Results for 'Object recognition'

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  1.  66
    Hierarchies, Similarity, and Interactivity in Object Recognition: “Category-Specific” Neuropsychological Deficits.Glyn W. Humphreys & Emer M. E. Forde - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):453-476.
    Category-specific impairments of object recognition and naming are among the most intriguing disorders in neuropsychology, affecting the retrieval of knowledge about either living or nonliving things. They can give us insight into the nature of our representations of objects: Have we evolved different neural systems for recognizing different categories of object? What kinds of knowledge are important for recognizing particular objects? How does visual similarity within a category influence object recognition and representation? What is the (...)
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  2.  57
    Orientation-Invariant Object Recognition: Evidence From Repetition Blindness.Irina M. Harris & Paul E. Dux - 2005 - Cognition 95 (1):73-93.
    The question of whether object recognition is orientation-invariant or orientation-dependent was investigated using a repetition blindness (RB) paradigm. In RB, the second occurrence of a repeated stimulus is less likely to be reported, compared to the occurrence of a different stimulus, if it occurs within a short time of the first presentation. This failure is usually interpreted as a difficulty in assigning two separate episodic tokens to the same visual type. Thus, RB can provide useful information about which (...)
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  3.  25
    On the Neural Correlates of Object Recognition Awareness: Relationship to Computational Activities and Activities Mediating Perceptual Awareness.Terence V. Sewards & Mark A. Sewards - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (1):51-77.
    Based on theoretical considerations of Aurell (1979) and Block (1995), we argue that object recognition awareness is distinct from purely sensory awareness and that the former is mediated by neuronal activities in areas that are separate and distinct from cortical sensory areas. We propose that two of the principal functions of neuronal activities in sensory cortex, which are to provide sensory awareness and to effect the computations that are necessary for object recognition, are dissociated. We provide (...)
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  4.  10
    The Development of Invariant Object Recognition Requires Visual Experience With Temporally Smooth Objects.Justin N. Wood & Samantha M. W. Wood - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (4):1391-1406.
    How do newborns learn to recognize objects? According to temporal learning models in computational neuroscience, the brain constructs object representations by extracting smoothly changing features from the environment. To date, however, it is unknown whether newborns depend on smoothly changing features to build invariant object representations. Here, we used an automated controlled-rearing method to examine whether visual experience with smoothly changing features facilitates the development of view-invariant object recognition in a newborn animal model—the domestic chick. When (...)
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  5.  10
    Learning to Be Variant: Combining Prior Knowledge and Experience to Infer Orientation Invariance in Object Recognition.L. Austerweil Joseph, L. Griffiths Thomas & E. Palmer Stephen - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S5):1183-1201.
    How does the visual system recognize images of a novel object after a single observation despite possible variations in the viewpoint of that object relative to the observer? One possibility is comparing the image with a prototype for invariance over a relevant transformation set. However, invariance over rotations has proven difficult to analyze, because it applies to some objects but not others. We propose that the invariant transformations of an object are learned by incorporating prior expectations with (...)
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  6.  20
    Object Recognition and Random Image Structure Evolution.Javid Sadr & Pawan Sinha - 2004 - Cognitive Science 28 (2):259-287.
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  7.  13
    Importance of Object Recognition in Size Constancy.Robert C. Bolles & Daniel E. Bailey - 1956 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 51 (3):222.
  8. The Relationship of Visual Masking and Basic Object Recognition in Healthy Observers and Patients with Schizophrenia.Michael H. Herzog - 2006 - In Gmen, Haluk; Breitmeyer, Bruno G. (2006). The First Half Second: The Microgenesis and Temporal Dynamics of Unconscious and Conscious Visual Processes. (Pp. 259-274). Cambridge, Ma, Us: Mit Press. Xi, 410 Pp.
     
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  9.  85
    Complex Cells and Object Recognition.Shimon Edelman - unknown
    Nearest-neighbor correlation-based similarity computation in the space of outputs of complex-type receptive elds can support robust recognition of 3D objects. Our experiments with four collections of objects resulted in mean recognition rates between 84% and 94%, over a 40 40 range of viewpoints, centered on a stored canonical view and related to it by rotations in depth. This result has interesting implications for the design of a front end to an arti cial object recognition system, and (...)
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  10.  67
    Object Recognition is Not Predication.Jean-Louis Dessalles & Laleh Ghadakpour - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):290-291.
    Predicates involved in language and reasoning are claimed to radically differ from categories applied to objects. Human predicates are the cognitive result of a contrast between perceived objects. Object recognition alone cannot generate such operations as modification and explicit negation. The mechanism studied by Hurford constitutes at best an evolutionary prerequisite of human predication ability.
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  11.  6
    How Do Animals Solve Object-Recognition Tasks?Dave G. Mumby - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):461-462.
    This commentary reviews recent evidence that some hippo- campal functions do not depend on perirhinal inputs and discusses how the multiple-process model of recognition may shed interpretive light on previous reports of DNMS reacquisition deficits in pretrained subjects with hippocampal damage. Suggestions are made for determining whether nonhuman subjects solve object-recognition tasks using recollective memory or familiarity judgments.
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  12.  4
    SiMOR: Single Moving Object Recognition.V. N. Manjunath Aradhya, D. R. Ramesh Babu, M. Ravishankar & M. T. Gopala Krishna - 2011 - Journal of Intelligent Systems 20 (1):33-45.
    Automatic moving object detection and tracking is very important task in video surveillance applications. In the present work the well known background subtraction model and use of Gaussian Mixture Models have been used to implement a robust automated single object tracking system. In this implementation, background subtraction on subtracting consecutive frame-by-frame basis for moving object detection is done. Once the object has been detected it is tracked by employing an efficient GMM technique. After successful completion of (...)
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  13.  61
    (Object Recognition/Multidimensional Scaling/Computational Model).Shimon Edelman - unknown
    differentiaily rated pairwise similarity when confronted with two pairs of objects, each revolving in a separate window on a computer screen. Subject data were pooled using individually weighted MDS (ref. 11; in all the experiments, the solutions were consistent among subjects). In each trial, the subject had to select among two pairs of shapes the one consisting of the most similar shapes. The subjects were allowed to respond at will; most responded within 10 sec. Proximity (that is, perceived similarity) tables (...)
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  14. Perception and Cognition: The Analysis of Object Recognition.Ulrike Pompe - 2011 - Mentis.
  15. Visual Agnosia: Disorders of Object Recognition and What They Tell Us About Normal Vision.Martha J. Farah - 1990 - MIT Press.
  16.  66
    The Role of Context in Object Recognition.Aude Oliva & Antonio Torralba - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (12):520-527.
  17.  63
    Visual Crowding: A Fundamental Limit on Conscious Perception and Object Recognition.David Whitney & Dennis M. Levi - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (4):160-168.
  18.  64
    Untangling Invariant Object Recognition.James J. DiCarlo & David D. Cox - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (8):333-341.
  19.  10
    Aligning Pictorial Descriptions: An Approach to Object Recognition.Shimon Ullman - 1989 - Cognition 32 (3):193-254.
  20.  5
    Early Recurrent Feedback Facilitates Visual Object Recognition Under Challenging Conditions.Dean Wyatte, David J. Jilk & Randall C. O'Reilly - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  21.  65
    Object Recognition and Segmentation by a Fragment-Based Hierarchy.Shimon Ullman - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (2):58-64.
  22.  14
    The Distinction Between Object Recognition and Picture Recognition.Hadyn D. Ellis - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (1):81-82.
  23. Observations on Cortical Mechanisms for Object Recognition and Learning.Tomaso Poggio & Anya Hurlbert - 1994 - In Christof Koch & J. Davis (eds.), Large-Scale Neuronal Theories of the Brain. MIT Press. pp. 153--182.
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  24. After the Viewpoint Debate: Where Next in Object Recognition?William G. Hayward - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (10):425-427.
  25.  6
    Recurrent Processing During Object Recognition.Randall C. O’Reilly, Dean Wyatte, Seth Herd, Brian Mingus & David J. Jilk - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
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  26.  6
    A Smoothness Constraint on the Development of Object Recognition.Justin N. Wood - 2016 - Cognition 153:140-145.
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  27.  6
    The Aesthetic Preference for Nature Sounds Depends on Sound Object Recognition.Stephen C. Van Hedger, Howard C. Nusbaum, Shannon L. M. Heald, Alex Huang, Hiroki P. Kotabe & Marc G. Berman - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (5):e12734.
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  28.  63
    How Position Dependent is Visual Object Recognition?Dwight J. Kravitz, Latrice D. Vinson & Chris I. Baker - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (3):114-122.
  29.  13
    Image-Based Object Recognition in Man, Monkey and Machine.Michael J. Tarr & Heinrich H. Bülthoff - 1998 - Cognition 67 (1-2):1-20.
  30.  5
    How and When? Metacognition and Solution Timing Characterize an “Aha” Experience of Object Recognition in Hidden Figures.Tetsuo Ishikawa, Mayumi Toshima & Ken Mogi - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  31.  87
    Computational Theories of Object Recognition.Shimon Edelman - 1997 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (8):296-304.
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  32.  11
    Three-Dimensional Object Recognition Based on the Combination of Views.Shimon Ullman - 1998 - Cognition 67 (1-2):21-44.
  33.  16
    Visual Appearance Interacts with Conceptual Knowledge in Object Recognition.Olivia S. Cheung & Isabel Gauthier - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  34.  13
    Object Recognition with Severe Spatial Deficits in Williams Syndrome: Sparing and Breakdown.Barbara Landau, James E. Hoffman & Nicole Kurz - 2006 - Cognition 100 (3):483-510.
  35.  3
    Error-Driven Learning in Visual Categorization and Object Recognition: A Common-Elements Model.Fabian A. Soto & Edward A. Wasserman - 2010 - Psychological Review 117 (2):349-381.
  36.  5
    Predicting Object Features Across Saccades: Evidence From Object Recognition and Visual Search.Arvid Herwig & Werner X. Schneider - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (5):1903-1922.
  37.  33
    Vision: Object Recognition.Michael Tarr - 2002 - In Lynn Nadel (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Macmillan.
  38. Where View-Based Theories of Human Object Recognition Break Down: The Role of Structure in Human Shape Perception.J. E. Hummel - 2000 - In Eric Dietrich Art Markman (ed.), Cognitive Dynamics: Conceptual Change in Humans and Machines. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 157--185.
     
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  39.  3
    Individual Differences in Object Recognition.Jennifer J. Richler, Andrew J. Tomarken, Mackenzie A. Sunday, Timothy J. Vickery, Kaitlin F. Ryan, R. Jackie Floyd, David Sheinberg, Alan C. -N. Wong & Isabel Gauthier - 2019 - Psychological Review 126 (2):226-251.
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  40.  8
    Mental Rotation and Orientation-Invariant Object Recognition: Dissociable Processes.Martha J. Farah & Katherine M. Hammond - 1988 - Cognition 29 (1):29-46.
  41.  19
    Dissociating the Effects of Angular Disparity and Image Similarity in Mental Rotation and Object Recognition.Olivia S. Cheung, William G. Hayward & Isabel Gauthier - 2009 - Cognition 113 (1):128-133.
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  42.  8
    Exploiting Core Knowledge for Visual Object Recognition.Mark W. Schurgin & Jonathan I. Flombaum - 2017 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 146 (3):362-375.
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  43.  7
    Context Mitigates Crowding: Peripheral Object Recognition in Real-World Images.Maarten W. A. Wijntjes & Ruth Rosenholtz - 2018 - Cognition 180:158-164.
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  44.  44
    Object Recognition in Cortex: Neural Mechanisms, and Possible Roles for Attention.Maximilian Riesenhuber - 2005 - In Laurent Itti, Geraint Rees & John K. Tsotsos (eds.), Neurobiology of Attention. Academic Press. pp. 279--287.
  45.  18
    Object Recognition as a Function of Stimulus Characteristics.William A. Barnard, Marshall Breeding & Henry A. Cross - 1984 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 22 (1):15-18.
  46.  35
    Object Recognition in Man, Monkey, and Machine Edited by Michael J. Tarr and Heinrich H. Bülthoff.J. Tanaka - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (10):401.
  47.  12
    Textons, Visual Pop-Out Effects, and Object Recognition in Infancy.Carolyn Rovee-Collier, Eileen Hankins & Ramesh Bhatt - 1992 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 121 (4):435-445.
  48.  30
    Category-Specificity in Visual Object Recognition.Christian Gerlach - 2009 - Cognition 111 (3):281-301.
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  49.  9
    Attention to Distinguishing Features in Object Recognition: An Interactive-Iterative Framework.Orit Baruch, Ruth Kimchi & Morris Goldsmith - 2018 - Cognition 170:228-244.
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  50. Object Recognition.M. Jane Riddoch & Glyn W. Humphreys - 2001 - In B. Rapp (ed.), The Handbook of Cognitive Neuropsychology: What Deficits Reveal About the Human Mind. Psychology Press/Taylor & Francis. pp. 45--74.
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