation, and tragic suffering of the artist, the representation of Platonic Ideas in art, and the role of artistic inspiration, emotion, and aesthetic pleasure in the beautiful (...)
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  37. Ronald Bogue (2003). Deleuze on Music, Painting, and the Arts. Routledge.score: 84.0
    Bogue provides a systematic overview and introduction to Deleuze's writings on music and painting, and an assessment of their position within his aesthetics as a whole. Deleuze on Music, Painting and the Arts breaks new ground in the scholarship on Deleuze's aesthetics, while providing a clear and accessible guide to his often overlooked writings in the fields of music and painting.
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  38. Benjamin Rutter (2010). Hegel on the Modern Arts. Cambridge University Press.score: 84.0
    Debates over the 'end of art' have tended to obscure Hegel's work on the arts themselves. Benjamin Rutter opens this study with a defence of art's indispensability to Hegel's conception of modernity; he then seeks to reorient discussion toward the distinctive values of painting, poetry, and the novel. Working carefully through Hegel's four lecture series on aesthetics, he identifies the expressive possibilities particular to each medium. Thus, Dutch genre scenes animate the everyday with an appearance of vitality; metaphor frees (...)
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  39. Robert Anderson (2012). Martial Arts and Philosophy: Beating and Nothingness. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (4):820 - 820.score: 84.0
    Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Volume 90, Issue 4, Page 820, December 2012.
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  40. Salim Kemal & Ivan Gaskell (eds.) (1993). Explanation and Value in the Arts. Cambridge University Press.score: 84.0
    Explanation and Value in the Arts offers penetrating studies by art historians, literary theorists, and philosophers, of issues central to explaining works of literature and painting. The first chapters look at the sources of interest in the fine arts and point to the intimate relation between aesthetic and other values. The next contributions develop the interaction between value and explanation in the study of the arts, including considerations of the nature of creativity and the principles for the (...)
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  41. Joseph Margolis (1962). Philosophy Looks at the Arts. New York, Scribner.score: 84.0
    Of the 24 articles included more than half are new to this edition.The new edition emphasizes opposing currents in aesthetics with contributions from the most ...
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  42. Eugene W. Holland, Daniel W. Smith & Charles J. Stivale (eds.) (2009). Gilles Deleuze: Image and Text. Continuum.score: 84.0
    Gilles Deleuze: Image and Text focuses on the intersection between Deleuzian philosophy and the arts.
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  43. Bryan Magee (2005). Philosophy's Neglect of the Arts. Philosophy 80 (3):413-422.score: 84.0
    It is widely agreed that the arts can give us some of the most valuable and profound experiences of which we are capable, yet the conceptions of experience to which epistemology has addressed itself during its long history have usually omitted experience of the arts. This has had harmful consequences, because it has led to theories of experience being accepted which would have been falsified by a consideration of experience of the arts. The error still occurs, and (...)
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  44. Chozan Niwa (2006). The Demon's Sermon on the Martial Arts and Other Tales. Kodansha International.score: 84.0
    The Demon said to the swordsman, "Fundamentally, man's mind is not without good. It is simply that from the moment he has life, he is always being brought up with perversity. Thus, having no idea that he has gotten used to being soaked in it, he harms his self-nature and falls into evil. Human desire is the root of this perversity." Woven deeply into the martial traditions and folklore of Japan, the fearsome Tengu dwell in the country's mountain forest. Mythical (...)
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  45. Egbert P. Bos & H. A. Krop (eds.) (1993). John Buridan, a Master of Arts: Some Aspects of His Philosophy: Acts of the Second Symposium Organized by the Dutch Society for Medieval Philosophy Medium Aevum on the Occasion of its 15th Anniversary, Leiden-Amsterdam (Vrije Universiteit), 20-21 June, 1991. [REVIEW] Ingenium Publishers.score: 84.0
  46. Souleymane Bachir Diagne (2011). African Art as Philosophy: Senghor, Bergson, and the Idea of Negritude. Seagull Books.score: 84.0
    Le;opold Se;dar Senghor (1906–2001) was a Senegalese poet and philosopher who in 1960 also became the first president of the Republic of Senegal. In African Art as Philosophy , Souleymane Bachir Diagne takes a unique approach to reading Senghor’s influential works, taking as the starting point for his analysis Henri Bergson’s idea that in order to understand philosophers one must find the initial intuition from which every aspect of their work develops. In the case of Senghor, Diagne argues that (...)
     
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  47. Herbert Wallace Schneider, Craig Walton & John Peter Anton (eds.) (1974). Philosophy and the Civilizing Arts: Essays Presented to Herbert W. Schneider. Ohio University Press.score: 84.0
     
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  48. Dennis J. Sporre (2011). Perceiving the Arts: An Introduction to the Humanities. Pearson.score: 84.0
    Introduction. What are the arts and how do we respond to and evaluate them? -- Pictures : drawing, painting, printmaking, and photography -- Sculpture -- Architecture -- Music -- Literature -- Theatre -- Cinema -- Dance.
     
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  49. Richard Buchanan (2001). Design and the New Rhetoric: Productive Arts in the Philosophy of Culture. Philosophy and Rhetoric 34 (3):183-206.score: 78.0
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  50. Donald Arnstine (1997). The Arts of Schooling and the Role of Philosophy: Response to Colin Wringe. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 16 (4):423-427.score: 78.0
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