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  1. Deborah Boyle (2013). Margaret Cavendish. Philosophers' Magazine 60 (-1):63 - 65.
  2. Deborah Boyle (2013). Margaret Cavendish on Gender, Nature, and Freedom. Hypatia 28 (3):516-532.
    Some scholars have argued that Margaret Cavendish was ambivalent about women's roles and capabilities, for she seems sometimes to hold that women are naturally inferior to men, but sometimes that this inferiority is due to inferior education. I argue that attention to Cavendish's natural philosophy can illuminate her views on gender. In section II I consider the implications of Cavendish's natural philosophy for her views on male and female nature, arguing that Cavendish thought that such natures were not fixed. However, (...)
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  3. Deborah Boyle (2006). Fame, Virtue, and Government: Margaret Cavendish on Ethics and Politics. Journal of the History of Ideas 67 (2):251-289.
  4. Jacqueline Broad (2011). Is Margaret Cavendish Worthy of Study Today? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (3):457-461.
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  5. Jacqueline Broad, Margaret Cavendish and Joseph Glanvill : Science, Religion, and Witchcraft.
  6. Jacqueline Broad (2004). Cavendish Redefined. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (4):731 – 741.
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  7. Jacqueline Broad (2002). Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century. Cambridge University Press.
    In this rich and detailed study of early modern women's thought, Jacqueline Broad explores the complexity of women's responses to Cartesian philosophy and its intellectual legacy in England and Europe. She examines the work of thinkers such as Mary Astell, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway and Damaris Masham, who were active participants in the intellectual life of their time and were also the respected colleagues of philosophers such as Descartes, Leibniz and Locke. She also illuminates the continuities between (...)
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  8. Jacqueline Broad, Cavendish, van Helmont, and the Mad Raging Womb.
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  9. David Cunning, Margaret Lucas Cavendish. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  10. Karen Detlefsen (2012). Margaret Cavendish and Thomas Hobbes on Freedom, Education, and Women. In Nancy J. Hirschmann & Joanne H. Wright (eds.), Feminist Interpretations of Thomas Hobbes. The Pennsylvania State University Press. 149-168.
  11. Karen Detlefsen (2009). Margaret Cavendish on the Relation Between God and World. Philosophy Compass 4 (3):421-438.
    It has often been noted that Margaret Cavendish discusses God in her writings on natural philosophy far more than one might think she ought to given her explicit claim that a study of God belongs to theology which is to be kept strictly separate from studies in natural philosophy. In this article, I examine one way in which God enters substantially into her natural philosophy, namely the role he plays in her particular version of teleology. I conclude that, while Cavendish (...)
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  12. Karen Detlefsen (2007). Reason and Freedom: Margaret Cavendish on the Order and Disorder of Nature. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 89 (2):157-191.
    According to Margaret Cavendish the entire natural world is essentially rational such that everything thinks in some way or another. In this paper, I examine why Cavendish would believe that the natural world is ubiquitously rational, arguing against the usual account, which holds that she does so in order to account for the orderly production of very complex phenomena (e.g. living beings) given the limits of the mechanical philosophy. Rather, I argue, she attributes ubiquitous rationality to the natural world in (...)
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  13. Karen Detlefsen (2006). Atomism, Monism, and Causation in the Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish. Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 3 (199):240.
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  14. Karen Detlefsen (2002). Review of Margaret Cavendish, Observations Upon Experimental Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (7).
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  15. Stewart Duncan, The Letters in the Philosophical Letters.
    This document gives some information about the letters that make up Margaret Cavendish's Philosophical Letters (London, 1664). The descriptions of each letter are in a small number of categories: number, topic, reference, and note.
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  16. Stewart Duncan (2012). Debating Materialism: Cavendish, Hobbes, and More. History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (4):391-409.
    This paper discusses the materialist views of Margaret Cavendish, focusing on the relationships between her views and those of two of her contemporaries, Thomas Hobbes and Henry More. It argues for two main claims. First, Cavendish's views sit, often rather neatly, between those of Hobbes and More. She agreed with Hobbes on some issues and More on others, while carving out a distinctive alternative view. Secondly, the exchange between Hobbes, More, and Cavendish illustrates a more general puzzle about just what (...)
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  17. Benjamin Goldberg (2011). Lisa T. Sarasohn . The Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish: Reason and Fancy During the Scientific Revolution . Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010. Pp. Xi+251. $75.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 1 (1):169-172.
  18. Zelia Gregoriou (2013). Pedagogy and Passages: The Performativity of Margaret Cavendish's Utopian Fiction. Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (3):457-474.
    This article explores the pedagogical significance of non-static and hybrid utopian readings and writings by focusing on Margaret Cavendish's educationally-philosophically neglected female utopia The Description of a New World, Called the Blazing World. It questions the exaggerated, inflated and exclusivist emphasis on the pedagogical benefits of homologous spatial signifiers of entry into utopia and return to home and draws examples of utopian passages across genres, texts, minds and worlds from the writing of Cavendish. Such passages can be read as performative (...)
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  19. John Henry (2011). The Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish: Reason and Fancy During the Scientific Revolution. Early Science and Medicine 16 (2):173-175.
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  20. Sarah Hutton (2003). Margaret Cavendish and Henry More. In Stephen Clucas (ed.), A Princely Brave Woman: Essays on Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle. Ashgate.
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  21. Sarah Hutton (1996). In Dialogue with Thomas Hobbes: Margaret Cavendish’s Natural Philosophy. Women’s Writing 4:421-32.
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  22. Susan James (1999). The Philosophical Innovations of Margaret Cavendish. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (2):219 – 244.
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  23. Eric Lewis (2001). The Legacy of Margaret Cavendish. Perspectives on Science 9 (3):341-365.
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  24. Kourken Michaelian (2009). Margaret Cavendish's Epistemology. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (1):31 – 53.
    This paper provides a systematic reconstruction of Cavendish's general epistemology and a characterization of the fundamental role of that theory in her natural philosophy. After reviewing the outlines of her natural philosophy, I describe her treatment of 'exterior knowledge', i.e. of perception in general and of sense perception in particular. I then describe her treatment of 'interior knowledge', i.e. of self-knowledge and 'conception'. I conclude by drawing out some implications of this reconstruction for our developing understanding of Cavendish's natural philosophy.
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  25. Margaret Cavendish Newcastle (2001). Observations Upon Experimental Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Margaret Cavendish's 1668 edition of Observations upon Experimental Philosophy, presented here in its first modern edition, holds a unique position in early modern philosophy. Cavendish rejects the Aristotelianism which was taught in the universities in the seventeenth century, and the picture of nature as a grand machine which was propounded by Hobbes, Descartes and members of the Royal Society of London, such as Boyle. She also rejects the views of nature which make reference to immaterial spirits. Instead she develops an (...)
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  26. Eileen O'Neill (2013). Margaret Cavendish, Stoic Antecedent Causes, and Early Modern Occasional Causes. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 3 (3):311-326.
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  27. Lisa Sarasohn (2010). The Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish. The Johns Hopkins University Pres.
    Lisa T. Sarasohn acutely examines the brilliant work of this untrained mind and explores the unorthodox development of her natural philosophy.
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  28. L. E. Semler (2012). Margaret Cavendish's Early Engagement with Descartes and Hobbes: Philosophical Revisitation and Poetic Selection. Intellectual History Review 22 (3):327-353.
  29. Catherine Wilson (2007). Two Opponents of Material Atomism: Cavendish and Leibniz. In P. Phemister & S. Brown (eds.), Leibniz and the English-Speaking World. Springer. 35-50.
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  30. Catherine Wilson (2003). Margaret Cavendish, Observations Upon Experimental Philosophy Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (5):325-327.
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