Results for '*Infant Development'

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  1.  16
    Theories of Infant Development.Gavin Bremner & Alan Slater (eds.) - 2004 - Blackwell.
    This volume provides an authoritative, up-to-date survey of theories of infant development.
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  2.  33
    A Primer of Infant Development.Christopher Clay & Virginia Brabender - 1978 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):116-117.
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  3. Infant Development: Physical and Social Cognition.T. Striano & M. Tomasello - 2001 - In N. J. Smelser & B. Baltes (eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. pp. 7410--7414.
  4.  3
    A Dynamical Systems Perspective on Infant Action and its Development.Eugene C. Goldfield & Peter H. Wolff - 2004 - In Gavin Bremner & Alan Slater (eds.), Theories of Infant Development. Blackwell. pp. 1--29.
  5.  4
    Emotion-Cognition Interactions in Early Infant Development.Marc D. Lewis - 1993 - Cognition and Emotion 7 (2):145-170.
  6.  1
    The Reciprocal Impact of Breast-Feeding and Culture Form on Maternal Behaviour and Infant Development.Nancy Shand - 1981 - Journal of Biosocial Science 13 (1):1-17.
  7. Mental Health and Infant Development: Volume One: Papers and Discussions.Kenneth Soddy - 1999 - Routledge.
    First published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
     
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  8. Mental Health and Infant Development: Volume Two: Case Histories.Kenneth Soddy - 1999 - Routledge.
    First published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
     
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  9.  12
    The Development of Parent-Infant Attachment Through Dynamic and Interactive Signaling Loops of Care and Cry.James Edward Swain, Linda C. Mayes & James F. Leckman - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):472-473.
    In addition to the infant cry being a signal for attention, it may also be a critical component of the early formation of attachments with caregivers. We consider the complex development of that attachment, which involves reciprocal interactive signaling and a host of evolutionarily conserved caregiver factors.
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  10.  16
    Endogenous and Exogenous Opiates Modulate the Development of Parent–Infant Attachment.James Edward Swain, Linda C. Mayes & James F. Leckman - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):364-365.
    In addition to endogenously produced opiates, which are part of normal affiliative neurocircuitry and attachment formation, exogenous opiates – such as drugs of addiction and abuse – may affect affiliation. We consider possible modulatory effects of such exogenous opiates on the development of early parent–infant attachment from both parents' and infants' perspectives.
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  11.  5
    Infant Speech: Speech Sound Development of Sibling and Only Infants.Orvis C. Irwin - 1948 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (5):600.
  12.  55
    The Dynamics of Embodiment: A Field Theory of Infant Perseverative Reaching.Esther Thelen, Gregor Schöner, Christian Scheier & Linda B. Smith - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):1-34.
    The overall goal of this target article is to demonstrate a mechanism for an embodied cognition. The particular vehicle is a much-studied, but still widely debated phenomenon seen in 7–12 month-old-infants. In Piaget's classic “A-not-B error,” infants who have successfully uncovered a toy at location “A” continue to reach to that location even after they watch the toy hidden in a nearby location “B.” Here, we question the traditional explanations of the error as an indicator of infants' concepts of objects (...)
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  13.  21
    Infant Directed Speech and the Development of Speech Perception: Enhancing Development or an Unintended Consequence?Bob McMurray, Kristine A. Kovack-Lesh, Dresden Goodwin & William McEchron - 2013 - Cognition 129 (2):362-378.
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  14. Problems in the Study of Infant Emotional Development.Michael Lewis - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (2):131-137.
  15.  4
    Parenting Practices in the Basque Country: Implications of Infant and Childhood Sleeping Location for Personality Development.C. Joanne Crawford - 1994 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 22 (1):42-82.
  16.  2
    Dynamic Mental Representation in infancy1Portions of This Research Have Been Presented at the International Conference on Infant Studies, Society for Research in Child Development, and Association for Research in Vision and Opthamology.1.Susan J. Hespos & Philippe Rochat - 1997 - Cognition 64 (2):153-188.
  17. Dissociations in Infant Memory: Rethinking the Development of Implicit and Explicit Memory.Carolyn Rovee-Collier - 1997 - Psychological Review 104 (3):467-498.
  18. Lick Rate Development in Infant Mongolian Gerbils.Stephen C. Pierson & Robert W. Schaeffer - 1975 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 5 (1):47-48.
  19.  7
    Development of Homeothermy in Infant C3H Mice.Z. Michael Nagy - 1993 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 31 (3):221-224.
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  20. Parenting Practices in the Basque Country: Implications of Infant and Childhood Sleeping Location for Personality Development.C. Joanne Crawford - 1994 - Ethos 22 (1):42-82.
  21. Effects of Experience on Sensory and Perceptual Development: Implications for Infant Cognition.Richard N. Aslin - 1985 - In Jacques Mehler & R. Fox (eds.), Neonate Cognition: Beyond the Blooming Buzzing Confusion. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 157--183.
  22.  3
    Influences on Development in Infant Chimpanzees: Enculturation, Temperament, and Cognition.Kim A. Bard & Kathryn H. Gardner - 1996 - In A. Russon, Kim A. Bard & S. Parkers (eds.), Reaching Into Thought: The Minds of the Great Apes. Cambridge University Press. pp. 235--256.
  23.  1
    Endogenous and Exogenous Opiates Modulate the Development of Parent-Infant Attachment.Swain Je, L. C. Mayes & J. F. Leckman - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3).
  24.  1
    Development of Acquisition and 24-H Retention of a Directional One-Way Active Avoidance Response in Infant Swiss Mice.Z. Michael Nagy, James Chien-Shih Ku & Kenneth J. Porada - 1980 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 15 (1):5-8.
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  25. The Development of the Infant and Young Child: Normal and Abnormal by R. S. Illingworth.John D. Burrington - 1977 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 21 (1):162-163.
  26. Discussion: The R?Le of Mass Activity in the Development of Infant Behavior.W. Dennis - 1932 - Psychological Review 39 (6):593-595.
  27. Statistical Learning in Infant Language Development.Rebecca Gómez - 2009 - In Gareth Gaskell (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Psycholinguistics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  28. Infant Philosophy, Containing an Analysis of the Faculties of the Mind, as Discovered in Their Development.Jacob[from old catalog] Lindley - 1946 - Union Town [Pa.]Pub. By the Author.
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  29. Development of Spatial Memory in the Human Infant.P. Mangan & L. Nadel - 1990 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (6):513-514.
     
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  30. Infant Hand Preference and the Development of Cognitive Abilities.George F. Michel, Julie M. Campbell, Emily C. Marcinowski, Eliza L. Nelson & Iryna Babik - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  31. Room to Grow! The Development of the Nursery and Infant School.E. Winifred Miller - 1944 - G.G. Harrap.
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  32. Effect of Turn Preference Upon Development of Discriminated T-Maze Training Ability of Infant Mice.Z. Michael Nagy - 1973 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 1 (6):441-442.
  33. The Development of Locomotor Response to D- and L-Amphetamine in the Infant Mouse.Donald Ray & Z. Michael Nagy - 1992 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (5):359-362.
  34. Child Development: Journal of Infant, Child, and Adolescent Psychotherapy, 2.1.Kirkland C. Vaughns (ed.) - 2003 - Routledge.
    First published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  35. Infant Social Development Across the Transition From Crawling to Walking.Eric A. Walle - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  36. The Development of Right-Handedness in a Normal Infant.Helen Thompson Woolley - 1910 - Psychological Review 17 (1):37-41.
  37.  30
    The Development of Implicit and Explicit Memory.Carolyn Rovee-Collier, Harlene Hayne & Michael Colombo (eds.) - 2001 - Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
    This is the only book that examines the theory and data on the development of implicit and explicit memory. It first describes the characteristics of implicit and explicit memory (including conscious recollection) and tasks used with adults to measure them. Next, it reviews the brain mechanisms thought to underlie implicit and explicit memory and the studies with amnesics that initially prompted the search for different neuroanatomically-based memory systems. Two chapters review the Jacksonian (first in, last out) principle and empirical (...)
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  38.  2
    Emerging Co-Awareness.Philippe Rochat - 2004 - In Gavin Bremner & Alan Slater (eds.), Theories of Infant Development. Blackwell. pp. 258-283.
  39.  4
    On the Development of Early Conditioned Reflexes and Differentiations of Auditory Stimuli in Infants.N. I. Kasatkin & A. M. Levikova - 1935 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 18 (1):1.
  40.  3
    Primate Sociality to Human Cooperation.Kristen Hawkes - 2013 - Human Nature 25 (1):1-21.
    Developmental psychologists identify propensities for social engagement in human infants that are less evident in other apes; Sarah Hrdy links these social propensities to novel features of human childrearing. Unlike other ape mothers, humans can bear a new baby before the previous child is independent because they have help. This help alters maternal trade-offs and so imposes new selection pressures on infants and young children to actively engage their caretakers’ attention and commitment. Such distinctive childrearing is part of our grandmothering (...)
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  41. The Infant's Experience of the World: Stern, Merleau-Ponty and the Phenomenology of the Preverbal Self.Eva Maria Simms - 1993 - Humanistic Psychologist 21 (1):26-40.
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  42.  25
    Putting Unicepts to Work: A Teleosemantic Perspective on the Infant Mindreading Puzzle.John Michael - forthcoming - Synthese:1-24.
    In this paper, I show how theoretical discussion of recent research on the abilities of infants and young children to represent other agents’ beliefs has been shaped by a descriptivist conception of mental content, i.e., to the notion that the distal content of a mental representation is fixed by the core body of knowledge that is associated with that mental representation. I also show how alternative conceptions of mental content—and in particular Ruth Millikan’s teleosemantic approach—make it possible to endorse the (...)
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  43.  25
    Vocal Development as a Guide to Modeling the Evolution of Language.D. Kimbrough Oller, Ulrike Griebel & Anne S. Warlaumont - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (2):382-392.
    Modeling of evolution and development of language has principally utilized mature units of spoken language, phonemes and words, as both targets and inputs. This approach cannot address the earliest phases of development because young infants are unable to produce such language features. We argue that units of early vocal development—protophones and their primitive illocutionary/perlocutionary forces—should be targeted in evolutionary modeling because they suggest likely units of hominin vocalization/communication shortly after the split from the chimpanzee/bonobo lineage, and because (...)
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  44.  39
    Imaging the Developing Brain: What Have We Learned About Cognitive Development?B. J. Casey, N. Tottenham, C. Liston & S. Durston - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (3):104-110.
  45.  35
    Processes of Change in Brain and Cognitive Development.M. H. Johnson & Y. Munakata - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (3):152-158.
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  46.  17
    How Evolution May Work Through Curiosity‐Driven Developmental Process.Pierre‐Yves Oudeyer & Linda B. Smith - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (2):492-502.
    Infants' own activities create and actively select their learning experiences. Here we review recent models of embodied information seeking and curiosity-driven learning and show that these mechanisms have deep implications for development and evolution. We discuss how these mechanisms yield self-organized epigenesis with emergent ordered behavioral and cognitive developmental stages. We describe a robotic experiment that explored the hypothesis that progress in learning, in and for itself, generates intrinsic rewards: The robot learners probabilistically selected experiences according to their potential (...)
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  47.  20
    Language at Three Timescales: The Role of Real‐Time Processes in Language Development and Evolution.Bob McMurray - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (2):393-407.
    Evolutionary developmental systems theory stresses that selection pressures operate on entire developmental systems rather than just genes. This study extends this approach to language evolution, arguing that selection pressure may operate on two quasi-independent timescales. First, children clearly must acquire language successfully and evolution must equip them with the tools to do so. Second, while this is developing, they must also communicate with others in the moment using partially developed knowledge. These pressures may require different solutions, and their combination may (...)
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  48.  2
    Why Are There Developmental Stages in Language Learning? A Developmental Robotics Model of Language Development.Anthony F. Morse & Angelo Cangelosi - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (8).
    Most theories of learning would predict a gradual acquisition and refinement of skills as learning progresses, and while some highlight exponential growth, this fails to explain why natural cognitive development typically progresses in stages. Models that do span multiple developmental stages typically have parameters to “switch” between stages. We argue that by taking an embodied view, the interaction between learning mechanisms, the resulting behavior of the agent, and the opportunities for learning that the environment provides can account for the (...)
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  49.  6
    Diseases of Poverty and Lifestyle, Well-Being and Human Development.R. Singh Ajai & A. Singh Shakuntala - 2008 - Mens Sana Monographs 6 (1):187-225.
    The problems of the haves differ substantially from those of the have-nots. Individuals in developing societies have to fight mainly against infectious and communicable diseases, while in the developed world the battles are mainly against lifestyle diseases. Yet, at a very fundamental level, the problems are the same-the fight is against distress, disability, and premature death; against human exploitation and for human development and self-actualisation; against the callousness to critical concerns in regimes and scientific power centres. While there has (...)
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  50. Why Are There Developmental Stages in Language Learning? A Developmental Robotics Model of Language Development.Anthony F. Morse & Angelo Cangelosi - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S1):32-51.
    Most theories of learning would predict a gradual acquisition and refinement of skills as learning progresses, and while some highlight exponential growth, this fails to explain why natural cognitive development typically progresses in stages. Models that do span multiple developmental stages typically have parameters to “switch” between stages. We argue that by taking an embodied view, the interaction between learning mechanisms, the resulting behavior of the agent, and the opportunities for learning that the environment provides can account for the (...)
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