Search results for 'Philosophy, Chinese' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Yam San Chee (2014). Interrogating the Learning Sciences as a Design Science: Leveraging Insights From Chinese Philosophy and Chinese Medicine. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (1):89-103.score: 162.0
    Design research has been positioned as an important methodological contribution of the learning sciences. Despite the publication of a handbook on the subject, the practice of design research in education remains an eclectic collection of specific approaches implemented by different researchers and research groups. In this paper, I examine the learning sciences as a design science to identify its fundamental goals, methods, affiliations, and assumptions. I argue that inherent tensions arise when attempting to practice design research as an analytic science. (...)
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  2. JeeLoo Liu (2006). An Introduction to Chinese Philosophy: From Ancient Philosophy to Chinese Buddhism. Blackwell Pub..score: 156.0
    An Introduction to Chinese Philosophy unlocks the mystery of ancient Chinese philosophy and unravels the complexity of Chinese Buddhism by placing them in the contemporary context of discourse. Elucidates the central issues and debates in Chinese philosophy, its different schools of thought, and its major philosophers. Covers eight major philosophers in the ancient period, among them Confucius, Laozi, and Zhuangzi. Illuminates the links between different schools of philosophy. Opens the door to further study of the relationship (...)
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  3. Karyn Lai (2008). An Introduction to Chinese Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 156.0
    This comprehensive introductory textbook to early Chinese philosophy covers a range of philosophical traditions which arose during the Spring and Autumn (722-476 BCE) and Warring States (475-221 BCE) periods in China, including Confucianism, Mohism, Daoism, and Legalism. It considers concepts, themes and argumentative methods of early Chinese philosophy and follows the development of some ideas in subsequent periods, including the introduction of Buddhism into China. The book examines key issues and debates in early Chinese philosophy, cross-influences between (...)
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  4. Zhengyu Sun (2006). Disputes Over Philosophical Views in the First Half of the Twentieth Century and Development of Contemporary Chinese Philosophy. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (1):124-132.score: 156.0
    To explore the development of contemporary Chinese philosophy, fundamentally, is to explore the development of Marxist philosophy in contemporary China. The disputes over philosophical views in Chinese academic circles during the first half of the twentieth century have been focused on understanding Marxist philosophy from such aspects as "what kind of philosophy Chinese society needs," "the relation of philosophy to science," and "philosophy as an idea to reflect on one's life." These explorations have provided us a significant (...)
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  5. Haiming Wen (2012). Chinese Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 156.0
    Chinese Philosophy provides a clear, accessible conception of the Chinese philosophical sensibility and its evolution throughout history.
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  6. Robin Wang (ed.) (2004). Chinese Philosophy in an Era of Globalization. State University of New York Press.score: 156.0
    This book treats Chinese philosophy today as a global project, presenting the work of both Chinese and Western philosophers.
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  7. Kenneth W. Holloway (2009). Guodian: The Newly Discovered Seeds of Chinese Religious and Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 156.0
    In 300 BCE, the tutor of the heir-apparent to the Chu throne was laid to rest in a tomb at Jingmen, Hubei province in central China. A corpus of bamboo-strip texts that recorded the philosophical teachings of an era was buried with him. The tomb was sealed, and China quickly became the theater of the Qin conquest, an event that proved to be one of the most significant in ancient history. For over two millennia, the texts were forgotten. But in (...)
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  8. Youlan Feng (1983). A History of Chinese Philosophy. Princeton University Press.score: 156.0
    Since its original publication in Chinese in the 1930s, this work has been accepted by Chinese scholars as the most important contribution to the study of their country's philosophy. In 1952 the book was published by Princeton University Press in an English translation by the distinguished scholar of Chinese history, Derk Bodde, "the dedicated translator of Fung Yu-lan's huge history of Chinese philosophy" ( New York Times Book Review ). Available for the first time in paperback, (...)
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  9. Fangtong Liu (2004). China's Contemporary Philosophical Journey: Western Philosophy and Marxism Chinese Philosophical Studies. Council for Research in Values and Philosophy.score: 156.0
    Modern-contemporary transformation of western philosophy -- Postmodernism and tendencies of contemporary philosophy -- Present philosophical tendencies : a comparative study of Marxist and contemporary Western philosophy -- Modern-contemporary transformation of Western philosophy and changes of ideas in morality and value -- Modern-contemporary transformation of Western philosophy and changes of Western religion and its philosophy -- A reflection on "humanism" and "philosophical trend in humanism" -- Market economy and moral theory of pragmatism -- The sixty-year samsara of studies on pragmatism and (...)
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  10. A. S. Cua (ed.) (2003). Encyclopedia of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge.score: 156.0
    Featuring contributions from the world's most highly esteemed Asian philosophy scholars, this important encyclopedia covers the complex and increasingly influential field of Chinese thought, from earliest recorded times to the present day. Including coverage on the subject previously unavailable to English speakers, the Encyclopedia sheds light on the extensive range of concepts, movements, philosophical works, and thinkers that populate the field. It includes a thorough survey of the history of Chinese philosophy; entries on all major thinkers from Confucius (...)
     
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  11. Lauren F. Pfister (ed.) (2007). Hermeneutical Thinking in Chinese Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..score: 156.0
    This volume is devoted to studying the emergence and flourishing of new humanistically informed developments in philosophical hermeneutics within contemporary Chinese philosophy. By means of some articles published previously in the Journal of Chinese Philosophy in the 1970s and 1980s, questions about the nature of philosophical understanding and the diversity of hermeneutic options in Chinese indigenous teachings – including Ruist (“Confucian”), Daoist, and Chinese Buddhist realms of exploration – are reintroduced. Following these seminal essays, a number (...)
     
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  12. Zailin Zhang (2009). Theories of Family in Ancient Chinese Philosophy. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (3):343-359.score: 150.0
    Unlike traditional Western philosophy, which places no special emphasis on the importance of family structure, traditional Chinese philosophy represented by Confucianism is a set of theories that give family a primary position. With family as the foundation, a complete framework of “human body → two genders → family and clan” is formed. Therefore, family in Chinese philosophy is existent, gender-interactive and diachronic. It should also be noted that family also plays a fundamental role in Chinese theories on (...)
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  13. Bo Chen (2006). The Debate on the Yan-Yi Relation in Chinese Philosophy: Reconstruction and Comments. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (4):539-560.score: 150.0
    The debate on the yan-yi relation was carried out by Chinese philosophers collectively, and the principles and methods in the debate still belong to a living tradition of Chinese philosophy. From Yijing (Book of Changes), Lunyu (Analects), Laozi and Zhuangzi to Wang Bi, "yi" which cannot be expressed fully by yan (language), is not only "idea" or "meaning" in the human mind, but is also some kind of ontological existence, which is beyond yan and emblematic symbols, and unspeakable. (...)
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  14. Gang Liu (2007). Philosophy of Information and Foundation for the Future Chinese Philosophy of Science and Technology. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (1):95-114.score: 150.0
    The research programme of the philosophy of information (PI) proposed in 2002 made it an independent area or discipline in philosophical research. The scientific concept of ‘information’ is formally accepted in philosophical inquiry. Hence a new and tool-driven philosophical discipline of PI with its interdisciplinary nature has been established. Philosophy of information is an ‘orientative’ rather than ‘cognitive’ philosophy. When PI is under consideration in the history of Western philosophy, it can be regarded as a shift of large tradition. There (...)
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  15. Quanxing Xu (2008). Theory on the Cultivation of Cognitive Subjects in Chinese Philosophy. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (1):39-54.score: 150.0
    The epistemology in Chinese philosophy remarkably emphasizes the cultivation of cognitive subjects. According to such epistemology, intelligence arises from benevolence, and thus morality should be valued to gain knowledge. In this way, epistemology is integrated with theories of values and cultivation. The cultivation of cognitive subjects in Chinese philosophy mainly involves a stance, attitudes, ways of thinking and feelings of a cognitive subject. To expatiate and develop the theory of the cultivation of cognitive subjects in Chinese philosophy (...)
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  16. Yunyi Zhang (2011). “The Westward Spread of Chinese Philosophy” and Marxism. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (1):114-133.score: 150.0
    Chinese philosophy was transmitted to Europe in the 18th century through Deism, organic philosophy, pure reason, absolute idea, etc., and was absorbed by modern European philosophers. Chinese philosophy has also, via German classical philosophy, directly as well as indirectly influenced Marx and been absorbed into his philosophy. There is a cultural-psychological reason for the Chinese acceptance of Marxism. However, due to the influence of Occidentalism, this period of history has long been neglected.
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  17. Xiaochao Wang (2006). On the Study of Foreign Philosophy in Chinese Cultural Construction and its Future. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (2):317-323.score: 150.0
    Since the "Conference on Foreign Philosophy" held in Wuhu in October 1978, the study of foreign philosophy in China has undergone a prosperous stage. This article discusses the significance of the study of foreign philosophy in the context of renovation, transformation and remolding of Chinese contemporary culture, explores the role of the discipline in the context of Chinese cultural construction, and anticipates the future of this discipline. A cross-cultural perspective is needed for a proper understanding of the significance (...)
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  18. Zhiping Yu (2009). The Evolution and Formation of Indigenous Narration in Chinese Philosophy. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (4):511-523.score: 150.0
    Independent narration in Chinese philosophy has gone through the process of interpretation, critical differentiation, dialogue, and original thought, and so is a creative activity that surpasses the conjunctive pattern of universality and particularity. In modern Confucian studies, there has always been a tension between philosophical and historical explanations, which suggests a tension between ecumenical and indigenous experiences. Critical differentiation itself only has methodological significance, and is not a goal in itself. China’s development and strength has encouraged China to engage (...)
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  19. Shiling Xiang (2008). A Study on the Theory of “Returning to the Original” and “Recovering Nature” in Chinese Philosophy. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (4):502-519.score: 150.0
    The approach of returning to the original and recovering nature is a typical characteristic of Chinese philosophy. It was founded by the Daoist School and followed by both Daoist and Confucian schools. The precondition of returning to the original and recovering nature is the stillness and goodness within nature integrated into a whole afterwards. Its implementation includes not only returning to the original root so as to achieve the philosophical aim but also restoration to the original (...)
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  20. Deborah Cao (2011). Visibility and Invisibility of Animals in Traditional Chinese Philosophy and Law. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (3):351-367.score: 144.0
    There is yet to be any animal welfare or protection law for domestic animals in China, one of the few countries in the world today that do not have such laws. However, in Chinese imperial law, there were legal provisions adopted more than a 1,000 years ago for the care and treatment of domestic working animals. Furthermore, in traditional Chinese philosophy, animals were regarded as constituent part of the organic whole of the cosmos by ancient Chinese philosophers (...)
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  21. Wing-tsit Chan (1963). A Source Book in Chinese Philosophy. Princeton, N.J.,Princeton University Press.score: 138.0
    This Source Book is devoted to the purpose of providing such a basis for genuine understanding of Chinese thought (and thereby of Chinese life and culture, ...
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  22. Melville Y. Stewart & Chih-kʻang Chang (eds.) (1998). The Symposium of Chinese-American Philosophy and Religious Studies. International Scholars Publications.score: 138.0
  23. A. S. Cua (2005). Human Nature, Ritual, and History: Studies in Xunzi and Chinese Philosophy. The Catholic University of America Press.score: 132.0
    In this volume, distinguished philosopher Antonio S. Cua offers a collection of original studies on Xunzi, a leading classical Confucian thinker, and on other ...
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  24. Bo Mou (ed.) (2008). Routledge History of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge.score: 132.0
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  25. Bryan W. Van Norden (2011). Introduction to Classical Chinese Philosophy. Hackett Pub..score: 132.0
    ■ ■ 1 the historical context I am not of their age or time and so have not personally heard their voices or seen their faces, but I know this by what is ...
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  26. Wade Baskin (1972/1974). Classics in Chinese Philosophy. Totowa, N.J.,Littlefield, Adams.score: 132.0
  27. Frederick J. Adelmann (ed.) (1982). Contemporary Chinese Philosophy. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Boston.score: 132.0
  28. O. Brière (1956/1979). Fifty Years of Chinese Philosophy, 1898-1950. Greenwood Press.score: 132.0
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  29. Wing-tsit Chan (1969). An Outline and an Annotated Bibliography of Chinese Philosophy. New Haven, Far Eastern Publications, Yale University.score: 132.0
     
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  30. Wing-tsit Chan (1955). An Outline and a Bibliography of Chinese Philosophy. Hanover, N.H..score: 132.0
     
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  31. Wing-tsit Chan (1955). Historical Charts of Chinese Philosophy. New Haven, Far Eastern Publications, Yale University.score: 132.0
     
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  32. Chʻu Chai (1975). The Story of Chinese Philosophy. Greenwood Press.score: 132.0
     
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  33. Zhongying Cheng & Nicholas Bunnin (eds.) (2002). Contemporary Chinese Philosophy. Blackwell Publishers.score: 132.0
  34. Zhongying Cheng & Franklin Perkins (eds.) (2010). Chinese Philosophy in Excavated Early Texts. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 132.0
    T he nine papers of this Supplement on these significant issues and important ideas are closely accentuated and critically discussed by well-established specialists, philosophers and historians, from various relevant disciplines of study.
     
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  35. Zhongying Cheng (2005). Cong Zhong Xi Hu Shi Zhong Ting Li: Zhongguo Zhe Xue Yu Zhongguo Wen Hua de Xin Ding Wei = Creative Renewal of Chinese Philosophy. Zhongguo Ren Min da Xue Chu Ban She.score: 132.0
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  36. Zhongying Cheng & On Cho Ng (eds.) (2008). The Imperative of Understanding: Chinese Philosophy, Comparative Philosophy, and Onto-Hermeneutics: A Tribute Volume Dedicated to Professor Chung-Ying Cheng. Global Scholarly Publications.score: 132.0
     
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  37. Zeng Chunhai (ed.) (2005). Zhongguo Zhe Xue Gai Lun = Introduction to Chinese Philosophy. Wu Nan Tu Shu Chu Ban Gong Si.score: 132.0
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  38. John Dankowski (1977). An English-Chinese Dictionary of Chinese Traditional Philosophy. Chinese News & World Report.score: 132.0
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  39. Keli Fang (ed.) (2003). Zhongguo Zhe Xue He 21 Shi Ji Wen Ming Zou Xiang: Di 12 Jie Guo Ji Zhongguo Zhe Xue Da Hui Lun Wen Ji Zhi Si = Chinese Philosophy and the Trends of the 21st Century Civilization. [REVIEW] Shang Wu Yin Shu Guan.score: 132.0
     
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  40. Youlan Feng (1948). A Short History of Chinese Philosophy. New York, Macmillan Co..score: 132.0
     
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  41. Youlan Feng (1947/1970). The Spirit of Chinese Philosophy. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.score: 132.0
     
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  42. Paul Rakita Goldin (2005). After Confucius: Studies in Early Chinese Philosophy. University of Hawai'i Press.score: 132.0
  43. Zhaowu He (2009). A Critical History of Classical Chinese Philosophy. New World Press.score: 132.0
     
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  44. Wai-lu Hou (1959). A Short History of Chinese Philosophy. Peking, Foreign Languages Press.score: 132.0
     
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  45. E. R. Hughes (1954). Chinese Philosophy in Classical Times. New York, Dutton.score: 132.0
     
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  46. Ernest Richard[from old catalog] Hughes (1935). Oxford and the Comparative Study of Chinese Philosophy and Religion. Oxford, the Clarendon Press.score: 132.0
     
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  47. P. J. Ivanhoe & Bryan W. Van Norden (eds.) (2005). Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy. Hackett Pub..score: 132.0
     
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  48. Bo Mou (2009). Chinese Philosophy A-Z. Edinburgh University Press.score: 132.0
  49. Bo Mou (ed.) (2006). Davidson's Philosophy and Chinese Philosophy: Constructive Engagement. Brill.score: 132.0
  50. Zongsan Mou (2004). Nineteen Lectures on Chinese Philosophy and its Implications. M. Tsung-San.score: 132.0
     
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