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Profile: David McNaughton (Florida State University)
  1. Eve Garrard & David McNaughton, Humility: From Sacred Virtue to Secular Vice?
    Some of the virtues have a very stable place in our understanding of goodness – beneficence and courage are unlikely ever to lose their high standing. But other virtues have something like a life cycle: they move from a marginal status to to a central one, and sometimes they move back again to the margins, or even beyond the domain of virtue altogether. Chastity is one example of this; humility is another. There was a period in which humility wasn’t a (...)
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  2. D. Mcnaughton (forthcoming). The Importance of Being Human-Response. Philosophy.
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  3. David McNaughton, Christopher Chern, How Many Selves Make Me, Stephen Rl, He is Like & Ilham Dilman (forthcoming). Philosophy News. Cogito.
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  4. Eve Garrard & David McNaughton (2014). Forgiveness. Routledge.
    Forgiveness usually gets a very good press in our culture: we are deluged with self-help books and television shows all delivering the same message, that forgiveness is good for everyone, and is always the right thing to do. But those who have suffered seriously at the hands of others often and rightly feel that this boosterism about forgiveness is glib and facile. Perhaps forgiveness is not always desirable, especially where the wrongdoing is terrible or the wrongdoer unrepentant. In this book, (...)
     
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  5. David McNaughton & Eve Garrard (2014). Forgiveness and Forgivingness. In Stan van Hooft & Nafsika Athanassoulis (eds.), The Handbook of Virtue Ethics. Acumen Publishing Ltd..
     
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  6. David McNaughton (2013). Butler's Ethics. In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press.
  7. David McNaughton (2013). J. Skorupski (Ed.),The Routledge Companion to Ethics (Abingdon: Routledge, 2010), 850 Pages. ISBN: 9780415413626 (Hbk); 9780415415163 (Pbk). Hardback $225; Paperback $50. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (3):368-370.
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  8. David Mcnaughton & Piers Rawling (2013). Contours of the Practical. In David Bakhurst, Margaret Olivia Little & Brad Hooker (eds.), Thinking About Reasons: Themes From the Philosophy of Jonathan Dancy. Oxford University Press. 240.
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  9. David McNaughton & Piers Rawling (2013). Particularism. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  10. Eve Garrard & David Mcnaughton (2012). Speak No Evil?1. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):1-17.
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  11. David McNaughton (2012). Hurka , Thomas , Ed. Underivative Duty: British Moral Philosophers From Sidgwick to Ewing Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 225. $65.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 122 (4):806-811.
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  12. Eve Garrad & David McNaughton (2011). Conditional Unconditional Forgiveness. In Christel Fricke (ed.), The Ethics of Forgiveness: A Collection of Essays. Routledge.
     
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  13. Eve Garrard & David McNaughton (2011). Forgiving for Good. The Philosophers' Magazine 52 (52):43-48.
    The repentant offender has placed himself on the side of right, so to speak – he now stands with the victim against his own previous bad behaviour, which he now rejects. He’s a proper recipient for the gift of forgiveness. It can be morally appropriate to wipe the slate clean for him. But the unrepentant offender has undergone no such change. Why should we wipe the slate clean for such a person?
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  14. David McNaughton (2011). Constancy and the Ethics of Jane Austen's Mansfield Park (Review). Philosophy and Literature 35 (2):410-412.
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  15. D. McNaughton & P. Rawling (2010). The Making/Evidential Reason Distinction. Analysis 71 (1):100-102.
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  16. David Mcnaughton (2009). Why Is So Much Philosophy So Tedious? Florida Philosophical Review 9 (2):1-13.
    Why is so much philosophy so tedious? Not, or not simply, because it is technical and complex, but because—too often—it displays mere cleverness. Implausible theories are defended against objections by ever more sophisticated technical fiddling with the details. Originality and creativity are in short supply. I argue that this is bad for philosophy, bad for philosophers, and almost inevitable given various structural features of the profession which require early and prolific publication. As a profession we are autonomous—we could change our (...)
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  17. David McNaughton & Piers Rawling (2009). Benefits, Holism, and the Aggregation of Value. Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (1):354-374.
    We reject Moorean holism about value—the view that the value of the whole does not equal the sum of the values of its parts. We propose an alternative aggregative holism according to which the value of a state of affairs is the sum of the values of its constituent states. But these constituents must be evaluated in situ.
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  18. David Mcnaughton (2008). A distinctivelymoralscepticism? Philosophical Books 49 (3):207-217.
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  19. David McNaughton (2008). A Distinctively Moral Scepticism? Philosophical Books 49 (3):207-217.
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  20. Kirsten Bell & Darlene McNaughton (2007). Feminism and the Invisible Fat Man. Body and Society 13 (1):107-131.
  21. David McNaughton, Florida State University & Piers Rawling (2007). Deontology. In David Copp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory. Oup Usa.
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  22. David McNaughton (2006). Review of Michael Huemer, Ethical Intuitionism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (9).
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  23. David McNaughton & Piers Rawling (2004). Duty, Rationality, and Practical Reasons. In Piers Rawling & Alfred R. Mele (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Rationality. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 110--131.
     
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  24. David McNaughton, Piers Rawling & Sabina Lovibond (2004). Naturalism And Normativity: Reply to McNaughton and Rawling. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 104 (1):187-203.
    McNaughton and Rawling's anti-reductionist intentions are to be welcomed, but are not well served by their continuing adherence to a neo-Humean notion of the 'descriptive'. Their too-willing acceptance of this notion is reflected in a denial of appropriate dialectical weight to considerations about the way 'pattern' disappears from the domain of value when we try to characterize the constituent features of the latter in non-evaluative terms. The need for a satisfactory account of the immanence of value in nature is real (...)
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  25. Eve Garrard & David McNaughton (2003). III-In Defence of Unconditional Forgiveness. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (1):39-60.
    In this paper, the principal objections to unconditional forgiveness are canvassed, primarily that it fails to take wrongdoing seriously enough, and that it displays a lack of self-respect. It is argued that these objections stem from a mistaken understanding of what forgiveness actually involves, including the erroneous view that forgiveness involves some degree of condoning of the offence, and is incompatible with blaming the offender or punishing him. Two positive reasons for endorsing unconditional forgiveness are considered: respect for persons and (...)
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  26. D. McNaughton (2003). The Role of Values and Leadership in Organizational Transformation. Journal of Human Values 9 (2):131-140.
    This is an analytical study of organizational transformation, values that must be present and operationalized for organizations to successfully change, and the role that leadership has in facilitat ing that change. Specifically, using De Geus' model of living and economic companies and taking input from key theorists such as Senge, Quinn, Bolman and Deal, and others, this study examines and analyzes the values and guiding principles that facilitate an organization's ability to transform, quali ties the leadership must possess and how (...)
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  27. David McNaughton & Piers Rawling (2003). Can Scanlon Avoid Redundancy by Passing the Buck? Analysis 63 (4):328–331.
    Scanlon suggests a buck-passing account of goodness. To say that something is good is not to give a reason to, say, favour it; rather it is to say that there are such reasons. When it comes to wrongness, however, Scanlon rejects a buck-passing account: to say that j ing is wrong is, on his view, to give a sufficient moral reason not to j. Philip Stratton-Lake 2003 argues that Scanlon can evade a redundancy objection against his (Scanlon’s) view of wrongness (...)
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  28. David McNaughton & Piers Rawling (2003). Naturalism and Normativity. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77 (1):23–45.
    Simon Blackburn can be seen as challenging those committed to sui generis moral facts to explain the supervenience of the moral on the descriptive. We (like perhaps Derek Parfit) hold that normative facts in general are sui generis. We also hold that the normative supervenes on the descriptive, and we here endeavour to answer the generalization of Blackburn’s challenge. In the course of pursuing this answer, we suggest that Frank Jackson’s descriptivism rests on a conception of properties inappropriate to discussions (...)
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  29. David McNaughton, Piers Rawling & Sabina Lovibond (2003). Naturalism and Normativity. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77 (1):23 - 45.
    Simon Blackburn can be seen as challenging those committed to sui generis moral facts to explain the supervenience of the moral on the descriptive. We (like perhaps Derek Parfit) hold that normative facts in general are sui generis. We also hold that the normative supervenes on the descriptive, and we here endeavour to answer the generalization of Blackburn's challenge. In the course of pursuing this answer, we suggest that Frank Jackson's descriptivism rests on a conception of properties inappropriate to discussions (...)
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  30. Eve Garrard & David McNaughton (2002). In Defence of Unconditional Forgiveness. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (1):39–60.
    In this paper, the principal objections to unconditional forgiveness are canvassed, primarily that it fails to take wrongdoing seriously enough, and that it displays a lack of self-respect. It is argued that these objections stem from a mistaken understanding of what forgiveness actually involves, including the erroneous view that forgiveness involves some degree of condoning of the offence, and is incompatible with blaming the offender or punishing him. Two positive reasons for endorsing unconditional forgiveness are considered: respect for persons and (...)
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  31. David McNaughton (2002). :Picturing the Human: The Moral Thought of Iris Murdoch. Ethics 112 (4):818-820.
    Iris Murdoch has long been known as one of the most deeply insightful and morally passionate novelists of our time. This attention has often eclipsed Murdoch's sophisticated and influential work as a philosopher, which has had a wide-ranging impact on thinkers in moral philosophy as well as religious ethics and political theory. Yet it has never been the subject of a book-length study in its own right. Picturing the Human seeks to fill this gap. In this groundbreaking book, author Maria (...)
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  32. David Mcnaughton (2002). Is God (Almost) a Consequentialist? Swinburne's Moral Theory. Religious Studies 38 (3):265-281.
    Swinburne offers a greater-goods defence to the problem of evil within a deontological framework. Yet deontologists characteristically hold that we have no right to inflict great evil on any individual to bring about the greater good. Swinburne accepts that humans generally do not have that right, but argues that God, as the supreme care-giver, does. I contend that Swinburne's argument that care-givers have such a right is flawed, and defend the classical deontological objection to imposing evils that good may come.
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  33. David McNaughton & Piers Rawling (2002). Conditional and Conditioned Reasons. Utilitas 14 (02):240-.
    This paper is a brief reponse to some of Douglas Portmore's criticisms of our version of the agent-relative/agent-neutral distinction.
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  34. David Mcnaughton & Piers Rawling (2001). Achievement, Welfare and Consequentialism. Analysis 61 (2):156–162.
    significant role for accomplishment thereby admits a ‘Trojan Horse’ (267).1 To abandon hedonism in favour of a conception of well-being that incorporates achievement is to take the first step down a slippery slope toward the collapse of the other two pillars of utilitarian morality: welfarism and consequentialism. We shall argue that Crisp’s arguments do not support these conclusions. We begin with welfarism. Crisp defines it thus: ‘Well-being is the only value. Everything good must be good for some being or beings’ (...)
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  35. R. G. Frey, Brad Hooker, F. M. Kamm, Thomas E. Hill Jr, Geoffrey Sayre-McCord, David McNaughton, Jan Narveson, Michael Slote, Alison M. Jaggar & William R. Schroeder (2000). Normative Ethics. In Hugh LaFollette - (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Ethical Theory. Blackwell Publishers.
     
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  36. David McNaughton (2000). Intuitionism. In Hugh LaFollette - (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Ethical Theory. Blackwell Publishers. 268--87.
     
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  37. David McNaughton & Piers Rawling (2000). Deontology and Value. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 47:197-208.
    Integration and coherence are central values in human existence. It would be a serious objection to any proposed way of life that it led to us being alienated or cut off from others or from some importan part of ourselves. Morality, with the strenuous demands it makes on us, is one area in which alienation is both particularly threatening and peculiarly undesirable. If morality cuts us off from some important part of ourselves then it appears unattractive, and if it cuts (...)
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  38. David McNaughton & Piers Rawling (2000). Unprincipled Ethics. In Brad Hooker & Margaret Olivia Little (eds.), Moral Particularism. Clarendon Press.
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  39. David Mcnaughton (1999). E. F. Paul, F. D. Miller Jr and J. Paul (Eds.), Cultural Pluralism and Moral Knowledge, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1994, Pp. 301. [REVIEW] Utilitas 11 (02):251-.
  40. David Mcnaughton (1999). No Title Available: Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Utilitas 11 (2):251-253.
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  41. Eve Garrard & David McNaughton (1998). Mapping Moral Motivation. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (1):45-59.
    In this paper we defend a version of moral internalism and a cognitivist account of motivation against recent criticisms. The internalist thesis we espouse claims that, if an agent believes she has reason to A, then she is motivated to A. Discussion of counter-examples has been clouded by the absence of a clear account of the nature of motivation. While we can only begin to provide such an account in this paper, we do enough to show that our version of (...)
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  42. David McNaughton & Piers Rawling (1998). On Defending Deontology. Ratio 11 (1):37–54.
    This paper comprises three sections. First, we offer a traditional defence of deontology, in the manner of, for example, W.D. Ross (1965). The leading idea of such a defence is that the right is independent of the good. Second, we modify the now standard account of the distinction, in terms of the agent-relative/agentneutral divide, between deontology and consequentialism. (This modification is necessary if indirect consequentialism is to count as a form of consequentialism.) Third, we challenge a value-based defence of deontology (...)
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  43. P. J. E. Kail, Justin Champion, J. R. Milton, Vere Chappell, David McNaughton, Sylvana Tomaselli, Janina Rosicka, Christopher Adair‐Toteff, Andy Hamilton, John Macquarrie & Antony Flew (1997). Book Review. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy 5 (1):181-220.
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  44. D. McNaughton (1997). Quinn, W.-Mortality and Action. Philosophical Books 38:58-60.
     
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  45. David McNaughton (1997). The Rational and the Moral Order: The Social Roots of Reason and Morality By Baier Kurt Chicago and LaSalle, Illinois: Open Court, Xviii + 447. Philosophy 72 (279):154-.
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  46. David Mcnaughton (1997). No Title Available: New Books. [REVIEW] Philosophy 72 (279):154-158.
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  47. David McNaughton (1996). An Unconnected Heap of Duties? Philosophical Quarterly 46 (185):433-447.
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  48. David McNaughton (1996). Moral Perception and Particularity by Lawrence A. Blum. Journal of Philosophy 93 (2):89-92.
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  49. David McNaughton & Piers Rawling (1995). Agent-Relativity and Terminological Inexactitudes. Utilitas 7 (02):319-.
  50. David McNaughton & Piers Rawling (1995). Value and Agent-Relative Reasons. Utilitas 7 (01):31-.
    In recent years the distinction between agent-relative and agent-neutral reasons has been taken by many to play a key role in distinguishing deontology from consequentialism. It is central to all universalist consequentialist theories that value is determined impersonally; the real value of any state of affairs does not depend on the point of view of the agent. No reference, therefore, to the agent or to his or her position in the world need enter into a consequentialist understanding of what makes (...)
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