Results for 'Aristippus'

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  1. Aristippus and Xenophon as Plato’s Contemporary Literary Rivals and the Role of Gymnastikè (Γυμναστική).Konstantinos Gkaleas - 2015 - E-Logos Electronic Journal for Philosophy 22:4-11.
    Plato was a Socrates’ friend and disciple, but he wasn’t the only one. No doubt, Socrates had many followers, however, the majority of their work is lost. Was there any antagonism among his followers? Who succeeded in interpreting Socrates? Who could be considered as his successor? Of course, we don’t know if these questions emerged after the death of Socrates, but the Greek doxography suggests that there was a literary rivalry. As we underlined earlier, most unfortunately, we can’t examine all (...)
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  2.  25
    Aristippus on Freedom, Autonomy, and the Pleasurable Life.Kristian Urstad - 2017 - In Christopher Moore & Alessandro Stavru (eds.), Socrates and the Socratic Dialogue. Brill.
    The traditional characterization we have handed down to us of Aristippus of Cyrene is of someone who lacks or simply repudiates any notion of self-control and, hence, of someone susceptible to unrestrained excess and self-enslavement. I hope to show here that such a characterization deserves significant reassessment.
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  3. Aristippus & Others.Hugh Chandler - manuscript
    This 'paper' was intended as the first chapter of a book. It sketches Aristippus'theory of ethics, and discusses various objections to it (Plato, Aristotle, etc.).
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  4.  23
    Aristippus.Tim O'Keefe - 2001 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Brief article on this hedonist, follower of Socrates, and founder of the Cyrenaic school.
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  5. Aristippus.Hugh Chandler - manuscript
    This was an early chapter of what was later turned out to be a very different book. It sketches Aristippus’ theory of ethics and some of the arguments offered by others (e.g. Plato and Aristotle) in opposition to that theory.
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  6.  58
    Pathos, Pleasure and the Ethical Life in Aristippus.Kristian Urstad - 2009 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy.
    For many of the ancient Greek philosophers, the ethical life was understood to be closely tied up with important notions like rational integrity, self-control, self-sufficiency, and so on. Because of this, feeling or passion (pathos), and in particular, pleasure, was viewed with suspicion. There was a general insistence on drawing up a sharp contrast between a life of virtue on the one hand and one of pleasure on the other. While virtue was regarded as rational and as integral to advancing (...)
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  7. Aristippus and Freedom in Xenophon's Memorabilia.Kristian Urstad - 2008 - Praxis.
    In Book II of Xenophon’s Memorabilia the hedonist Aristippus speaks very briefly, though quite emphatically, about a kind of freedom with regards to desires, pleasures and happiness. Much of the later testimony on him suggests a similar concern. My interest here in this paper is in understanding the nature of this freedom. For both dialectical and expositional purposes, I begin with a brief examination of some of the relevant views put forth in Plato’s Gorgias and of the larger socio-philosophical (...)
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  8.  39
    Prudence, Rationality and Happiness in Aristippus.Kristian Urstad - 2008 - Gnosis.
    It is noticeably clear from several ancient sources that the hedonist Aristippus of Cyrene (a friend and student of Socrates) asks us to concentrate on enjoying the pleasures of the present or near­ future. What is not so obvious is his reason for such a recommendation. Although any explanation for this is bound to be somewhat speculative due to the inadequacy of the sources, I would like to offer a possible rationale for, and subsequent reconstruction of, his view, one (...)
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  9.  9
    Aristippus at the Crossroads: The Politics of Pleasure in Xenophon’s Memorabilia.David M. S. Johnson - 2009 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 26 (2):204-222.
    In two passages from Xenophon’s Memorabilia, Socrates refutes Aristippus, first by a rather brutal brand of Realpolitik, then by refusing to answer Aristippus’ questions about the good and the beautiful. This article argues that the nasty politics that emerge in Memorabilia 2.1 are not Socratic, but rather the natural consequence of Aristippean hedonism. Political considerations of another sort drive Socrates’ tactics in Memorabilia 3.8, where his evasive manoeuvres are driven by his desire to avoid a direct confrontation with (...)
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  10.  8
    Aristippus and Freedom in Xenophon's Memorabilia.Kristian Urstad - 2008 - Praxis 1 (2).
    In Book II of Xenophon’s Memorabilia, in a discussion with Socrates, the hedonist Aristippus speaks very briefly, though quite emphatically, about a kind of freedom with regards to desires, pleasures and happiness. Much of the later testimony on him suggests a similar concern. My interest in this paper is in understanding the nature of this freedom. In order to do so however I begin with a brief elucidation into some of Socrates’ and Callicles’ proclamations in Plato’s Gorgias about their (...)
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  11. Aristippus at the Crossroads: The Politics of Pleasure in Xenophon's Memorabilia.David Johnson - 2009 - Polis 26 (2):204-222.
    In two passages from Xenophon's Memorabilia, Socrates refutes Aristippus, first by a rather brutal brand of Realpolitik , then by refusing to answer Aristippus' questions about the good and the beautiful . This article argues that the nasty politics that emerge in Memorabilia 2.1 are not Socratic, but rather the natural consequence of Aristippean hedonism. Political considerations of another sort drive Socrates' tactics in Memorabilia 3.8, where his evasive manoeuvres are driven by his desire to avoid a direct (...)
     
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  12.  28
    Henricus Aristippus, William of Moerbeke and Two Alleged Mediaeval Translations of Hero's Pneumatica.Edward Grant - 1971 - Speculum 46 (4):656-669.
    It has long been accepted that by the third quarter of the thirteenth century at least two Latin translations had been made from the Greek text of the Pneumatica of Hero of Alexandria. Evidence of the first of these was discovered by Valentin Rose in Henricus Aristippus' prologue to his translation of Plato's Phaedo completed in 1156. Some fifty years later, on the basis of a letter written in 1274 following the death of St Thomas Aquinas, Alexander Birkenmajer attributed (...)
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  13. Aristippus Against Happiness.T. H. Irwin - 1991 - The Monist 74 (1):55-82.
    Many Greek moralists are eudaemonists; they assume that happiness is the ultimate end of rational human action. Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and most of their successors treat this assumption as the basis of their ethical argument. But not all Greek moralists agree; and since the eudaemonist assumption may not seem as obviously correct to us as it seems to many Greek moralists, it is worth considering the views of those Greeks who dissent from it.
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  14.  11
    Prudence, Rationality and Happiness in Aristippus.Kristian Urstad - 2008 - Gnosis 9:1-23.
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  15.  28
    The Life of Aristippus.Wolfgang-Rainer Mann - 1996 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 78 (2):97-119.
  16. Marsilio Ficino’s ‘De Vita Platonis, Apologia de Moribus Platonis’. Against the Poetasters and Cynics: Aristippus, Lucian, Cerberus and Other Dogs.Denis Robichaud - 2006 - Accademia 8:23-59.
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  17.  23
    Hedonistic Theories From Aristippus to Spencer.John Watson.W. R. Sorley - 1896 - International Journal of Ethics 6 (3):385-387.
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  18.  27
    The Text of the Phaedo in W and in Henricus Aristippus' Translation.H. Klos & L. Minio-Paluello - 1949 - Classical Quarterly 43 (3-4):126-.
    Burent's and Robin's collations of W differ for the text of the Phaedo in about 130 readings of a more than orthographical interest.✝ A new inspection of the manuscript has shown that Robin very often corrected Burnet, but added some twenty mistakes. The actual readings of W and of its second handW2 are given in the following list; each of them is followed, after a colon, by Burnet's and Robin's misreadings. The Stephanus numeration refers to Burnet's edition.
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  19.  13
    Aristippus for Happiness.Kristian Urstad - 2009 - Philosophy Pathways 145.
  20.  10
    Aristippus, Ulysses, and the Philosophus Polutropos in Horace Epistles, Book 1.Michael C. Mascio - 2018 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 111 (2):227-252.
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  21.  23
    Managing Mental Pain: Epicurus Vs. Aristippus on the Pre-Rehearsal of Future Ills.Margaret Graver - 2002 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 17 (1):155-184.
  22.  12
    The Text of the Phaedo in W and in Henricus Aristippus' Translation.H. Klos & L. Minio-Paluello - 1949 - Classical Quarterly 43 (3-4):126-129.
    Burent's and Robin's collations of W differ for the text of the Phaedo in about 130 readings of a more than orthographical interest.✝ A new inspection of the manuscript has shown that Robin very often corrected Burnet, but added some twenty mistakes. The actual readings of W and of its second handW2 are given in the following list; each of them is followed, after a colon, by Burnet's and Robin's misreadings. The Stephanus numeration refers to Burnet's edition.
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  23.  25
    Aristippus' Meno 79 A.R. S. Bluck - 1958 - The Classical Review 8 (02):108-109.
  24.  17
    Book Review:Hedonistic Theories From Aristippus to Spencer. John Watson. [REVIEW]W. R. Sorley - 1896 - Ethics 6 (3):385-.
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  25.  6
    Hedonistic Theories From Aristippus to Spencer.W. R. Sorley - 1896 - International Journal of Ethics 6 (3):385-387.
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  26.  8
    X. Zu Aristippus.E. Zeller - 1888 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 1 (2):172-177.
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  27.  6
    Hedonistic Theories From Aristippus to Spencer.Ernest Albee - 1896 - Philosophical Review 5 (1):62-64.
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  28.  4
    Foreigner in His Own Land. Aristippus Like Model of Aristotelian Ápolis [Spanish].Maria Florencia Zayas - 2013 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 18:124-147.
    El debate en torno a Aristipo de Cirene, cuya concepción de la felicidad coloca en el centro de la escena al placer, pone en tela de juicio las afirmaciones propias de aquellas éticas nucleadas bajo el epíteto de eudemonistas. Con el desplazamiento de la felicidad del sitial del fin, Aristipo reformula la dimensión ética tradicional: a través del ejercicio de la enkráteia, y lejos de caer en un relativismo subjetivista, intenta construir una ética que tenga como base un objetivismo gnoseológico. (...)
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  29. Hedonistic Theories From Aristippus to Spencer. [REVIEW]Antonino De Bella - 1895 - Ancient Philosophy (Misc) 6:470.
     
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  30. Aristippus and Xenophon as Plato's Contemporary Literary Rivals and the Role of Gymnastikè.Konstantinos Gkaleas - 2015 - E-Logos 22 (2):4-11.
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  31. Vorsokratiker Im Lateinischen Mittelalter II : Thales von Milet Im Lateinischen Diogenes Laertios, von Henricus Aristippus Bis Zur Lateinischen Editio Princeps (1472/1475). [REVIEW]Thomas Ricklin - 2011 - In Oliver Primavesi & Katharina Luchner (eds.), The Presocratics From the Latin Middle Ages to Hermann Diels. Steiner Verlag.
     
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  32. Hedonistic Theories From Aristippus to Spencer, by John Watson. [REVIEW]W. R. Sorley - 1895 - Ethics 6:385.
     
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  33. Hedonistic Theories From Aristippus to Spencer. --.John Watson - 1895 - Maclehose.
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  34. Hedonistic theories from Aristippus to Spencer.J. Watson - 1896 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 42:319-319.
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  35. The Wooden Horse: The Cyrenaics in the Theaetetus.Ugo Zilioli - 2013 - In G. Boys-Stones, C. Gill & D. El-Murr (eds.), The Platonic Art of philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this contribution, I aim to show how locating the Platonic dialogues in the intellectual context of their own time can illuminate their philosophical content. I seek to show, with reference to a specific dialogue (the Theaetetus), how Plato responds to other thinkers of his time, and also to bring out how, by reconstructing Plato’s response, we can gain deeper insight into the way that Plato shapes the structure and form of his argument in the dialogue. In particular, I argue (...)
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  36. Der Sokratesschüler Aristipp Und Die Kyrenaiker.Klaus Döring - 1988
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  37.  12
    Cyrenaics.Tim O'Keefe - 2001 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Overview of this minor Socratic school, including their skepticism and hedonistic ethics.
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  38. Pleasure and the Good Life: Concerning the Nature, Varieties, and Plausibility of Hedonism.Fred Feldman - 2004 - Clarendon Press.
    Fred Feldman's fascinating new book sets out to defend hedonism as a theory about the Good Life. He tries to show that, when carefully and charitably interpreted, certain forms of hedonism yield plausible evaluations of human lives. Feldman begins by explaining the question about the Good Life. As he understands it, the question is not about the morally good life or about the beneficial life. Rather, the question concerns the general features of the life that is good in itself for (...)
  39.  18
    The Cyrenaics.Ugo Ziloli - 2012 - Acumen Publishing.
    The Cyrenaic school of philosophy (named after its founder Aristippus’ native city of Cyrene in North Africa) flourished in the fifth and fourth centuries BCE. Ugo Zilioli’s book provides the first book-length introduction to the school in English. The book begins by introducing the main figures of the Cyrenaic school beginning with Aristippus and by setting them into their historical context. Once the reader is familiar with those figures and with the genealogy of the school, the book offers (...)
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  40.  16
    Anaxarchus on Indifference, Happiness, and Convention.Tim O'Keefe - forthcoming - In David Wolfsdorf (ed.), Ancient Greek Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Anaxarchus accompanied Pyrrho on Alexander the Great’s expedition to India and was known as “the Happy Man” because of his impassivity and contentment. Our sources on his philosophy are limited and largely consist of anecdotes about his interactions with Pyrrho and Alexander, but they allow us to reconstruct a distinctive ethical position. It overlaps with several disparate ethical traditions but is not merely a hodge-podge; it hangs together as a unified whole. Like Pyrrho, he asserts that things are indifferent in (...)
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  41.  2
    Unpublished Glosses on the Latin Phaedo Transmitted in Leiden, Universiteitsbibliotheek, BPL Ms. 64, as Sources for Henry Bate of Malines’ Speculum Divinorum.Elisa Bisanti - 2020 - Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 61:3-32.
    This article examines some interlinear and marginal notes on Henry Aristippus' translation of the Platonic Phaedo transmitted in Leiden, UL, BPL Ms. 64. The content of these notes also appears in H...
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  42. Miarą Jest Każdy Z Nas: Projekt Zwolenników Zmienności Rzeczy W Platońskim Teajtecie Na Tle Myśli Sofistycznej (Each of us is a measure. The project of advocates of change in Plato’s Theaetetus as compared with sophistic thought).Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2009 - Wydawn. Nauk. Uniwersytetu Mikołaja Kopernika.
    Each of us is a measure. The project of advocates of change in Plato’s Theaetetus as compared with sophistic thought -/- Summary -/- One of the most intriguing motives in Plato’s Theaetetus is its historical-based division of philosophy, which revolves around the concepts of rest (represented by Parmenides and his disciples) and change (represented by Protagoras, Homer, Empedocles, and Epicharmus). This unique approach gives an opportunity to reconstruct the views of marginalized trend of early Greek philosophy - so called „the (...)
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  43.  1
    Argumentos anticirenaicos en el programa cultural de la República de Platón.Claudia Mársico - 2019 - Dianoia 64 (83):3-26.
    Resumen Platón proyecta en la República un programa cultural que supone la redefinición del papel de la poesía tradicional en razón de su asociación con los regímenes democrático y tiránico. Esto, según pretendo mostrar, puede vincularse de manera legítima con la polémica anticirenaica de Platón contra Aristipo. Para ello, por un lado, exploraré los rasgos del biotipo tiránico y su régimen concomitante en la República VIII-IX y, por otro, analizaré sus vínculos con los planteamientos anticirenaicos en el Gorgias. Este examen (...)
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  44.  10
    Cleombrotus of Ambracia: Interpretations of a Suicide From Callimachus to Agathias.G. D. Williams - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (01):154-.
    At Phaedo 59b Echecrates asks Phaedo who was present on the day when Socrates drank the hemlock in prison. Various Athenians are named , then various foreigners , but when Echecrates subsequently asks if two other foreigners, Aristippus and Cleombrotus, were present, Phaedo replies that they were said to be in Aegina . After this fleeting reference to Cleombrotus, Plato does not mention him again in the Phaedo or any other dialogue; and yet in later antiquity a certain Cleombrotus (...)
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  45.  23
    Status, Pay, and Pleasure in the De Architectura of Vitruvius.Masterson Mark - 2004 - American Journal of Philology 125 (3):387-416.
    This article seeks to show the effect that Vitruvius’ probable social status had on the contents of the De Architectura. The education proposed for the architect, the receipt of a wage, and pleasure all shape the treatise in significant ways. The article supplements these discussions with a close reading of a section of the De Architectura hitherto neglected in the secondary literature: the cameo appearance of Aristippus in the preface to Book 6. Vitruvius arguably uses the figure of (...), the pleasure-loving philosopher whom Vitruvius offers to the reader as a stand-in for the architect, to focus and negotiate further the issues of status, pay, and pleasure. (shrink)
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  46.  28
    Un extranjero en su propia tierra: Aristipo como modelo del Ápolisaristotélico.María Florencia Zayas - 2013 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 18:124-147.
    El debate en torno a Aristipo de Cirene, cuya concepción de la felicidad coloca en el centro de la escena al placer, pone en tela de juicio las afirmaciones propias de aquellas éticas nucleadas bajo el epíteto de eudemonistas. Con el desplazamiento de la felicidad del sitial del fin, Aristipo reformula la dimensión ética tradicional: a través del ejercicio de la enkráteia, y lejos de caer en un relativismo subjetivista, intenta construir una ética que tenga como base un objetivismo gnoseológico. (...)
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  47.  15
    O Conceito Grego da Egkýklios Paideía E Sua Difusão No Período Helenístico.Miguel Spinelli - 2016 - HYBRIS: Revista de Filosofía 7 (1):31-58.
    Este artigo se ocupa com o conceito da egkýklios paideía com o qual os gregos definiam o período ou ciclo de escolaridade oferecida à criança tendo em vista a capacitação do uso do intelecto e a qualificação profissional, cívica e humana. O artigo busca explicitar o conceito a partir da opinião dos filósofos ancestrais e também da concepção que se difundiu no período helenístico. Relativo aos filósofos ancestrais, o artigo analisa uma mesma referência atribuída a Górgias, Aristipo e Bíon, com (...)
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  48.  23
    Middle Platonism and Neoplatonism: The Latin Tradition.Lawrence P. Schrenk - 1988 - Review of Metaphysics 41 (4):830-831.
    In his study of this neglected tradition, Stephen Gersh presents a thorough analysis of early medieval Platonism. His central interest is the transmission of Greek philosophy to the West. He argues against any significant direct transmission of Platonic texts; for instance, the translations by Aristippus are late and uninfluential, and even the partial translation of the Timaeus by Calcidius is so overwhelmed by the accompanying commentary that one cannot truly speak of an unmediated, "direct" transmission. Thus, Gersh focuses on (...)
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  49.  18
    The Greeks on Pleasure.Ann M. Wiles - 1985 - Review of Metaphysics 38 (3):627-629.
    This work is a critical history of ancient Greek accounts of pleasure from the pre-Socratics down to Epicurus and the early Stoics. Four natural divisions may be distinguished: The pre-Platonic background containing the didactic tradition, the physiological tradition, and the evaluative accounts of Democritus, Socrates, and Aristippus; Plato's theory and its development; Aristotle's theory, including a discussion of the views of Speusippus and Eudoxus; and, the post-Aristotelian accounts of Epicurus and the early Stoics.
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  50.  27
    The Epistemology of the Cyrenaic School. [REVIEW]R. M. Dancy - 2003 - Philosophical Review 112 (3):409-413.
    Aristippus of Cyrene was one of Socrates’ associates; he appears in Xenophon’s Memorabilia, where in 2.1.1 Socrates is said to have thought him “quite undisciplined” in matters of food, drink, and sex. Whether he himself was a philosophical hedonist or not is open to discussion; at any rate, the Cyrenaics who succeeded him are supposed to have accepted a variety of hedonism. But they are also supposed to have accepted something that looks like skepticism: we can have knowledge only (...)
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