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  1. added 2019-03-21
    T. Wareh The Theory and Practice of Life: Isocrates and the Philosophers. Cambridge MA and London: Harvard University Press, . Pp. Viii + 236. £18.95. 9780674067134. [REVIEW]Monte Ransome Johnson - 2014 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 134:262-263.
    Review of a recent monograph arguing that an analysis of the works of Isocrates is necessary to get a clear view of mid-fourth-century B.C. philosophy, including Plato and Aristotle.
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  2. added 2018-10-23
    Socratic Philosophers of Law.Roderick Long - 2007 - In Fred D. Miller Jr & Carrie-Ann Biondi (eds.), A Treatise of Legal Philosophy and General Jurisprudence, Volume 6: A History of the Philosophy of Law from the Ancient Greeks to the Scholastics. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer. pp. 35-56.
  3. added 2018-10-09
    Diogenes the Cynic on Law and World Citizenship.Christopher Paone - 2018 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 35 (2):478 – 498.
    Against the traditional reading of Cynic cosmopolitanism, this essay advances the thesis that Diogenes’ world citizenship is a positive claim supported by philosophical argument and philosophical example. Evidence in favor of this thesis is a new interpretation of Diogenes’ syllogistic argument concerning law (nomos) (D.L. 6.72). Important to the argument are an understanding of Diogenes’ philanthropic character and his moral imperative to ‘re-stamp the currency’. Whereas Socrates understands his care as attached specially to Athens, Diogenes’ philosophical mission and form of (...)
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  4. added 2018-09-18
    False Idles: The Politics of the "Quiet Life".Eric Brown - 2008 - In Ryan Balot (ed.), A Companion to Greek and Roman Political Thought. Oxford, UK: pp. 485-500.
    The dominant Greek and Roman ideology held that the best human life required engaging in politics, on the grounds that the human good is shared, not private, and that the activities central to this shared good are those of traditional politics. This chapter surveys three ways in which philosophers challenged this ideology, defended a withdrawal from or transformation of traditional politics, and thus rethought what politics could be. Plato and Aristotle accept the ideology's two central commitments but insist that a (...)
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  5. added 2018-09-18
    Hellenistic Cosmopolitanism.Eric Brown - 2006 - In Mary Louise Gill & Pierre Pellegrin (eds.), A Companion to Ancient Philosophy. Oxford, UK: pp. 549-558.
    This chapter surveys the origins and development in Greek philosophy of the thought that living well requires living as a citizen of the world.
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  6. added 2018-09-02
    Plato's Statesman and Xenophon's Cyrus.Carol Atack - 2018 - In Gabriel Danzig, Donald Morrison & David M. Johnson (eds.), Plato and Xenophon: comparative studies. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 510-543.
    This paper examines the relationship between the political thought of Plato and Xenophon, by positioning both as post-Socratic political theorists. It seeks to show that Xenophon and Plato examine similar themes and participate in a shared discourse in their later political thought, and in particular, that Plato is responding to Xenophon, with the Statesman exploring similar themes to Xenophon’s Cyropaedia, which itself responds to sections of Plato’s Republic. Both writers explore the themes of the shepherd king and the kairos as (...)
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  7. added 2018-07-17
    Cynics.William Desmond & Steven Gerrard - 2008 - University of California Press.
    Far from being pessimistic or nihilistic, as modern uses of the term "cynic" suggest, the ancient Cynics were astonishingly optimistic regarding human nature. They believed that if one simplified one's life—giving up all unnecessary possessions, desires, and ideas—and lived in the moment as much as possible, one could regain one's natural goodness and happiness. It was a life exemplified most famously by the eccentric Diogenes, nicknamed "the Dog," and his followers, called dog-philosophers, _kunikoi, _or Cynics. Rebellious, self-willed, and ornery but (...)
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  8. added 2018-07-17
    The Greek Praise of Poverty: The Origins of Ancient Cynicism.William D. Desmond - 2006 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    "Rich in new and stimulating ideas, and based on the breadth of reading and depth of knowledge which its wide-ranging subject matter requires, _The Greek Praise of Poverty_ argues impressively and cogently for a relocation of Cynic philosophy into the mainstream of Greek ideas on material prosperity, work, happiness, and power." —_A. Thomas Cole, Professor Emeritus of Classics, Yale University _ "This clear, well-written book offers scholars and students an accessible account of the philosophy of Cynicism, particularly with regard to (...)
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  9. added 2018-07-17
    The Cynics the Cynic Movement in Antiquity and its Legacy.R. Bracht Branham & Marie-Odile Goulet-Cazé (eds.) - 1996 - University of California Press.
    This collection of essays—the first of its kind in English—brings together the work of an international group of scholars examining the entire tradition associated with the ancient Cynics. The essays give a history of the movement as well as a state-of-the-art account of the literary, philosophical and cultural significance of Cynicism from antiquity to the present. Arguably the most original and influential branch of the Socratic tradition, Cynicism has become the focus of renewed scholarly interest in recent years, thanks to (...)
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  10. added 2018-06-21
    Review of Warren, The Pleasures of Reason Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists. [REVIEW]Tim O'Keefe - 2015 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  11. added 2018-06-06
    Cynics.Eric Brown - 2013 - In Frisbee Sheffield & James Warren (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Ancient Philosophy. London, UK: Routledge. pp. 399-408.
    This overview attempts to explain how we can come to an account of Cynicism and what that account should look like.
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  12. added 2018-04-05
    The People of Plato a Prosopography of Plato and Other Socratics.Debra Nails - 2002 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    _The People of Plato_ is the first study since 1823 devoted exclusively to the identification of, and relationships among, the individuals represented in the complete Platonic corpus. It provides details of their lives, and it enables one to consider the persons of Plato's works, and those of other Socratics, within a nexus of important political, social, and familial relationships. Debra Nails makes a broad spectrum of scholarship accessible to the non-specialist. She distinguishes what can be stated confidently from what remains (...)
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  13. added 2017-12-12
    The Logical Structure of Socrates’ Expert-Analogies.Petter Sandstad - 2017 - In Alessandro Stavru & Christopher Moore (eds.), Socrates and the Socratic Dialogue. Leiden: Brill. pp. 319-335.
    Socrates’ expert-analogies is frequent both in Plato’s dialogues and in the Socratic writings of Xenophon, and is also ascribed to Socrates by Aristotle and Aeschines. Socrates makes an analogy from a non-controversial expert (or an expertise) like the cobbler or ship-captain, to another (often controversial) expert (or expertise) like the statesman. This paper defends an interpretation of the expert-analogy as valid deductions. It infers from one type of expert (such as the ship-captain) to another type of expert (such as the (...)
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  14. added 2017-07-06
    The Lantern of Diogenes "The Lantern".Jenny Lind Porter - 1954 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 35 (1):4.
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  15. added 2017-07-06
    Diogenes of Sinope.Farrand Sayre - 1940 - Philosophical Review 49:273.
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  16. added 2017-07-06
    Diogenes of Sinope.Edmund Ziegelmayer - 1939 - Modern Schoolman 17 (1):18-18.
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  17. added 2017-07-05
    The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists by James Warren.Giulia Bonasio - 2016 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):556-557.
  18. added 2017-07-05
    Diogenes of Synope: Fragments.Andrej Kalas - 2011 - Filozofia 66 (6):577-590.
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  19. added 2017-07-05
    Two Sayings of Diogenes in Comedy.Juan Cruces - 2004 - Hermes 132 (2):248-252.
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  20. added 2017-07-05
    Diogenes and Delphi.Percy Gardner - 1893 - The Classical Review 7 (10):437-439.
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  21. added 2017-06-24
    Review of The Birth of Hedonism: The Cyrenaic Philosophers and Pleasure as a Way of Life. [REVIEW]Tim O'Keefe - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (1):185-192.
  22. added 2017-06-22
    Aristippus and Xenophon as Plato’s Contemporary Literary Rivals and the Role of Gymnastikè (Γυμναστική).Konstantinos Gkaleas - 2015 - E-Logos Electronic Journal for Philosophy 22:4-11.
    Plato was a Socrates’ friend and disciple, but he wasn’t the only one. No doubt, Socrates had many followers, however, the majority of their work is lost. Was there any antagonism among his followers? Who succeeded in interpreting Socrates? Who could be considered as his successor? Of course, we don’t know if these questions emerged after the death of Socrates, but the Greek doxography suggests that there was a literary rivalry. As we underlined earlier, most unfortunately, we can’t examine all (...)
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  23. added 2017-05-15
    Thoughts Of Socratics In The Contemporary Interpretations. [REVIEW]Artur Pacewicz - 2011 - Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia 6 (4):197-200.
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  24. added 2017-03-22
    "The Circle of Socrates: Readings in First-Generation Socratics," Ed. And Trans. George Boys-Stones and Christopher Rowe.Geoffrey Bagwell - 2014 - Teaching Philosophy 37 (2):253-257.
  25. added 2017-03-01
    Some Central Elements of Socratic Political Theory.D. Morrison - 2001 - Polis 18 (1-2):27-40.
    The fundamental concepts of Socratic political theory are statesmanship or the art of politics, and the good of the city. Important scholars have denied that, on Socrates' view, statesmanship as such is possible. But Socratic intellectualism does not commit him to the view that the methods of politics, such as legislation and punishment, are useless. The Socratic tradition in political theory is rich and varied. Among the dimensions of variation are: the relationship between statesmanship and other arts of rule; what (...)
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  26. added 2017-03-01
    On the Alleged Historical Reliability of Plato’s Apology.Donald Morrison - 2000 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 82 (3):235-265.
    A classic question of Socrates scholarship is whether Plato’s Apology is a reliable source for the philosophy of the historical Socrates. This essay argues that the Apology, like other texts, provides reliable evidence about events in Socrates’ life and general features of his character, but does not give scholars grounds for confidence that we know anything precise about the philosophical views of Socrates. Philosophical views are very sensitive to the precise wording. Through discussion of the Apology's special literary characteristics and (...)
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  27. added 2017-03-01
    On Professor VIastos’ Xenophon.Donald Morrison - 1987 - Ancient Philosophy 7:9-22.
    This paper defends Xenophon against the various arguments that Professor Vlastos has made against the historical reliability and philosophical worth of Xenophon's Socrates.
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  28. added 2017-02-14
    Zilioli The Cyrenaics. Pp. Xvi + 224. Durham: Acumen Publishing, 2012. Cased, £40. ISBN: 978-1-84465-290-7. [REVIEW]Kurt Lampe - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (1):54-56.
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  29. added 2017-01-29
    The Epistemology of the Cyrenaic School. [REVIEW]F. Alesse - 2001 - Elenchos 22 (1).
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  30. added 2017-01-29
    Hedonistic Theories From Aristippus to Spencer. [REVIEW]Antonino De Bella - 1895 - Ancient Philosophy 6:470.
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  31. added 2017-01-26
    The Cyrenaic Theory of Knowledge.Voula Tsouna McKirahan - 1992 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 10:161-192.
  32. added 2017-01-26
    The Dates of the Vases Called 'Cyrenaic'.J. P. Droop - 1910 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 30:1.
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  33. added 2017-01-26
    Two Cyrenaic Kylikes.J. P. Droop - 1908 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 28:175.
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  34. added 2017-01-17
    Could the Cyrenaics Live an Ethical Life? Jules Vuillemin’s Answer.Ugo Zilioli - 2016 - Philosophia Scientae 20:29-48.
    Cet article s’attache à comprendre si les cyrénaïques étaient susceptibles d’être attaqués moyennant l’objection d’inactivité et, si oui, comment ils auraient pu essayer d’y répondre et quel type de vision morale ils auraient pu essayer de défendre. En traitant de ces questions, j’évaluerai la légitimité de l’interprétation du scepticisme cyrénaïque offerte par Jules Vuillemin. Je confirmerai ainsi la plausibilité de son interprétation et développerai en même temps l’exploration de la nature et de la portée de la philosophie cyrénaïque.
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  35. added 2017-01-17
    CHAPTER 2. Cyrene and the Cyrenaics: A Historical and Biographical Overview.Kurt Lampe - 2014 - In The Birth of Hedonism: The Cyrenaic Philosophers and Pleasure as a Way of Life. Princeton University Press. pp. 12-25.
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  36. added 2017-01-17
    The Epistemology of the Cyrenaic School.Voula Tsouna - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Cyrenaic school was a fourth-century BC philosophical movement, related both to the Socratic tradition and to Greek Scepticism. In ethics, Cyrenaic hedonism can be seen as one of many attempts made by the associates of Socrates and their followers to endorse his ethical outlook and to explore the implications of his method. In epistemology, there are close philosophical links between the Cyrenaics and the Sceptics, both Pyrrhonists and Academics. There are further links with modern philosophy as well, for the (...)
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  37. added 2017-01-05
    Susan H. Prince, Antisthenes of Athens: Texts, Translations, and Commentary. Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Sean McConnell - 2016 - Philosophy in Review 36 (5):218-219.
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  38. added 2016-12-12
    The Annicerean Cyrenaics on Friendship and Habitual Good Will.Tim O’Keefe - 2017 - Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 62 (3):305-318.
    Unlike mainstream Cyrenaics, the Annicereans deny that friendship is chosen only because of its usefulness. Instead, the wise person cares for her friend and endures pains for him because of her goodwill and love. Nonetheless, the Annicereans maintain that your own pleasure is the telos and that a friend’s happiness isn’t intrinsically choiceworthy. Their position appears internally inconsistent or to attribute doublethink to the wise person. But we can avoid these problems. We have good textual grounds to attribute to the (...)
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  39. added 2016-12-12
    Tyrannie et royauté selon le Socrate de Xénophon.Donald Morrison - 2004 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 69 (2):177.
    Cette étude examine la conception de la royauté et de la tyrannie chez le Socrate de Xénophon, et la compare à celles qui sont défendues par Aristote, le Socrate de Platon, et d’autres. Le Socrate de Xénophon soutient que le consentement des gouvernés et le règne de la loi sont les caractéristiques qui distinguent un roi d’un tyran, alors qu’Aristote soutient que la différence tient plutôt à la nature des intérêts qui sont poursuivis, selon qu’il s’agit des intérêts des sujets, (...)
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  40. added 2016-12-09
    Socratic and Non-Socratic Philosophy: A Note on Xenophon's "Memorabilia", 1.1.13 and 14.Laurence Berns - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 28 (1):85 - 88.
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  41. added 2016-12-05
    Aristippus & Others.Hugh Chandler - manuscript
    This 'paper' was intended as the first chapter of a book. It sketches Aristippus'theory of ethics, and discusses various objections to it (Plato, Aristotle, etc.).
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  42. added 2016-12-05
    Aristotle. [REVIEW]B. J. - 1960 - Review of Metaphysics 13 (4):704-704.
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  43. added 2016-10-12
    Cyrenaics and Epicureans on Pleasure and the Good Life: The Original Debate and Its Later Revivals.Voula Tsouna - 2016 - In Sharon Weisser & Naly Thaler (eds.), Strategies of Polemics in Greek and Roman Philosophy. Brill. pp. 113-149.
  44. added 2016-06-09
    The Birth of Hedonism: The Cyrenaic Philosophers and Pleasure as a Way of Life.Kurt Lampe - 2014 - Princeton University Press.
    According to Xenophon, Socrates tried to persuade his associate Aristippus to moderate his excessive indulgence in wine, women, and food, arguing that only hard work can bring happiness. Aristippus wasn’t convinced. Instead, he and his followers espoused the most radical form of hedonism in ancient Western philosophy. Before the rise of the better known but comparatively ascetic Epicureans, the Cyrenaics pursued a way of life in which moments of pleasure, particularly bodily pleasure, held the highest value. In The Birth of (...)
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  45. added 2016-06-07
    Socratis Et Socraticorum Reliquiae Source.Emidio Spinelli, Thomas Bénatouïl, Riccardo Chiaradonna, Tiziano Dorandi, Anna Maria Ioppolo, Carlos Lévy & Mauro Tulli (eds.) - forthcoming
    Socratis et Socraticorum Reliquiae Source presents the transcription of the collection of testimonies about Socrates and Socratics (Socratis et Socraticorum Reliquiae) originally edited by G. Giannantoni. -/- The site enable users to access texts, exploit resources, and perform queries. Notes, additional information and a legenda for a better access to the texts are also available. -/- The publication is peer-reviewed and aspire to meet the highest quality standards. The content of the site and its internet addresses are stable and can (...)
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  46. added 2016-01-11
    Désirs naturels et artificiels chez Diogène et Épicure.Simon-Pierre Chevarie-Cossette - 2015 - In Daoust Marc-Kevin (ed.), Le désir et la philosophie. Les Cahiers d'Ithaque. pp. 147.
    This article contrasts Epicurus's and Diogenes the Cynic's respective views on acceptable desires. I emphasize their appeals to nature to legitimize or de-legitimize certain types of desires.
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  47. added 2016-01-11
    Tonneau percé, tonneau habité - Calliclès et Diogène : les leçons rivales de la nature.Simon-Pierre Chevarie-Cossette - 2015 - Philosophie Antique 15:149-178.
    Comme de nombreux penseurs antiques avant et après eux et contrairement à Socrate, Calliclès et Diogène ont déclaré avoir fondé leur éthique sur l’observation de la nature. Et pourtant, les deux discours normatifs qui sont tirés d’une nature que l’on pourrait a priori croire être la même sont on ne peut plus opposés. Calliclès croit que l’homme est appelé à dominer autrui ; Diogène pense plutôt qu’il doit se dominer lui-même ; le premier est un hédoniste débridé, le second croit (...)
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  48. added 2015-08-17
    The Economicus of Xenophon Pierre Chantraine: Xénophon, Économique. Texte Établi Et Traduit. (Collection Budé.) Pp. 119. Paris: 'Les Belles Lettres', 1949. Paper. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1951 - The Classical Review 1 (01):21-23.
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  49. added 2015-07-11
    The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists.James Warren - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Human lives are full of pleasures and pains. And humans are creatures that are able to think: to learn, understand, remember and recall, plan and anticipate. Ancient philosophers were interested in both of these facts and, what is more, were interested in how these two facts are related to one another. There appear to be, after all, pleasures and pains associated with learning and inquiring, recollecting and anticipating. We enjoy finding something out. We are pained to discover that a belief (...)
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  50. added 2015-07-11
    Epicureans and Cyrenaics on Pleasure as a Pathos.James Warren - 2013 - In S. Marchand & F. Verde (eds.), Épicurisme et Scepticisme. pp. 127-44.
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1 — 50 / 112