Results for 'Meghan Riling'

134 found
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  1. Time Biases: A Theory of Rational Planning and Personal Persistence.Meghan Sullivan - 2018 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Should you care less about your distant future? What about events in your life that have already happened? How should the passage of time affect your planning and assessment of your life? Most of us think it is irrational to ignore the future but harmless to dismiss the past. But this book argues that rationality requires temporal neutrality.
     
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  2. The Minimal A-Theory.Meghan Sullivan - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 158 (2):149-174.
    Timothy Williamson thinks that every object is a necessary, eternal existent. In defense of his view, Williamson appeals primarily to considerations from modal and tense logic. While I am uncertain about his modal claims, I think there are good metaphysical reasons to believe permanentism: the principle that everything always exists. B-theorists of time and change have long denied that objects change with respect to unqualified existence. But aside from Williamson, nearly all A-theorists defend temporaryism: the principle that there are temporary (...)
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  3.  13
    Why Agent-Caused Actions Are Not Lucky.Meghan Griffith - 2010 - American Philosophical Quarterly 47 (1):43-56.
    Philosophers like to worry about luck. And well they should. Luck poses potential difficulties for knowledge, moral appraisal, and freedom. The primary target of this paper will be the last of these concerns . Recent arguments from luck have been levied against libertarian accounts of free will, including agent-causal ones. One general goal of this paper will be to demonstrate the truth of an often overlooked claim about responsibility-undermining luck. Part of this task will include illustrating what is genuinely worrisome (...)
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  4. Questions, Answers, and Knowledge- Wh.Meghan Masto - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 147 (3):395-413.
    Various authors have attempted to understand knowledge-wh—or knowledge ascriptions that include an interrogative complement. I present and explain some of the analyses offered so far and argue that each view faces some problems. I then present and explain a newanalysis of knowledge-wh that avoids these problems and that offers several other advantages. Finally I raise some problems for invariantism about knowledge-wh and I argue thatcontextualism about knowledge-wh fits nicely with a very natural understanding of the nature of questions.
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  5. Empathy and Its Role in Morality.Meghan Masto - 2015 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):74-96.
    In this paper, I will argue, contra Prinz, that empathy is a crucial component of our moral lives. In particular, I argue that empathy is sometimes epistemologically necessary for identifying the right action; that empathy is sometimes psychologically necessary for motivating the agent to perform the right action; and that empathy is sometimes necessary for the agent to be most morally praiseworthy for an action. I begin by explaining what I take empathy to be. I then discuss some alleged problems (...)
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  6. Does Free Will Remain a Mystery? A Response to Van Inwagen.Meghan Elizabeth Griffith - 2005 - Philosophical Studies 124 (3):261-269.
    In this paper, I argue against Peter van Inwagen’s claim (in “Free Will Remains a Mystery”), that agent-causal views of free will could do nothing to solve the problem of free will (specifically, the problem of chanciness). After explaining van Inwagen’s argument, I argue that he does not consider all possible manifestations of the agent-causal position. More importantly, I claim that, in any case, van Inwagen appears to have mischaracterized the problem in some crucial ways. Once we are clear on (...)
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  7.  42
    The Problem of Denizenship: A Non-Domination Framework.Meghan Benton - 2014 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 17 (1):49-69.
  8.  5
    Perception of Speech Reflects Optimal Use of Probabilistic Speech Cues.Meghan Clayards, Michael K. Tanenhaus, Richard N. Aslin & Robert A. Jacobs - 2008 - Cognition 108 (3):804-809.
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  9.  17
    Perception of Speech Reflects Optimal Use of Probabilistic Speech Cues.Robert A. Jacobs Meghan Clayards, Michael K. Tanenhaus, Richard N. Aslin - 2008 - Cognition 108 (3):804.
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  10.  17
    Simulating Other People Changes the Self.Meghan L. Meyer, Zidong Zhao & Diana I. Tamir - forthcoming - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General.
  11.  67
    An A-Theory Without Tense Operators.Meghan Sullivan - 2016 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 46 (4-5):735-758.
    A-theorists think there is a fundamental difference between the present and other times. This concern shows up in what kinds of properties they take to be instantiated, what objects they think exist and how they formalize their views. Nearly every contemporary A-theorist assumes that her metaphysics requires a tense logic – a logic with operators like and. In this paper, I show that there is at least one viable A-theory that does not require a logic with tense operators. And I (...)
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  12.  12
    Safety Culture in Financial Trading: An Analysis of Trading Misconduct Investigations.Meghan P. Leaver & Tom W. Reader - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (2):461-481.
    High-profile failures in financial trading have led to interest in how the culture of the industry produces risky and unethical behaviours among traders. Yet, there is no established theoretical framework for studying this: we apply safety culture theory to examine ten recent high-profile trading mishaps investigated by the UK financial regulator. The results show that the dimensions of safety culture used to understand organisational accidents in domains such as aviation also explain failures in Risk Management within financial trading organisations. This (...)
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  13.  12
    The Joint Effects of Justice Climate, Group Moral Identity, and Corporate Social Responsibility on the Prosocial and Deviant Behaviors of Groups.Meghan A. Thornton & Deborah E. Rupp - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (4):677-697.
    Pulling from theories of social exchange, deonance, and fairness heuristics, this study focuses on the relationship between overall justice climate and both the prosocial and deviant behaviors of groups. Specifically, it considers two contextual boundary conditions on this effect—corporate social responsibility and group moral identity. Results from a laboratory experiment are presented, which show a significant effect for overall justice climate and a two-way interaction between overall justice climate and CSR on group-level prosocial and deviant behaviors, and a marginally significant (...)
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  14.  12
    Incidental Regulation of Attraction: The Neural Basis of the Derogation of Attractive Alternatives in Romantic Relationships.Meghan L. Meyer, Elliot T. Berkman, Johan C. Karremans & Matthew D. Lieberman - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (3):490-505.
  15.  63
    The Tyranny of the Enfranchised Majority? The Accountability of States to Their Non-Citizen Population.Meghan Benton - 2010 - Res Publica 16 (4):397-413.
    The debate between legal constitutionalists and critics of constitutional rights and judicial review is an old and lively one. While the protection of minorities is a pivotal aspect of this debate, the protection of disenfranchised minorities has received little attention. Policy-focused discussion—of the merits of the Human Rights Act in Britain for example—often cites protection of non-citizen migrants, but the philosophical debate does not. Non-citizen residents or ‘denizens’ therefore provide an interesting test case for the theory of rights as trumps (...)
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  16. Problems for Temporary Existence in Tense Logic.Meghan Sullivan - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (1):43-57.
    A‐theorists of time postulate a deep distinction between the present, past and future. Settling on an appropriate logic for such a view is no easy matter. This Philosophy Compass article describes one of the most vexing formal problems facing A‐theorists. It is commonly thought that A‐theories can only be formally expressed in a tense logic: a logic with operators like P and F . And it seems natural to think that we live in a world where objects come to exist (...)
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  17. Change We Can Believe In (and Assert).Meghan Sullivan - 2014 - Noûs 48 (3):474-495.
  18.  66
    The A-Theory: A Theory.Meghan Sullivan - 2011 - Dissertation, Rutgers University - New Brunswick
    A-theories of time postulate a fundamental distinction between the present and other times. This distinction manifests in what A-theorists take to exist, their accounts of property change, and their views about the appropriate temporal logic. In this dissertation, I argue for a particular formulation of the A-theory that dispenses with change in existence and makes tense operators an optional formal tool for expressing the key theses. I call my view the minimal A-theory. The first chapter introduces the debate. The second (...)
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  19.  41
    Personal Volatility.Meghan Sullivan - 2017 - Philosophical Issues 27 (1):343-363.
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  20.  66
    Modal Logic as Methodology.Meghan Sullivan - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (3):734-743.
  21.  27
    The Social Weight of Spoken Words.Meghan Sumner - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (5):238-239.
  22. Freedom and Trying: Understanding Agent-Causal Exertions. [REVIEW]Meghan Griffith - 2007 - Acta Analytica 22 (1):16-28.
    In this paper, I argue that trying is the locus of freedom and moral responsibility. Thus, any plausible view of free and responsible action must accommodate and account for free tryings. I then consider a version of agent causation whereby the agent directly causes her tryings. On this view, the agent is afforded direct control over her efforts and there is no need to posit—as other agent-causal theorists do—an uncaused event. I discuss the potential advantages of this sort of view, (...)
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  23.  19
    Upbeat and Happy: Arousal as an Important Factor in Studying Attention.Meghan M. McConnell & David I. Shore - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (7):1184-1195.
  24. Against Time Bias.Preston Greene & Meghan Sullivan - 2015 - Ethics 125 (4):947-970.
    Most of us display a bias toward the near: we prefer pleasurable experiences to be in our near future and painful experiences to be in our distant future. We also display a bias toward the future: we prefer pleasurable experiences to be in our future and painful experiences to be in our past. While philosophers have tended to think that near bias is a rational defect, almost no one finds future bias objectionable. In this essay, we argue that this hybrid (...)
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  25.  39
    The Role of Variation in the Perception of Accented Speech.Meghan Sumner - 2011 - Cognition 119 (1):131-136.
  26. Semantics for Blasphemy.Meghan Sullivan - 2012 - In Jonathan L. Kvanvig (ed.), Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion, Vol. IV. Oxford University Press.
    Use of divine names is strictly regulated in the three Abrahamic faiths: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Unlike most ordinary names, “God,” “Jesus,” and “Allah,” have a particular moral significance for the faithful. Misuse of the names constitutes a form of blasphemy—a sin. Tomes have been written about the origin of holy names in these traditions and the role that they play in devotional practices. I have no such grand theological ambitions here. Instead, in this short essay I will raise a (...)
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  27.  23
    Social Working Memory: Neurocognitive Networks and Directions for Future Research.Meghan L. Meyer & Matthew D. Lieberman - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
  28.  60
    Who Engages with Moral Beauty?Rhett Diessner, Ravi Iyer, Meghan M. Smith & Jonathan Haidt - 2013 - Journal of Moral Education 42 (2):139-163.
    Aristotle considered moral beauty to be the telos of the human virtues. Displays of moral beauty have been shown to elicit the moral emotion of elevation and cause a desire to become a better person and to engage in prosocial behavior. Study 1 (N = 5380) shows engagement with moral beauty is related to several psychological constructs relevant to moral education, and structural models reveal that the story of engagement with moral beauty may be considered a story of love and (...)
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  29.  65
    Free Will: The Basics.Meghan Griffith - 2013 - Routledge.
    The question of whether humans are free to make their own decisions has long been debated and it continues to be a controversial topic today. In _Free Will: The Basics_ readers are provided with a clear and accessible introduction to this central but challenging philosophical problem. The questions which are discussed include: Does free will exist? Or is it illusory? Can we be free even if everything is determined by a chain of causes? If our actions are not determined, does (...)
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  30.  19
    Currents in Contemporary Ethics.Meghan K. Talbott - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (2):316-319.
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  31.  49
    Based on a True Story: Narrative and the Value of Acting Freely.Meghan Griffith - 2011 - Social Theory and Practice 37 (1):19-34.
    In several essays, John Fischer motivates his guidance control view of moral responsibility by discussing the value of acting freely. What we value, he argues, is unhindered self-expression that derives its meaning from a narrative structure. In this paper, I claim that while Fischer may be correct that self-expression is the value of acting freely, it is less clear that the kind of self-expression that we value sits comfortably with determinism. The meaning of one’s narrative may include the accuracy of (...)
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  32.  63
    Examining the Effectiveness of Climate Change Frames in the Face of a Climate Change Denial Counter‐Frame.Aaron M. McCright, Meghan Charters, Katherine Dentzman & Thomas Dietz - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):76-97.
    Prior research on the influence of various ways of framing anthropogenic climate change do not account for the organized ACC denial in the U.S. media and popular culture, and thus may overestimate these frames' influence in the general public. We conducted an experiment to examine how Americans' ACC views are influenced by four promising frames for urging action on ACC —when these frames appear with an ACC denial counter-frame. This is the first direct test of how exposure to an ACC (...)
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  33.  13
    Verb Aspect and Problem Solving.Meghan M. Salomon, Joseph P. Magliano & Gabriel A. Radvansky - 2013 - Cognition 128 (2):134-139.
  34.  14
    Love of God and Neighbor: Living Charity in Aquinas’ Ethics.Meghan J. Clark - 2011 - New Blackfriars 92 (1040):415-430.
  35.  19
    Reasoned Agreement Versus Practical Reasonableness: Grounding Human Rights in Maritain and Rawls.Meghan J. Clark - 2012 - Heythrop Journal 53 (4):637-648.
  36.  13
    Compelled Authorizations for Disclosure of Health Records: Magnitude and Implications.Mark A. Rothstein & Meghan K. Talbott - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (3):38 – 45.
    Each year individuals are required to execute millions of authorizations for the release of their health records as a condition of employment, applying for various types of insurance, and submitting claims for benefits. Generally, there are no restrictions on the scope of information released pursuant to these compelled authorizations, and the development of a nationwide system of interoperable electronic health records will increase the amount of health information released. After quantifying the extent of these disclosures, this article discusses why it (...)
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  37.  40
    Collective Virtue.T. Ryan Byerly & Meghan Byerly - 2016 - Journal of Value Inquiry 50 (1):33-50.
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  38.  62
    Beyond Consent: Building Trusting Relationships With Diverse Populations in Precision Medicine Research.Stephanie A. Kraft, Mildred K. Cho, Katherine Gillespie, Meghan Halley, Nina Varsava, Kelly E. Ormond, Harold S. Luft, Benjamin S. Wilfond & Sandra Soo-Jin Lee - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (4):3-20.
    With the growth of precision medicine research on health data and biospecimens, research institutions will need to build and maintain long-term, trusting relationships with patient-participants. While trust is important for all research relationships, the longitudinal nature of precision medicine research raises particular challenges for facilitating trust when the specifics of future studies are unknown. Based on focus groups with racially and ethnically diverse patients, we describe several factors that influence patient trust and potential institutional approaches to building trustworthiness. Drawing on (...)
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  39.  3
    Resistance Will Be Futile? The Stigmatization (or Not) of Whistleblowers.Meghan Van Portfliet - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-14.
    Does speaking up ruin one’s life? Organizational and whistleblowing research largely accept that “whistleblower” is a negative label that effects one’s well-being. Whistleblowing research also emphasizes the drawn-out process of speaking up. The result is a narrative of the whistleblower as someone who suffers indefinitely. In this paper, I draw on theories of stigma, labelling, and identity, specifically stigmatized identity, to provide a more nuanced understanding of whistleblower stigma as relational and temporary. I analyse two cases of whistleblowing, one where (...)
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  40.  15
    The Expanding Use of DNA in Law Enforcement: What Role for Privacy?Mark A. Rothstein & Meghan K. Talbott - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (2):153-164.
    DNA identification methods are such an established part of our law enforcement and criminal justice systems it is hard to believe that the technologies were developed as recently as the mid-1980s, and that the databases of law enforcement profiles were established in the 1990s. Although the first databases were limited to the DNA profiles of convicted rapists and murderers, the success of these databases in solving violent crimes provided the impetus for Congress and state legislatures to expand the scope of (...)
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  41.  35
    The Criminal Justice System Creates Incentives for False Convictions.Roger Koppl & Meghan Sacks - 2013 - Criminal Justice Ethics 32 (2):126-162.
    The American criminal justice system creates incentives for false conviction. For example, many public crime labs are funded in part per conviction. We show that the number of false convictions per year in the American criminal justice system should be considered ?high.? We examine the incentives of police, forensic scientists, prosecutors, and public defenders in the U.S. Police, prosecutors, and forensic scientists often have an incentive to garner convictions with little incentive to convict the right person. These incentives create what (...)
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  42. Routledge Companion to Free Will.Kevin Timpe, Meghan Griffith & Neil Levy (eds.) - 2017 - New York: Routledge.
    Questions concerning free will are intertwined with issues in almost every area of philosophy, from metaphysics to philosophy of mind to moral philosophy, and are also informed by work in different areas of science. Free will is also a perennial concern of serious thinkers in theology and in non-western traditions. Because free will can be approached from so many different perspectives and has implications for so many debates, a comprehensive survey needs to encompass an enormous range of approaches. This book (...)
     
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  43.  4
    Compelled Disclosures of Health Records: Updated Estimates.Mark A. Rothstein & Meghan K. Talbott - 2017 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45 (1):149-155.
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  44.  23
    The Expanding Use of DNA in Law Enforcement: What Role for Privacy?Mark A. Rothstein & Meghan K. Talbott - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (2):153-164.
    DNA identification is being used in ever-widening ways, including databases of greater scope, familial and lowstringency searches, and DNA dragnets. After examining the law enforcement and privacy interests, the article concludes that forensic DNA uses must be consistent with privacy and civil liberties.
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  45.  73
    Yet Another “Epicurean” Argument.Peter Finocchiaro & Meghan Sullivan - 2016 - Philosophical Perspectives 30 (1):135-159.
    In this paper, we develop a novel version of the so-called Lucretian symmetry argument against the badness of death. Our argument has two features that make it particularly effective. First, it focuses on the preferences of rational agents. We believe the focus on preferences eliminates needless complications and emphasizes the urgency to respond to the argument. Second, our argument utilizes a principle that states that a rational agent's preferences should not vary in arbitrary ways. We argue that this principle underlies (...)
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  46.  52
    The Special Value of Others-Centeredness.T. Ryan Byerly & Meghan Byerly - 2016 - Res Philosophica 93 (1):63-78.
    Suppose you confront a situation in which you can either promote a good for yourself or a good for someone else, but not both. The present paper argues that it is valuable for your conduct in such circumstances to be regulated by a character trait the possession of which constitutes one way of having one’s life be centered upon others as opposed to centered upon oneself. The trait in question, which we shall call “others-centeredness,” is a disposition to promote goods (...)
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  47. Reducing Implicit Racial Preferences: II. Intervention Effectiveness Across Time.Calvin K. Lai, Allison L. Skinner, Erin Cooley, Sohad Murrar, Markus Brauer, Thierry Devos, Jimmy Calanchini, Y. Jenny Xiao, Christina Pedram, Christopher K. Marshburn, Stefanie Simon, John C. Blanchar, Jennifer A. Joy-Gaba, John Conway, Liz Redford, Rick A. Klein, Gina Roussos, Fabian M. H. Schellhaas, Mason Burns, Xiaoqing Hu, Meghan C. McLean, Jordan R. Axt, Shaki Asgari, Kathleen Schmidt, Rachel Rubinstein, Maddalena Marini, Sandro Rubichi, Jiyun-Elizabeth L. Shin & Brian A. Nosek - 2016 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145 (8):1001-1016.
  48.  9
    Against Time Bias.Preston Greene and Meghan Sullivan - 2015 - Ethics 125 (4):947-970,.
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  49.  1
    Systems of Pain/Networks of Resilience.Meghan Moe Beitiks & Katie Murphy - 2020 - World Futures 76 (5-7):375-382.
    Systems of Pain/Networks of Resilience is a transcript of a video, a chapter in an interdisciplinary research project. Artist Meghan Moe Beitiks interviewed people with personal or pro...
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  50.  63
    Validity Study Using Factor Analyses on the Defining Issues Test-2 in Undergraduate Populations.Youn-Jeng Choi, Hyemin Han, Meghan Bankhead & Stephen J. Thoma - 2020 - PLoS ONE 15 (8):e0238110.
    Introduction The Defining Issues Test (DIT) aimed to measure one’s moral judgment development in terms of moral reasoning. The Neo-Kohlbergian approach, which is an elaboration of Kohlbergian theory, focuses on the continuous development of postconventional moral reasoning, which constitutes the theoretical basis of the DIT. However, very few studies have directly tested the internal structure of the DIT, which would indicate its construct validity. Objectives Using the DIT-2, a later revision of the DIT, we examined whether a bi-factor model or (...)
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