This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
120 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 120
  1. Catharine Abell (2015). II—Genre, Interpretation and Evaluation. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 115 (1pt1):25-40.
    The genre to which an artwork belongs affects how it is to be interpreted and evaluated. An account of genre and of the criteria for genre membership should explain these interpretative and evaluative effects. Contrary to conceptions of genres as categories distinguished by the features of the works that belong to them, I argue that these effects are to be explained by conceiving of genres as categories distinguished by certain of the purposes that the works belonging to them are intended (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2. Derek Allan, Literature and the Passing of Time: Reflecting on the Temporal Nature of Art.
    The paper explores the much-neglected but crucial topic of the capacity of art to transcend time.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Derek Allan, Analytic Aesthetics and the Dilemma of Timelessness.
    The paper highlights analytic aesthetics’ unacknowledged assumption that art is timeless, a view it inherited from Enlightenment thinkers such as Hume and Kant, who in turn inherited it from the Renaissance. This view, I contend, is no longer tenable because it is at obvious variance with our experience of the art of the past. Analytic aesthetics avoids examining this key problem because it confines its attention to issues such as the nature of aesthetic pleasure, whether the appreciation of art should (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Derek Allan, Analytic Aesthetics and the Dilemma of Timelessness.
    Explores the failure of analytic aesthetics to examine the question of the capacity of art to transcend time, and its own commitment – seldom explicitly acknowledged – to the assumption that this capacity functions through the traditional, but no longer viable, notion of timelessness inherited from Enlightenment aesthetics.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Derek Allan (2016). Vanquishing Temporal Distance: Malraux, Art and Metamorphosis. Australian Journal of French Studies 53 (1-2):136-148.
    How does art – literature, visual art, or music – endure over time? What special power does it possess that enables it to “transcend” time – to overcome temporal distance and speak to us not just as evidence of times gone by, but as a living presence? The Renaissance, which discovered this transcendent power of art in the classical sculpture and literature it admired so strongly, concluded that great art is impervious to time – “timeless”, “immortal”, “eternal” – a belief (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Derek Allan (2014). André Malraux. In Michael Kelly (ed.), Encyclopedia of Aesthetics. 2nd edition (Oxford University Press). 239-243 (Vol 4).
    An overview of Malraux's theory of art, with sub-headings: "Basic Principles","The Creative Process","The Emergence of 'Art'","Art and Time", "The Modern Universal World of Art", and "Critical Responses". Includes a brief discussion of the musée imaginaire.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Derek Allan (2010). The Creative Process: An Aspect of André Malraux’s Theory of Art. Revue/Malraux/Review 37:66-84.
    Examines Malraux's account of the creative process in art, discusses a misreading of Malraux by Merleau-Ponty, and highlights shortcomings in certain "analytic aesthetics" accounts of the creative process.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Derek Allan (2009). Art and the Human Adventure: André Malraux's Theory of Art. Rodopi.
    " Suitable for both newcomers to Malraux and more advanced students, the study also examines critical responses to these works by figures such as Maurice ...
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Derek Allan (2009). An Intellectual Revolution: André Malraux and the Temporal Nature of Art. Journal of European Studies 39 (2):198-224.
    Very little has been written in recent decades about the temporal nature of art. The two principal explanations provided by our Western cultural tradition are that art is timeless (`eternal') or that it belongs within the world of historical change. Neither account offers a plausible explanation of the world of art as we know it today, which contains large numbers of works which are self-evidently not timeless because they have been resurrected after long periods of oblivion with significances quite different (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Derek Allan (2007). Art, Time and Metamorphosis. In Jan Lloyd Jones (ed.), Art and Time. Australian Scholarly Publishing 1.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Derek Allan (2003). Art as Anti-Destiny: Foundations of André Malraux’s Theory of Art. Literature and Aesthetics 13 (2):7-16.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Derek Allan (2003). André Malraux and the Challenge to Aesthetics. Journal of European Studies 33 (128): 23-40.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. F. Antal (1952). The Moral Purpose of Hogarth's Art. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 15 (3/4):169-197.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. R. J. B. (1968). On Quality in Art. Review of Metaphysics 21 (3):560-561.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Sondra Bacharach (2007). The Philosophy of Art. By Davies, Stephen. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (2):240–242.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Andrea Baldini (2015). An Urban Carnival on the City Walls: The Visual Representation of Financial Power in European Street Art. Journal of Visual Culture 14 (2):246-252.
    By discussing a selection of socially engaged street artworks from the Frankfurt-based project ‘Under Art Construction’, this essay sheds light on street art’s possibilities as a form of resistance against the power of globalizing finance. The author argues that through the use of carnivalesque strategies of irony and appropriation, street art can challenge the pretense of rationality of recent policies of austerity in the eurozone. Such a challenge exposes the contingency of spending cut programs. He finally suggests that, in debunking (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Andrea Baldini (2015). An Urban Carnival on the City Walls: The Visual Representation of Financial Power in European Street Art. Journal of Visual Culture 14 (2):246-252.
    By discussing a selection of socially engaged street artworks from the Frankfurt-based project ‘Under Art Construction’, this essay sheds light on street art’s possibilities as a form of resistance against the power of globalizing finance. The author argues that through the use of carnivalesque strategies of irony and appropriation, street art can challenge the pretense of rationality of recent policies of austerity in the eurozone. Such a challenge exposes the contingency of spending cut programs. He finally suggests that, in debunking (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Cyril Barrett (1982). The Morality of Artistic Production. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 41 (2):137-144.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19. Christopher Bartel (2010). The 'Fine Art' of Pornography? In Dave Monroe (ed.), Porn: Philosophy for Everyone. Wiley-Blackwell 153--65.
    Can pornographic depictions have artistic value? Much pornography closely resembles art, at least in many superficial respects. Films, photographs, paintings—all of these can have artistic value. Of course, films, photographs and paintings can also be pornographic. If some photographs have artistic value, and some photographs are pornographic, can pornographic photographs have artistic value too? I argue that pornography may only possess artistic value despite, not by virtue of, its pornographic content.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Christopher Bartel (2005). Art and Value. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (1):94-96.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Christopher Bartel (2004). Is Art Good for Us? Beliefs About High Culture in American Life. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (1):93-96.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Jane Bennett (2015). Encounters with an Art-Thing. Evental Aesthetics 3 (3):91-110.
    What kind of things are damaged art-objects? Are they junk, trash, mere stuff? Or do they remain art by virtue of their distinguished provenance or still discernible design? What kind of powers do such things have as material bodies and forces? Instead of attempting to locate proper concepts for salvaged art-things, this essay, from a perspective centered on the power of bodies-in-encounter – where “power” in Spinoza’s sense is the capacity to affect and be affected – attempts to home in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Guy Bennett-Hunter (2009). Absurd Creation: An Existentialist View of Art? Philosophical Frontiers 4 (1):49-58.
    What are we to make of works of art whose apparent point is to convince us of the meaninglessness and absurdity of human existence? I examine, in this paper, the attempt of Albert Camus to provide philosophical justification of art in the face of the supposed fact of absurdity and note its failure as such with specific reference to Sartre’s criticism. Despite other superficial similarities, I contrast Camus’s concept of the absurd with that of his ‘existentialist’ colleagues, including Sartre, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Alessandro Bertinetto (2006). Arte como desrealización. Daimon: Revista de Filosofia 39:175-185.
    The paper recognizes the failure of contemporary non-aesthetic theories of art and aims at recovering the phenomenological notion of derealization – which re-emerges in A. Dantoʼs idea of the ʻbracketting effectʼ of art –, in order to explain art and art-experience. The main point is that art makes us free from the ʻreal worldʼ through an act of derealization that leads to the establishment of possible or fictional worlds different from the one we live in. Artworks are primarly imaginary, unreal (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Martijn Boven (2008). Wat vastgelegd is, misleidt ons: de Cahiers van Paul Valéry. Deus Ex Machina 127:5-6.
    Paul Valéry is de dichter die zwijgt; de denker die weigert filosoof te zijn; de schrijver die de taal in staat van beschuldiging stelt; de expert die volhoudt een amateur te zijn; de mysticus die zijn heil zoekt bij de wiskunde; de stamelaar die aan een kwaal van precisie lijdt; de Narcissus die misschien toch liever Orpheus had willen zijn. Hij is de chroniqueur van het denken en de meester van de tegenspraak. Ik probeer me hem voor te stellen. (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Antoon Braeckman (2004). From the Work of Art to Absolute Reason. Review of Metaphysics 57 (3):551 - 569.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Ben Bramble (2015). On Susan Wolf’s “Good-for-Nothings". Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (5):1071-1081.
    According to welfarism about value, something is good simpliciter just in case it is good for some being or beings. In her recent Presidential Address to the American Philosophical Association, “Good-For-Nothings”, Susan Wolf argues against welfarism by appeal to great works of art, literature, music, and philosophy. Wolf provides three main arguments against this view, which I call The Superfluity Argument, The Explanation of Benefit Argument, and The Welfarist’s Mistake. In this paper, I reconstruct these arguments and explain where, in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Jochen Briesen (2014). Pictorial Art and Epistemic Aims. In Harald Klinke (ed.), Art Theory as Visual Epistemology. Cambridge Scholars Publishing 11-28.
    The question whether art is of any epistemic value is an old question in the philosophy of art. Whereas many contemporary artists, art-critics, and art-historians answer this question affirmatively, many contemporary philosophers remain skeptical. If art is of epistemic significance, they maintain, then it has to contribute to our quest of achieving our most basic epistemic aim, namely knowledge.Unfortunately, recent and widely accepted analyses of knowledge make it very hard to see how art might significantly contribute to the quest of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Curtis Brown (2002). Art, Oppression, and the Autonomy of Aesthetics. In Alex Neill & Aaron Ridley (eds.), Arguing About Art, Second Edition. Routledge
    Mary Devereaux has suggested, in an overview of feminist aesthetics[1], that feminist aesthetics constitutes a revolutionary approach to the field: "aesthetics cannot simply 'add on' feminist theories as it might add new works by [ Nelson ] Goodman, Arthur Danto or George Dickie. To take feminism seriously involves rethinking our basic concepts and recasting the history of the discipline." In particular, feminist theory involves a rejection of "deeply entrenched assumptions about the universal value of art and aesthetic experience." Overthrowing these (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Malcolm Budd (2014). Artistic Merit. Journal of Aesthetic Education 48 (1):10-24.
    If you are interested in art, you engage in artistic evaluation, thinking of one work as being better than another; one artist as being better than another; some works and some artists as being great, mediocre, or poor; and, perhaps, thinking of some forms or genres of art as being superior to others in that works within the favored form or genre have achieved or can aspire to a higher artistic value than is possible for those less favored. The greatest (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Malcolm Budd (2014). Morality, Society, and the Love of Art. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 51 (2):170-207.
    The principal focus of the essay is the idea of artistic value, understood as the value of a work of art as the work of art it is, and the essay explores the connections, if any, between artistic value and a variety of other values in human life. I start with a series of observations about social values and then turn to moral values. Beginning from Goethe’s claim that ‘music cannot affect morality, nor can the other arts, and it would (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. V. C. C. (1956). The Dehumanization of Art and Other Writings on Art and Culture. Review of Metaphysics 10 (1):182-182.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Stephen R. L. Clark (2003). Tolstoy on Aesthetics: What is Art? By H. O. Mounce (Ashgate: Aldershot, 2001), Pp Viii + 115, £Xxxx, ISBN 0 7546 0488 8. [REVIEW] Philosophy 78 (2):289-307.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Robert R. Clewis (2008). Greenberg, Kant, and Aesthetic Judgments of Modernist Art. AE: Canadian Aesthetics Journal 18.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Tom Cochrane (2015). The Music Between Us: Is Music a Universal Language? By Kathleen Marie Higgins. [REVIEW] Mind 124 (496):1288-1292.
  36. Tom Cochrane (2014). Narrative and Character Formation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (3):303-315.
    I defend the claim that fictional narratives provide cognitive benefits to readers in virtue of helping them to understand character. Fictions allow readers to rehearse the skill of selecting and organizing into narratives those episodes of a life that reflect traits or values. Two further benefits follow: first, fictional narratives provide character models that we can apply to real-life individuals (including ourselves), and second, fictional narratives help readers to reflect on the value priorities that constitute character. I defend the plausibility (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Filippo Contesi (2012). Savoring Disgust: The Foul and the Fair in Aesthetics. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (1):113-116.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Diarmuid Costello (2004). On Late Style: Arthur Danto’s the Abuse of Beauty. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (4):424-439.
    cannot grasp what is at stake in it without taking both its claims and its tone seriously. Read philosophically, Danto wants to reconceive art’s aesthetic dimension as those features that ‘inflect’ our attitude towards a work’s meaning, and to distinguish, in so doing, between beauty that is and beauty that is not internal to that meaning. Although welcome, I argue that his attempt to carry this through is compromised by his countervailing tendency to conceive the aesthetic in non-cognitive terms. Read (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Paul Crowther (2007). Defining Art, Creating the Canon: Artistic Value in an Era of Doubt. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction : normative aesthetics and artistic value -- Culture and artistic value -- Cultural exclusion and the definition of art -- Defining art, defending the canon, contesting culture -- The aesthetic and the artistic -- From beauty to art : developing Kant's aesthetics -- The scope and value of the artistic image -- Distinctive modes of imaging -- Twofoldness : pictorial art and the imagination -- Between language and perception : literary metaphor -- Musical meaning and value -- Eternalizing the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Arnold Cusmariu (2009). The Structure of an Aesthetic Revolution. Journal of Visual Arts Practice 8 (3):163-179.
    Brought about through philosophical analysis – a first in the history of art – paradigm shifts in the ontology and epistemology of sculpture are described, motivated, and exemplified with pieces they inspired. Navigating the new aesthetic environment requires an ‘escape from Plato's Cave’ by means of a kind of phenomenological reduction. The new conceptual foundation allows artists unprecedented levels of freedom to explore and innovate, connects sculpture to music, and has the potential to enhance significantly the appreciation of art and (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Rafael De Clercq (2013). The Metaphysics of Art Restoration. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (3):261-275.
    Art restorations often give rise to controversy, and the reason does not always seem to be a lack of skill or dedication on the side of the restorer. Rather, in some of the most famous cases, the reason seems to be a lack of agreement on basic principles. In particular, there seems to be a lack of agreement on how the following two questions are to be answered. First, what is art restoration supposed to achieve, in other words, what is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  42. Julian Dodd (2014). On a Proposed Test for Artistic Value. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (4):395-407.
    In a recent paper, Robert Stecker proposes the following test for whether a value possessed by an artwork is artistic or not: ‘Does one need to understand the work to appreciate its being valuable in that way? If so, it is an artistic value. If not, it is not.’ An important question here is what Stecker means by ‘appreciation’ in this context. Stecker himself says little about this, but I offer him two accounts of the nature of appreciation, both of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Julian Dodd (2013). Artistic Value and Sentimental Value: A Reply to Robert Stecker. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (3):282-288.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Denis Dutton, Artistic Crimes.
    The concept of forgery is a touchstone of criticism. If the existence of forgeries — and their occasional acceptance as authentic works of art — has been too often dismissed or ignored in the theory of criticism, it may be because of the forger’s special power to make the critic look ridiculous. Awkward as it is, critics have heaped the most lavish praise on art objects that have turned out to be forged. The suspicion this arouses is, of course, that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. A. Edgar (2012). Who Needs Classical Music? Cultural Choice and Musical Value. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (2):209-211.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Gene Fendt (1997). Ion"Plato's Defense of Poetry". International Studies in Philosophy 29 (4):23-50.
    Reads Ion, Plato's only dialogue on poetry as such, poetically—noting what it does as much as what it says. Doing so allows explanation of several historical anomalies and factual inconsistencies in it, and proves that the dilemma (techne/mania) of the dialogue is false; that the dilemma is intimately related to a view of language as names; that the flaw which the dialogue exhibits in the rhapsode is both moral and intellectual; that those flaws are not transferable simpliciter to the poem (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Gene Fendt (1995). Resolution, Catharsis, Culture: As You Like It. Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):248-260.
    This paper is not so much a reading of Shakespeare's play as reading through As You Like It to the kinds of resolution and catharsis that can exist in comedy. We will find two kinds of resolution and catharsis, and within each kind two sub-types. We will then read through the figures of the play and the catharses available in it to the kinds of culture that need or can use each type of catharsis.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Fimiani Filippo (2014). Only noise if you can see. Lebenswelt. Aesthetics and Philosophy of Experience 1 (4).
    What happens to critical and aesthetic discourse when a painter promises that he will not paint anymore? What goes on when a famous artist says that all the paintings are just junk or dust, and all the institutional sites of the art-world – actually, the White cube of Clement Greemberg’s Modernism – are just wasted spaces? What’s the matter or the reason of the prestige of a similar no-working man, and what’s the perceptible quality of the value of a so-called (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Dustin Garlitz (2014). Avant-Garde. In Sherwood Thompson (ed.), Encyclopedia of Diversity and Social Justice. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
  50. Ranjan K. Ghosh (1987). Artistic Communication and Symbol: Some Philosophical Reflections. British Journal of Aesthetics 27 (4):319-325.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 120