Search results for 'child maltreatment' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michael McFall (2009). Licensing Parents: Family, State, and Child Maltreatment. Rowman and Littlefield.score: 180.0
    In Licensing Parents, Michael McFall argues that political structures, economics, education, racism, and sexism are secondary in importance to the inequality caused by families, and that the family plays the primary role in a child's acquisition of a sense of justice. He demonstrates that examination of the family is necessary in political philosophy and that informal structures (families) and considerations (character formation) must be taken seriously. McFall advocates a threshold that should be accepted by all political philosophers: children should (...)
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  2. Brian Allen (2009). Are Researchers Ethically Obligated to Report Suspected Child Maltreatment? A Critical Analysis of Opposing Perspectives. Ethics and Behavior 19 (1):15 – 24.score: 120.0
    A number of authors have commented on the topic of mandated reporting in cases of suspected child maltreatment and the application of this requirement to researchers. Most of these commentaries focus on the interpretation of current legal standards and offer opinions for or against the imposition of mandated reporting laws on research activities. Authors on both sides of the issue offer ethical arguments, although a direct comparison and analysis of these opposing arguments is rare. This article critically examines (...)
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  3. Lars Alberth (2013). Body Techniques of Vulnerability: The Generational Order and the Body in Child Protection Services. Human Studies 36 (1):67-88.score: 108.0
    The paper seeks to analyze children’s bodily vulnerability as grounded in generational order. The thesis is put forward, that the generational order is embodied via body techniques of vulnerability, deployed both by adults and children. In presenting results from research on professional responses to child maltreatment and neglect, three sets of age related body techniques of vulnerability are identified, concerning caregivers, professionals and the children itself.
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  4. Bertrand P. Helm (1981). Value Strata Underlying Child Maltreatment: A Philosophical Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 15 (3):199-212.score: 90.0
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  5. Heledd Hart & Katya Rubia (2012). Neuroimaging of Child Abuse: A Critical Review. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 90.0
    Childhood maltreatment is a severe stressor that can lead to the development of behaviour problems and affect brain structure and function. This review summarizes the current evidence for the effects of early childhood maltreatment on behavior, cognition and the brain in adults and children. Neuropsychological studies suggest an association between child abuse and deficits in IQ, memory, executive function and emotion discrimination. Structural neuroimaging studies provide evidence for deficits in brain volume, grey and white matter of several (...)
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  6. Keith Bauer (2004). Covert Video Surveillance of Parents Suspected of Child Abuse: The British Experience and Alternative Approaches. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (4):311-327.score: 60.0
    One million cases of child maltreatment and twelve hundred child deaths due to abuse and neglect occur per year. But since many cases of abuse and neglect remain either unreported or unsubstantiated due to insufficient evidence, the number of children who are abused, neglected, and killed at the hands of family caregivers is probably higher. One approach to combat child abuse in the U.K. has been the employment of hospital-based covert video surveillance (CVS) to monitor parents (...)
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  7. Benjamin H. Levi & Sharon G. Portwood (2011). Reasonable Suspicion of Child Abuse: Finding a Common Language. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (1):62-69.score: 48.0
    In the United States, the implementation of a successful system of mandated reporting of suspected child abuse continues to be plagued by the absence of a clear standard for when one must report. All 50 states of the U.S. have laws requiring certain individuals to report suspected child abuse. However, at present, there are variable thresholds for mandated reporting and no clear consensus on how existing thresholds should be interpreted. Because “child abuse” is often present as a (...)
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  8. Robert L. Burgess & Alicia A. Drais (1999). Beyond the “Cinderella Effect”. Human Nature 10 (4):373-398.score: 42.0
    A central thesis of this paper is that understanding the nature of child maltreatment is so complex that no one disciplinary specialty is likely to be sufficient for the task. Although life history theory is the guiding principle for our analysis, we argue that an evolutionary explanation adds precision by incorporating empirical findings originating from the fields of anthropology; clinical, developmental, and social psychology; and sociology. Although evolutionary accounts of child maltreatment have been largely limited to (...)
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  9. Robert L. Burgess (1994). The Family in a Changing World. Human Nature 5 (2):203-221.score: 30.0
    Increasing numbers of young mothers in the work force, more and more children requiring extrafamilial care, high rates of divorce, lower rates of remarriage, increasing numbers of female-headed households, growing numbers of zero-parent families, and significant occurrences of child maltreatment are just some of the social indicators indicative of the family in a changing world. These trends and their consequences for children are described and then examined from the perspectives of microeconomic theory, the relative-income hypothesis, sex-ratio theory, and (...)
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  10. Carol van Nijnatten (2010). Children's Agency, Children's Welfare: A Dialogical Approach to Child Development, Policy and Practice. Policy Press.score: 18.0
    Contributing to current debates about child welfare and child protection, this book provides a holistic view of how children develop agency, combining social, ...
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  11. Ans Kolk & Rob van Tuldere (2002). Child Labor and Multinational Conduct: A Comparison of International Business Andstakeholder Codes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 36 (3):291-301.score: 18.0
    Increasing attention to the issue of child labor has been reflected in codes of conduct that emerged in the past decade in particular. This paper examines the way in which multinationals, business associations, governmental and non-governmental organizations deal with child labor in their codes. With a standardized framework, it analyzes 55 codes drawn up by these different actors to influence firms external, societal behavior. The exploratory study helps to identify the main issues related to child labor and (...)
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  12. Stefan Ramaekers & Paul Smeyers (2008). Child Rearing: Passivity and Being Able to Go On. Wittgenstein on Shared Practices and Seeing Aspects. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (5):638-651.score: 18.0
    It is not uncommon to hear parents say in discussions they have with their children 'Look at it this way'. And called upon for their advice, counsellors too say something to adults with the significance of 'Try to see it like this'. The change of someone's perspective in the context of child rearing is the focus of this paper. Our interest in this lies not so much in giving an answer to the practical problems that are at stake, but (...)
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  13. Christina Schües & Christoph Rehmann-Sutter (2013). The Well- and Unwell-Being of a Child. Topoi 32 (2):197-205.score: 18.0
    The concept of the ‘well-being of the child’ (like the ‘child’s welfare’ and ‘best interests of the child’) has remained underdetermined in legal and ethical texts on the needs and rights of children. As a hypothetical construct that draws attention to the child’s long-term welfare, the well-being of the child is a broader concept than autonomy and happiness. This paper clarifies some conceptual issues of the well-being of the child from a philosophical point of (...)
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  14. Wilma C. Rossi, William Reynolds & Robert M. Nelson (2003). Child Assent and Parental Permission in Pediatric Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (2):131-148.score: 18.0
    Since children are considered incapable ofgiving informed consent to participate inresearch, regulations require that bothparental permission and the assent of thepotential child subject be obtained. Assent andpermission are uniquely bound together, eachserving a different purpose. Parentalpermission protects the child from assumingunreasonable risks. Assent demonstrates respectfor the child and his developing autonomy. Inorder to give meaningful assent, the child mustunderstand that procedures will be performed,voluntarily choose to undergo the procedures,and communicate this choice. Understanding theelements of informed consent (...)
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  15. Paul Smeyers (2008). Child-Rearing: On Government Intervention and the Discourse of Experts. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (6):719-738.score: 18.0
    For Kant, education was understood as the 'means' to become human—and that is to say, rational. For Rousseau by contrast, and the many child-centred educators that followed him, the adult world, far from representing reason, is essentially corrupt and given over to the superficialities of worldly vanity. On this view, the child, as a product of nature, is essentially good and will learn all she needs to know from experience. Both positions have their own problems, but beyond this (...)
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  16. Bill Wringe (2011). Cognitive Individualism and the Child as Scientist Program. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 42 (4):518-529.score: 18.0
    n this paper, I examine the charge that Gopnik and Meltzoff’s ‘Child as Scientist’ program, outlined and defended in their 1997 book Words, Thoughts and Theories is vitiated by a form of ‘cognitive individualism’ about science. Although this charge has often been leveled at Gopnik and Meltzoff’s work, it has rarely been developed in any detail. -/- I suggest that we should distinguish between two forms of cognitive individualism which I refer to as ‘ontic’ and ‘epistemic’ cognitive individualism (OCI (...)
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  17. Juliet Tizzard (2004). Sex Selection, Child Welfare and Risk: A Critique of the HFEA's Recommendations on Sex Selection. Health Care Analysis 12 (1):61-68.score: 18.0
    This paper will examine the recent Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority public consultation on sex selection. It will review the current regulation on sex selection in the United Kingdom and critically examine the outcomes of the HFEA consultation. The paper will argue that the current ban on embryo sex selection for social reasons and a proposed ban on sperm selection are not justified. There is no evidence for sex selection causing an increase in sex discrimination; creating a slippery slope towards (...)
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  18. Barbara Stumper, Colin Bannard, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello (2011). “Frequent Frames” in German Child-Directed Speech: A Limited Cue to Grammatical Categories. Cognitive Science 35 (6):1190-1205.score: 18.0
    Mintz (2003) found that in English child-directed speech, frequently occurring frames formed by linking the preceding (A) and succeeding (B) word (A_x_B) could accurately predict the syntactic category of the intervening word (x). This has been successfully extended to French (Chemla, Mintz, Bernal, & Christophe, 2009). In this paper, we show that, as for Dutch (Erkelens, 2009), frequent frames in German do not enable such accurate lexical categorization. This can be explained by the characteristics of German including a less (...)
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  19. John Harris (2000). The Welfare of the Child. Health Care Analysis 8 (1):27-34.score: 18.0
    The interests or welfare of the child are rightly central to anydiscussion of the ethics of reproduction. The problematic nature of thislegitimate concern is seldom, if ever, noticed or if it is, it ismisunderstood. A prominent example of this sort of misunderstandingoccurs in the Department of Health's recent and important `SurrogacyReview' chaired by Margaret Brazier (The Brazier Report) and thesame misunderstanding makes nonsense of at least one provision of theHuman Fertilization and Embryology Act 1990. (The HFE Act).This paper explores (...)
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  20. Michael Peters (2001). Wittgensteinian Pedagogics: Cavell on the Figure of the Child in the Investigations. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (2):125-138.score: 18.0
    This paper discusses Stanley Cavell's approach to the Investigations,focusing upon his essay – `Notes and Afterthoughts on the Opening ofWittgenstein's Investigations'. First, the paper investigates the waysin which Cavell makes central the figure and `voice' of the child to hisreading of the opening of the Investigations. Second, it argues thatCavell's Notes provides a basis for a Wittgensteinian pedagogics,for not only does it hold up the figure of the child as central to the Investigations but it does so in (...)
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  21. Damian H. Adams (2013). Conceptualising a Child-Centric Paradigm. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):369-381.score: 18.0
    Since its inception, donor conception practices have been a reproductive choice for the infertile. Past and current practices have the potential to cause significant and lifelong harm to the offspring through loss of kinship, heritage, identity, and family health history, and possibly through introducing physical problems. Legislation and regulation in Australia that specifies that the welfare of the child born as a consequence of donor conception is paramount may therefore be in conflict with the outcomes. Altering the paradigm to (...)
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  22. Bernadette Baker (2003). Plato's Child and the Limit-Points of Educational Theories. Studies in Philosophy and Education 22 (6):439-474.score: 18.0
    This paper analyzes how the figure of the childhas been used to authorize a series ofboundaries that have constituted thelimit-points of educational theories orphilosophies. Limit-points are the conceptualboundaries that educational theories produce,move within, respond to, and make use ofbecause the perception is that they cannot beargued away or around at the time. A method ofcomparative historico-philosophy is used tocontrast limit-points in Platonic figurationsof the child and education with childcenteredand eugenic theories of the late nineteenth andtwentieth century West. The figuration (...)
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  23. Marion Thomas (2005). Are Animals Just Noisy Machines?: Louis Boutan and the Co-Invention of Animal and Child Psychology in the French Third Republic. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):425 - 460.score: 18.0
    Historians of science have only just begun to sample the wealth of different approaches to the study of animal behavior undertaken in the twentieth century. To date, more attention has been given to Lorenzian ethology and American behaviorism than to other work and traditions, but different approaches are equally worthy of the historian's attention, reflecting not only the broader range of questions that could be asked about animal behavior and the "animal mind" but also the different contexts in which these (...)
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  24. A. Magdalena Hurtado, Kim Hill, Ines Hurtado & Hillard Kaplan (1992). Trade-Offs Between Female Food Acquisition and Child Care Among Hiwi and Ache Foragers. Human Nature 3 (3):185-216.score: 18.0
    Even though female food acquisition is an area of considerable interest in hunter-gatherer research, the ecological determinants of women’s economic decisions in these populations are still poorly understood. The literature on female foraging behavior indicates that there is considerable variation within and across foraging societies in the amount of time that women spend foraging and in the amount and types of food that they acquire. It is possible that this heterogeneity reflects variation in the trade-offs between time spent in food (...)
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  25. Tamas Bereczkei & Andras Csanaky (1996). Evolutionary Pathway of Child Development. Human Nature 7 (3):257-280.score: 18.0
    An evolutionary theory of socialization suggests that children from father-absent families will mature earlier, and form less-stable pair bonds, compared with those from father-present families. Using a sample of about 1,000 persons the recent study focuses on elements of father-absent children’s behavior that could be better explained by a Darwinian approach than by rival social science theories. As a result of their enhanced interest in male competition, father-absent boys were found to engage in rule-breaking behavior more intensively than father-present boys. (...)
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  26. Inga Kudinavičiūtė-Michailovienė & Jolanta Vėgelienė (2012). Child Maintenance: Several Topical Theoretical and Practical Aspects. Jurisprudence 19 (1):209-229.score: 18.0
    The Constitution of the Republic of Lithuania1 determines that both parents have to maintain their minors, while the state has to establish conditions under which parents would be able to do their duties, i.e. undertakes responsibility to maintain the children who lack the maintenance from their parents. Latter obligations are concretized in the Civil Code of the Republic of Lithuania2 (3.192–3.204 art.). It also anticipates the principles under which the child’s maintenance should be provided, its forms, size criteria and (...)
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  27. Susan G. Sterrett (2012). Bringing Up Turing's 'Child-Machine'. In S. Barry Cooper (ed.), How the World Computes. 703--713.score: 18.0
    Turing wrote that the “guiding principle” of his investigation into the possibility of intelligent machinery was “The analogy [of machinery that might be made to show intelligent behavior] with the human brain.” [10] In his discussion of the investigations that Turing said were guided by this analogy, however, he employs a more far-reaching analogy: he eventually expands the analogy from the human brain out to “the human community as a whole.” Along the way, he takes note of an obvious fact (...)
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  28. Jacinta O. A. Tan & Jorg M. Fegert (2004). Capacity and Competence in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Health Care Analysis 12 (4):285-294.score: 18.0
    Capacity and competence in the field of child and adolescent psychiatry are complex issues, because of the many different influences that are involved in how children and adolescents make treatment decisions within the setting of mental health. This article will examine some of the influences which must be considered, namely: developmental aspects, the paradoxical relationship between the need for autonomy and participation and the capacity of children, family psychiatry, and the duty of care towards children and adolescents. The legal (...)
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  29. Daniel Yurovsky, Chen Yu & Linda B. Smith (2012). Statistical Speech Segmentation and Word Learning in Parallel: Scaffolding From Child-Directed Speech. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    In order to acquire their native languages, children must learn richly structured systems with regularities at multiple levels. While structure at different levels could be learned serially, e.g. speech segmentation coming before word-object mapping, redundancies across levels make parallel learning more efficient. For instance, a series of syllables is likely to be a word not only because of high transitional probabilities, but also because of a consistently co-occurring object. But additional statistics require additional processing, and thus might not be useful (...)
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  30. Timothy Adair (2009). Unmet Need for Contraception Among HIV-Positive Women in Lesotho and Implications for Mother-to-Child Transmission. Journal of Biosocial Science 41 (2):269-278.score: 18.0
    In Lesotho, the risk of mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of HIV is substantial; women of childbearing age have a high HIV prevalence rate (26·4%), low knowledge of HIV status and a total fertility rate of 3·5 births per woman. An effective means of preventing MTCT is to reduce unwanted fertility. This paper examines the unmet need for contraception to limit and space births among HIV-positive women in Lesotho aged 15–49 years, using the 2004 Lesotho Demographic and Health Survey. HIV-positive women have (...)
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  31. Linas Žalnieriūnas & Tomas Girdenis (2013). Problematic Qualification Aspects of the Avoidance to Maintain a Child and Alternative Ways of Child Maintenance. Jurisprudence 20 (2):707-724.score: 18.0
    The article analyzes one of the fundamental rights – the right to maintenance, which proper implementation ensures normal development of the child. This right matches with the duty of parents to maintain their minor children. Paragraph 6 of Article 38 of the Constitution of the Republic of Lithuania states that parents have a duty to educate their children to be honest people and loyal citizens, supporting them until adulthood. The obligation to maintain children is established in the first 3.192 (...)
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  32. Jeffrey Blustein (2012). Doing the Best for One's Child: Satisficing Versus Optimizing Parentalism. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (3):199-205.score: 18.0
    The maxim “parents should do what is in the best interests of their child” seems like an unassailable truth, and yet, as I argue here, there are serious problems with it when it is taken seriously. One problem concerns the sort of demands such a principle places on parents; the other concerns its larger social implications when conceived as part of a national policy for the rearing of children. The theory of parenting that creates these problems I call “optimizing (...)
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  33. Linda J. Graham (2008). Child-Rearing Inc.: On the Perils of Political Paralysis Down Under. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (6):739-746.score: 18.0
    In his 2007 PESA keynote address, Paul Smeyers discussed the increasing regulation of child-rearing through government intervention and the generation of 'experts', citing particular examples from Europe where cases of childhood obesity and parental neglect have stirred public opinion and political debate. In his paper ('Child-Rearing: On government intervention and the discourse of experts', this issue), Smeyers touches on a number of tensions before concluding that child-rearing qualifies as a practice in which liberal governments should be reluctant (...)
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  34. Rasheda Khanam & Mohammad Mafizur Rahman (2007). Child Work and Schooling in Bangladesh: The Role of Birth Order. Journal of Biosocial Science 39 (5):641-656.score: 18.0
    Using data from Bangladesh, this paper examines how the birth order of a child influences parental decisions to place children in one of four activities: 'study only', 'study and work', 'neither work nor study' and 'work only'. The results of the multinomial logit model show that being a first-born child increases the probability of work as the prime activity, or at least a combination of school and work, rather than schooling only. The results confirm that later-born children are (...)
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  35. Fiona E. Raitt & M. Suzanne Zeedyk (2004). Mothers on Trial: Discourses of Cot Death and Munchausen's Syndrome by Proxy. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 12 (3):257-278.score: 18.0
    This article explores some of the issues raised by Munchausen’s Syndrome by Proxy (MSbP) and the relationship between medicine and law, specifically the discourses which feature in the courtroom portraying motherhood and expectations of parenting. These discourses are often hidden yet play a determining role in prosecutions for alleged maltreatment of children involving medically unexplained infant death syndrome. We offer a critique of MSbP and seek to unveil the assumptions about mothers, the parent predominantly affected by the ‘diagnosis’, and (...)
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  36. Janet Cotterill (2011). Mugshots and Motherhood: The Media Semiotics of Vilification in Child Abduction Cases. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (4):447-470.score: 18.0
    The Shannon Matthews case was perhaps unique in British criminal history. For a period of several days, a young girl of 9 years of age was missing from home. During this period there was an unprecedented amount of both police and media attention devoted to the case, including TV appeals for her safe return and offers of financial rewards for information leading to her recovery. Ultimately, it emerged that the mother of the child had conspired with the child’s (...)
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  37. Martin Daly & Gretchen Perry (2011). Has the Child Welfare Profession Discovered Nepotistic Biases? Human Nature 22 (3):350-369.score: 18.0
    A major trend in foster care in developed countries over the past quarter century has been a shift toward placing children with “kin” rather than with unrelated foster parents. This change in practice is widely backed by legislation and is routinely justified as being in the best interests of the child. It is tempting to interpret this change as indicating that the child welfare profession has belatedly discovered that human social sentiments are nepotistic in their design, such that (...)
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  38. Richard J. Gelles (1991). Physical Violence, Child Abuse, and Child Homicide. Human Nature 2 (1):59-72.score: 18.0
    The study of child abuse and child homicide has been based on the often implicit assumption that there is a continuum of violence ranging from mild physical punishment to severe abuse and homicide. Empirical data supporting this assumption are sparse. Existing data can be shown, however, to support an assumption that there are distinct forms of violence, not a continuum. This paper reviews these data and discusses their implications for the study of violence, abuse, and homicide in terms (...)
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  39. Munmun Jha (2009). Child Workers in India: Context and Complexities. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 10 (2):205-218.score: 18.0
    This paper portrays the nature of child workers in India and seeks to understand its many complexities. It looks at the definition of child labour, the extent of its prevalence, the reasons why children work, and the occupations they are engaged in. It outlines India’s position on international obligations, its expanding domestic laws, and the tardy implementation of these laws. It examines some of the inherent cultural constraints and the role of values and beliefs in perpetuating child (...)
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  40. Rebecca Sear (2008). Kin and Child Survival in Rural Malawi. Human Nature 19 (3):277-293.score: 18.0
    This paper investigates the impact of kin on child survival in a matrilineal society in Malawi. Women usually live in close proximity to their matrilineal kin in this agricultural community, allowing opportunities for helping behavior between matrilineal relatives. However, there is little evidence that matrilineal kin are beneficial to children. On the contrary, child mortality rates appear to be higher in the presence of maternal grandmothers and maternal aunts. These effects are modified by the sex of child (...)
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  41. Talia Welsh (2013). The Child as Natural Phenomenologist: Primal and Primary Experience in Merleau-Ponty's Psychology. Northwestern University Press.score: 18.0
    Early work in child psychology -- Phenomenology, gestalt theory, and psychoanalysis -- Syncretic sociability and the birth of the self -- Contemporary research in psychology and phenomenology -- Exploration and learning -- Culture, development, and gender -- Conclusion: an incomparable childhood.
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  42. Elizabeth Brake (2005). Fatherhood and Child Support: Do Men Have a Right to Choose? Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (1):55–73.score: 15.0
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  43. Tim Crane (1997). Reply to Child. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 97 (1):103-108.score: 15.0
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  44. Eva M. Simms (2008). The Child in the World: Embodiment, Time, and Language in Early Childhood. Wayne State University Press.score: 15.0
    Illuminates childrens experiences of embodiment, inter-subjectivity, place, thing, time, and language through a dialogue between developmental research and ...
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  45. Talia Welsh (2007). Child's Play: Anatomically Correct Dolls and Embodiment. [REVIEW] Human Studies 30 (3):255 - 267.score: 15.0
    Anatomically detailed dolls have been used to elicit testimony from children in sex abuse cases. However, studies have shown they often provide false accounts in young, preschool-age children. Typically this problem is seen as a cognitive one: with age, children can correctly map their bodies onto a doll due to greater intellectual ability to represent themselves. I argue, along with the work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, that although cognitive developments aid in the ability to represent one’s own body, a discussion of (...)
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  46. Karin Murris (2013). The Epistemic Challenge of Hearing Child's Voice. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (3):245-259.score: 15.0
  47. Eugene M. DeRobertis (2011). Prolegomena to a Thomistic Child Psychology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 31 (3):151-164.score: 15.0
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  48. Eugene M. DeRobertis (2011). William Stern: Forerunner of Human Science Child Developmental Thought. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 42 (2):157-173.score: 15.0
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  49. Anna Luise Kirkengen (2008). Inscriptions of Violence: Societal and Medical Neglect of Child Abuse – Impact on Life and Health. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):99-110.score: 15.0
    ObjectiveA sickness history from General Practice will be unfolded with regard to its implicit lived meanings. This experiential matrix will be analyzed with regard to its medico-theoretical aspects.MethodThe analysis is grounded in a phenomenology of the body. The patient Katherine Kaplan lends a particular portrait to the dynamics that are enacted in the interface between socially silenced domestic violence and the theoretical assumptions of human health as these inform the clinical practice of health care.ResultsBy applying an understanding of sickness that (...)
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  50. David Rosen (2010). Review of Child Soldiers: From Violence to Protection. [REVIEW] Studies in Social Justice 4 (1):93-95.score: 15.0
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