Search results for 'psychiatric nosology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. W. A. Kinghorn (2011). Whose Disorder?: A Constructive MacIntyrean Critique of Psychiatric Nosology. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (2):187-205.score: 60.0
    The American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) has for decades been a locus of dispute between ardent defenders of its scientific validity and vociferous critics who charge that it covertly cloaks disputed moral and political judgments in scientific language. This essay explores Alasdair MacIntyre's tripartite typology of moral reasoning—"encyclopedia," "genealogy," and "tradition"—as an analytic lens for appreciation and critique of these debates. The DSM opens itself to corrosive neo-Nietzschean "genealogical" critique, such an analysis holds, (...)
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  2. Kenneth S. Kendler (2012). Epistemic Iteration as a Historical Model for Psychiatric Nosology: Promises and Limitations. In Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.), Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry Ii: Nosology. Oup Oxford. 305.score: 48.0
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  3. Kenneth S. Kendler & Peter Zachar (2008). The Incredible Insecurity of Psychiatric Nosology. In Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.), Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry: Explanation, Phenomenology, and Nosology. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 48.0
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  4. Juan J. López-Ibor Jr & María-Inés López-Ibor (2009). Anthropological Perspectives in Psychiatric Nosology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (3):259-263.score: 45.0
  5. Jason Scott Robert (2007). Gene Maps, Brain Scans, and Psychiatric Nosology. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (02):209-218.score: 45.0
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  6. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (1979). Tive Approach to Elucidating the Mechanism of Organic Behavior Changes is More Likely to Clarify the Basis of Functional Psychosis, by Analogy, Than the Current Procrustean Application of Psychiatric Nosology. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), Handbook of Behavioral Neurobiology. , Volume 2. 78.score: 45.0
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  7. Jennifer Radden (1994). Recent Criticism of Psychiatric Nosology: A Review. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 1 (3):193-200.score: 45.0
  8. Drozdstoj Stoyanov, Peter K. Machamer, Kenneth F. Schaffner & Rayito Rivera‐Hernández (2012). The Challenge of Psychiatric Nosology and Diagnosis. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (3):704-709.score: 45.0
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  9. Romain Schneckenburger (2011). Biological Psychiatry and Normative Problems: From Nosology to Destigmatization Campaigns. Medicine Studies 3 (1):9-17.score: 27.0
    Psychiatry is becoming a cognitive neuroscience. This new paradigm not only aims to give new ways for explaining mental diseases by naturalizing them, but also to have an influence on different levels of psychiatric norms. We tried here to verify whether a biological paradigm is able to fulfill this normative goal. We analyzed three main normative assumptions that is to say the will of giving psychiatry a valid nosology, a rigorous definition of what is a mental disease, and (...)
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  10. Shadia Kawa & James Giordano (2012). A Brief Historicity of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Issues and Implications for the Future of Psychiatric Canon and Practice. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):2-.score: 27.0
    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association, currently in its fourth edition and considered the reference for the characterization and diagnosis of mental disorders, has undergone various developments since its inception in the mid-twentieth century. With the fifth edition of the DSM presently in field trials for release in 2013, there is renewed discussion and debate over the extent of its relative successes - and shortcomings - at iteratively incorporating scientific evidence on the often ambiguous (...)
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  11. Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.) (2008). Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry: Explanation, Phenomenology, and Nosology. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 24.0
    This multidisciplinary collection explores three key concepts underpinning psychiatry -- explanation, phenomenology, and nosology -- and their continuing relevance in an age of neuroimaging and genetic analysis. An introduction by Kenneth S. Kendler lays out the philosophical grounding of psychiatric practice. The first section addresses the concept of explanation, from the difficulties in describing complex behavior to the categorization of psychological and biological causality. In the second section, contributors discuss experience, including the complex and vexing issue of how (...)
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  12. James Phillips, Allen Frances, Michael Cerullo, John Chardavoyne, Hannah Decker, Michael First, Nassir Ghaemi, Gary Greenberg, Andrew Hinderliter, Warren Kinghorn, Steven LoBello, Elliott Martin, Aaron Mishara, Joel Paris, Joseph Pierre, Ronald Pies, Harold Pincus, Douglas Porter, Claire Pouncey, Michael Schwartz, Thomas Szasz, Jerome Wakefield, G. Scott Waterman, Owen Whooley & Peter Zachar (2012). The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue Part 2: Issues of Conservatism and Pragmatism in Psychiatric Diagnosis. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):1-16.score: 24.0
    In face of the multiple controversies surrounding the DSM process in general and the development of DSM-5 in particular, we have organized a discussion around what we consider six essential questions in further work on the DSM. The six questions involve: 1) the nature of a mental disorder; 2) the definition of mental disorder; 3) the issue of whether, in the current state of psychiatric science, DSM-5 should assume a cautious, conservative posture or an assertive, transformative posture; 4) the (...)
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  13. James Phillips, Allen Frances, Michael A. Cerullo, John Chardavoyne, Hannah S. Decker, Michael B. First, Nassir Ghaemi, Gary Greenberg, Andrew C. Hinderliter, Warren A. Kinghorn, Steven G. LoBello, Elliott B. Martin, Aaron L. Mishara, Joel Paris, Joseph M. Pierre, Ronald W. Pies, Harold A. Pincus, Douglas Porter, Claire Pouncey, Michael A. Schwartz, Thomas Szasz, Jerome C. Wakefield, G. Waterman, Owen Whooley & Peter Zachar (2012). The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue Part 2: Issues of Conservatism and Pragmatism in Psychiatric Diagnosis. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):8-.score: 24.0
    In face of the multiple controversies surrounding the DSM process in general and the development of DSM-5 in particular, we have organized a discussion around what we consider six essential questions in further work on the DSM. The six questions involve: 1) the nature of a mental disorder; 2) the definition of mental disorder; 3) the issue of whether, in the current state of psychiatric science, DSM-5 should assume a cautious, conservative posture or an assertive, transformative posture; 4) the (...)
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  14. Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.) (2012). Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry Ii: Nosology. Oup Oxford.score: 24.0
    Psychiatry has long struggled with the nature of its diagnoses. This book brings together established experts in the wide range of disciplines that have an interest in psychiatric nosology. The contributors include philosophers, psychologists, psychiatrists, historians and representatives of the efforts of DSM-III, DSM-IV and DSM-V.
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  15. Lawrie Reznek (1987). The Nature of Disease. Routledge & Kegan Paul.score: 24.0
  16. Yazan Abu Ghazal (forthcoming). Perspectivity in Psychiatric Research: The Psychopathology of Schizophrenia in Postwar Germany (1955–1961). [REVIEW] Medicine Studies:1-9.score: 21.0
    The reorganization of psychiatric knowledge at the turn of the twentieth century derived from Emil Kraepelin’s clinical classification of psychoses. Surprisingly, within just few years, Kraepelin’s simple dichotomy between dementia praecox (schizophrenias) and manic-depressive psychosis (bipolar disorders) succeeded in giving psychiatry a new framework that is still used until the present day. Unexpectedly, Kraepelin’s simple clinical scheme based on the dichotomy replaced the significantly more differentiated nosography that dominated psychiatric research in the last three decades of the nineteenth (...)
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  17. Zenomena Pluzek (forthcoming). Diagnostic Value of MMPI Among Psychiatric Nosological Groups. Roczniki Filozoficzne: Annales de Philosophie.score: 21.0
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  18. Marion Godman (2013). Psychiatric Disorders Qua Natural Kinds: The Case of the “Apathetic Children”. [REVIEW] Biological Theory 7 (2):144-152.score: 18.0
    In this article I examine some of the issues involved in taking psychiatric disorders as natural kinds. I begin by introducing a permissive model of natural kind-hood that at least prima facie seems to allow psychiatric disorders to be natural kinds. The model, however, hinges on there in principle being some grounding that is shared by all members of a kind, which explain all or most of the additional shared projectible properties. This leads us to the following question: (...)
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  19. Lizabeth A. Barclay & Karen S. Markel (2009). Ethical Fairness and Human Rights: The Treatment of Employees with Psychiatric Disabilities. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):333 - 345.score: 18.0
    Extant business research has not addressed the ethical treatment of individuals with psychiatric disabilities. This article will describe previous research on individuals with psychiatric disabilities drawn from rehabilitation, psychological, managerial, legal, as well as related business ethics writings before presenting a framework that illustrates the dynamics of (un)ethical behavior in relation to the employment of such individuals. Individuals with psychiatric disabilities often evoke negative reactions from those in their environment. Lastly, we provide recommendations for how employees and (...)
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  20. Enric J. Novella (2010). Mental Health Care and the Politics of Inclusion: A Social Systems Account of Psychiatric Deinstitutionalization. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (6):411-427.score: 18.0
    This paper provides an interpretation, based on the social systems theory of German sociologist Niklas Luhmann, of the recent paradigmatic shift of mental health care from an asylum-based model to a community-oriented network of services. The observed shift is described as the development of psychiatry as a function system of modern society and whose operative goal has moved from the medical and social management of a lower and marginalized group to the specialized medical and psychological care of the whole population. (...)
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  21. Jennifer Radden (2010). The Virtuous Psychiatrist: Character Ethics in Psychiatric Practice. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Psychiatric ethics as professional and biomedical ethics -- The distinctiveness of the psychiatric setting -- Psychiatric ethics as virtue ethics -- Elements of a gender-sensitive ethics for psychiatry -- Some virtues for psychiatrists -- Character and social role -- Case studies in psychiatric virtues.
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  22. Jonathan Y. Tsou (forthcoming). DSM-5 and Psychiatry's Second Revolution: Descriptive Vs. Theoretical Approaches to Psychiatric Classification. In Steeves Demazeux & Patrick Singy (eds.), The DSM-5 in Perspective: Philosophical Reflections on the Psychiatric Babel. Springer.score: 18.0
    A large part of the controversy surrounding the publication of DSM-5 stems from the possibility of replacing the purely descriptive approach to classification favored by the DSM since 1980. This paper examines the question of how mental disorders should be classified, focusing on the issue of whether the DSM should adopt a purely descriptive or theoretical approach. I argue that the DSM should replace its purely descriptive approach with a theoretical approach that integrates causal information into the DSM’s descriptive diagnostic (...)
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  23. Veikko Pelto-Piri, Karin Engström & Ingemar Engström (2013). Paternalism, Autonomy and Reciprocity: Ethical Perspectives in Encounters with Patients in Psychiatric in-Patient Care. BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):49.score: 18.0
    Psychiatric staff members have the power to decide the options that frame encounters with patients. Intentional as well as unintentional framing can have a crucial impact on patients’ opportunities to be heard and participate in the process. We identified three dominant ethical perspectives in the normative medical ethics literature concerning how doctors and other staff members should frame interactions in relation to patients; paternalism, autonomy and reciprocity. The aim of this study was to describe and analyse statements describing real (...)
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  24. Phil Bielby (2012). Ulysses Arrangements in Psychiatric Treatment: Towards Proposals for Their Use Based on 'Sharing' Legal Capacity. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis:1-29.score: 18.0
    A ‘Ulysses arrangement’ (UA) is an agreement where a patient may arrange for psychiatric treatment or non-treatment to occur at a later stage when she expects to change her mind. In this article, I focus on ‘competence-insensitive’ UAs, which raise the question of the permissibility of overriding the patient’s subsequent decisionally competent change of mind on the authority of the patient’s own prior agreement. In “The Ethical Justification for Ulysses Arrangements”, I consider sceptical and supportive arguments concerning competence-insensitive UAs, (...)
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  25. Sidney Bloch & Stephen A. Green (eds.) (2009). Psychiatric Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Ethical issues are pivotal to the practice of psychiatry. Anyone involved in psychiatric practice and mental healthcare has to be aware of the range of ethical issues relevant to their profession. An increased professional commitment to accountability, in parallel with a growing "consumer" movement has paved the way for a creative engagement with the ethical movement. The bestselling 'Psychiatric Ethics' has carved out a niche for itself as the major comprehensive text and core reference in the field, covering (...)
     
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  26. Donna Dickenson (2000). In Two Minds: A Casebook of Psychiatric Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    In Two Minds is a practical casebook of problem solving in psychiatric ethics. Written in a lively and accessible style, it builds on a series of detailed case histories to illustrate the central place of ethical reasoning as a key competency for clinical work and research in psychiatry. Topics include risk, dangerousness and confidentiality; judgements of responsibility; involuntary treatment and mental health legislation; consent to genetic screening; dual role issues in child and adolescent psychiatry; needs assessment; cross-cultural and gender (...)
     
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  27. Linda Isaac (2012). Facing the Future: Face-Emotion Processing Deficits as a Potential Biomarker For Various Psychiatric and Neurological Disorders. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    Facing the Future: Face-Emotion Processing Deficits as a Potential Biomarker For Various Psychiatric and Neurological Disorders.
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  28. Abraham Rudnick (2013). What is a Psychiatric Disability? Health Care Analysis:1-9.score: 18.0
    This article aims to clarify the notion of a psychiatric disability. The article uses conceptual analysis, examining and applying established definitions of (general) disability to psychiatric disabilities. This analysis reveals that disability as inability to perform according to expectations or norms is related to impairment as deviation from the (statistical) norm, while disability as inability to achieve (personal) goals is related to impairment as deviation from the (personal) ideal. These two views of impairment and disability are distinct from (...)
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  29. A. Shrivastava & M. E. Johnston (2010). Weight-Gain in Psychiatric Treatment: Risks, Implications, and Strategies for Prevention and Management. Mens Sana Monographs 8 (1):53.score: 18.0
    Weight-gain in psychiatric populations is a common clinical challenge. Many patients suffering from mental disorders, when exposed to psychotropic medications, gain significant weight with or without other side-effects. In addition to reducing the patients' willingness to comply with treatment, this weight-gain may create added psychological or physiological problems that need to be addressed. Thus, it is critical that clinicians take precautions to monitor and control weight-gain and take into account and treat all problems facing an individual. In this review, (...)
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  30. A. R. Singh & S. A. Singh (2003). What Shall We Do About Our Concern with the Most Recent in Psychiatric Research? Mens Sana Monographs 1 (3):3.score: 18.0
    Most clinicians and researchers are concerned with recent advances in psychiatry. This involves the danger whether something time-tested may get sidelined for extra-scientific reasons. That the pharmaceutical industry and super-specialist researcher may keep churning out new findings to impress audiences is only a partial truth. Research progresses by refutation and self-correction. Acceptance in science is always provisional; changing paradigms, frameworks of enquiry and raising new questions is integral to break through in scientific knowledge. Hence, there is in science a constant (...)
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  31. Jerome C. Wakefield (2010). False Positives in Psychiatric Diagnosis: Implications for Human Freedom. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (1):5-17.score: 15.0
    Current symptom-based DSM and ICD diagnostic criteria for mental disorders are prone to yielding false positives because they ignore the context of symptoms. This is often seen as a benign flaw because problems of living and emotional suffering, even if not true disorders, may benefit from support and treatment. However, diagnosis of a disorder in our society has many ramifications not only for treatment choice but for broader social reactions to the diagnosed individual. In particular, mental disorders impose a sick (...)
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  32. Marga Reimer (2010). Moral Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis: The Cluster B Personality Disorders. Neuroethics 3 (2):173-184.score: 15.0
    Medical professionals, including mental health professionals, largely agree that moral judgment should be kept out of clinical settings. The rationale is simple: moral judgment has the capacity to impair clinical judgment in ways that could harm the patient. However, when the patient is suffering from a "Cluster B" personality disorder, keeping moral judgment out of the clinic might appear impossible, not only in practice but also in theory. For the diagnostic criteria associated with these particular disorders (Antisocial, Borderline, Histrionic, Narcissistic) (...)
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  33. Bernard D. Beitman & Jyotsna Nair (2004). Self-Awareness Deficits in Psychiatric Patients: Neurobiology, Assessment, and Treatment. W.W.Norton.score: 15.0
  34. J. Agich George (1994). On Values in Recent American Psychiatric Classification. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (3).score: 15.0
    The DSM-IV, like its predecessors, will be a major influence on American psychiatry. As a consequence, continuing analysis of its assumptions is essential. Review of the manuals as well as conceptually-oriented literature on DSM-III, DSM-III-R, and DSM-IV reveals that the authors of these classifications have paid little attention to the explicit and implicit value commitments made by the classifications. The response to DSM criticisms and controversy has often been to incorporate more scientific diversity into the classification, instead of careful inquiry (...)
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  35. Petr Bob (2006). Self-Awareness Deficits in Psychiatric Patients. Neurobiology. Assessment and Treatment. [REVIEW] Journal of Analytical Psychology 51 (2):311-312.score: 15.0
  36. Martin Brüne (2004). Understanding the Symptoms of “Schizophrenia” in Evolutionary Terms. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):857-857.score: 15.0
    An evolutionary theory of schizophrenia needs to address all symptoms associated with the condition. Burns' framework could be extended in a way embracing behavioural signs such as catatonia. Burns' theory is, however, not specific to schizophrenia. Since no one single symptom exists that is pathognomonic for “schizophrenia,” an evolutionary proposal of psychiatric disorders raises the question whether our anachronistic psychiatric nosology warrants revision.
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  37. Richard J. Davidson, Toward a Biology of Personality and Emotion.score: 15.0
    For most of this past century, scholarship on the topics of personal- ity and emotion has emerged from the humanities and social sciences. In the past decade, a remarkable change has occurred in the influence of neuro- science on the conceptualization and study of these phenomena. This article ar- gues that the categories that have emerged from psychiatric nosology and descriptive personality theory may be inadequate, and that new categories and dimensions derived from neuroscience research may produce a (...)
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  38. A. A. Howsepian (2004). Sexual Modification Therapies: Ethical Controversies, Philosophical Disputes, and Theological Reflections. Christian Bioethics 10 (2-3):117-136.score: 15.0
    Knowing, either by the light of natural reason or by the light of Christian revelation, that homosexuality is a disordered condition is not sufficient for its being ethically permissible to direct self-identified homosexual persons toward just any treatment that aims to modify sexual orientation. For example, such an undertaking would be morally impermissible in cases where the available “treatments” are known to be both futile and potentially damaging to persons undertaking them. I, therefore, introduce this edition of Christian Bioethics by (...)
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  39. Don Ross, Syndrome Stabilization in Psychiatry: Pathological Gambling as a Case Study.score: 15.0
    Murphy (2006) criticizes psychiatric nosology from the perspective of the philosophy of science, arguing that the model of pathology as encapsulated in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders reflects a folk conception of the mental, and of malfunctioning, that is inadequately integrated with cognitive and behavioral neuroscience. The present paper supports this view through a case study of research on pathological gambling. It argues that recent modeling based on fMRI studies and behavioral genetics suggests a stipulative, (...)
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  40. Eileen P. Anderson‐Fye & Jerry Floersch (2011). “I'm Not Your Typical 'Homework Stresses Me Out' Kind of Girl”: Psychological Anthropology in Research on College Student Usage of Psychiatric Medications and Mental Health Services. Ethos 39 (4):501-521.score: 15.0
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  41. Liang Su, Jingjing Huang, Weimin Yang, Huafang Li, Yifeng Shen & Yifeng Xu (2012). Ethics, Patient Rights and Staff Attitudes in Shanghai's Psychiatric Hospitals. BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):8-.score: 15.0
    Adherence to ethical principles in clinical research and practice is becoming topical issue in China, where the prevalence of mental illness is rising, but treatment facilities remain underdeveloped. This paper reports on a study aiming to understand the ethical knowledge and attitudes of Chinese mental health professionals in relation to the process of diagnosis and treatment, informed consent, and privacy protection in clinical trials.
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  42. Bente Berget, Sverre Grepperud, Olaf G. Aasland & Bjarne O. Braastad (2013). Animal-Assisted Interventions and Psychiatric Disorders: Knowledge and Attitudes Among General Practitioners, Psychiatrists, and Psychologists. Society and Animals 21 (3):284-293.score: 15.0
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  43. Bente Berget, Olaf G. Aasland, Sverre Grepperud & Bjarne O. Braastad (2013). Animal-Assisted Interventions and Psychiatric Disorders: Knowledge and Attitudes Among General Practitioners, Psychiatrists, and Psychologists. Society and Animals 21 (3):284-293.score: 15.0
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  44. Mitchell K. Byrne, Frank P. Deane, Aimee Willis, Barbara Hawkins & Rebecca Quinn (2009). Preliminary Reliability of an Observer Rating Scale for Assessing Medication Adherence on Psychiatric Wards. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (2):246-251.score: 15.0
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  45. Paolo Curci & Cesare Secchi (2005). Making Diagnoses in Psychiatric Clinical Practice: The Point of View of the Psychotherapeutic Attitude. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (1):63-68.score: 15.0
    Using a “psychotherapeutic attitude”, as a criterion and measure of the psychiatrist’s involvement in clinical relationship (with the “trial identification” according to Fliess), some phenomenological and epistemological considerations are offered about diagnostic assessments, as a synchronic and diachronic recognising process. Inspired by Gehlen’s notion of “exoneration” (i.e., the reducing and focusing of the perceptive experience as applied to the wealth of the perceptible), this paper examines how the mind of a skilled diagnostician might work. Three levels are explored: firstly, “the (...)
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  46. Franciska Desplenter, Gert Laekeman, Philip Moons & Steven Simoens (2010). Discharge Management for Patients in Flemish Psychiatric Hospitals. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (6):1116-1123.score: 15.0
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  47. Frank J. Flier & Pieter F. De Vries Robbé (1999). Nosology and Causal Necessity; The Relation BetweenDefining a Disease and Discovering its Necessary Cause. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (6):577-588.score: 15.0
    The problem of disease definition is related to theproblem of proving that a certain agent is thenecessary cause of a certain disease. Natural kindterms like ‘rheumatoid arthritis’ and ‘AIDS’ refer toessences which are discoverable rather thanpredeterminate. No statement about such diseases isa priori necessarily true. Because theories onnecessary causes involve natural kind semantics,Koch's postulates cannot be used to falsify or verifysuch theories. Instead of proving that agent A is thenecessary cause of disease D, we include A in atheoretical definition of (...)
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  48. Stephen A. Green & Sidney Bloch (eds.) (2006). An Anthology of Psychiatric Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 15.0
  49. H. E. King & C. Landis (1943). A Comparison of Eyelid Responses Conditioned with Reflex and Voluntary Reinforcement in Normal Individuals and in Psychiatric Patients. Journal of Experimental Psychology 33 (3):210.score: 15.0
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