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  1. The Epistemology of the Cyrenaic School. [REVIEW]F. Alesse - 2001 - Elenchos 22 (1).
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  2. Review: The Heirs of Socrates. [REVIEW]Julia Annas - 1988 - Phronesis 33 (1):100 - 112.
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  3. The Circle of Socrates: Readings in First-Generation Socratics [Review]. [REVIEW]Geoffrey Bagwell - 2014 - Teaching Philosophy 37 (2):253-257.
  4. "The Circle of Socrates: Readings in First-Generation Socratics," Ed. And Trans. George Boys-Stones and Christopher Rowe.Geoffrey Bagwell - 2014 - Teaching Philosophy 37 (2):253-257.
  5. Socratic and Non-Socratic Philosophy: A Note on Xenophon's "Memorabilia", 1.1.13 and 14.Laurence Berns - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 28 (1):85 - 88.
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  6. Socratic and Non-Socratic Philosophy.Laurence Berns - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 28 (1):85-88.
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  7. The Epistemology of the Cyrenaic School. [REVIEW]Richard Bett - 1999 - Ancient Philosophy 19 (2):404-407.
  8. The Cynic and the Statue.E. K. Borthwick - 2001 - Classical Quarterly 51 (2):494-498.
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  9. Socrates, Socratics, and the Word B E E Aim N.E. K. Borthwick - 2001 - Classical Quarterly 51 (1):297-301.
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  10. Aristippus.Hugh Chandler - manuscript
    This was an early chapter of what was later turned out to be a very different book. It sketches Aristippus’ theory of ethics and some of the arguments offered by others (e.g. Plato and Aristotle) in opposition to that theory.
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  11. Aristippus & Others.Hugh Chandler - manuscript
    This 'paper' was intended as the first chapter of a book. It sketches Aristippus'theory of ethics, and discusses various objections to it (Plato, Aristotle, etc.).
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  12. Désirs naturels et artificiels chez Diogène et Épicure.Simon-Pierre Chevarie-Cossette - 2015 - In Daoust Marc-Kevin (ed.), Le désir et la philosophie. Les Cahiers d'Ithaque. pp. 147.
    This article contrasts Epicurus's and Diogenes the Cynic's respective views on acceptable desires. I emphasize their appeals to nature to legitimize or de-legitimize certain types of desires.
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  13. Tonneau percé, tonneau habité - Calliclès et Diogène : les leçons rivales de la nature.Simon-Pierre Chevarie-Cossette - 2015 - Philosophie Antique 15:149-178.
    Comme de nombreux penseurs antiques avant et après eux et contrairement à Socrate, Calliclès et Diogène ont déclaré avoir fondé leur éthique sur l’observation de la nature. Et pourtant, les deux discours normatifs qui sont tirés d’une nature que l’on pourrait a priori croire être la même sont on ne peut plus opposés. Calliclès croit que l’homme est appelé à dominer autrui ; Diogène pense plutôt qu’il doit se dominer lui-même ; le premier est un hédoniste débridé, le second croit (...)
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  14. H. D. Rankin: Sophists, Socratics and Cynics. Pp. 263. London and Canberra: Croom Helm; Totowa, New Jersey: Barnes and Noble Books, 1983. £17.95. [REVIEW]J. L. Creed - 1985 - The Classical Review 35 (01):198-199.
  15. Sayings and Anecdotes: With Other Popular Moralists.Diogenes the Cynic - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    A unique edition of the sayings of Diogenes, whose biting wit and eccentricity inspired the anecdotes that express his Cynic philosophy. It includes the accounts of his immediate successors, such as Crates and Hipparchia, and the witty moral preacher Bion. The contrasting teachings of the Cyrenaics and the hedonistic Aristippos complete the volume.
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  16. The Epistemology of the Cyrenaic School. [REVIEW]R. M. Dancy - 2003 - Philosophical Review 112 (3):409-413.
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  17. Edonistic Theories From Aristippus to Spencer. [REVIEW]Antonino De Bella - 1895 - Ancient Philosophy 6:470.
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  18. Der Sokratesschüler Aristipp Und Die Kyrenaiker.Klaus Döring - 1988
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  19. The Dates of the Vases Called 'Cyrenaic'.J. P. Droop - 1910 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 30:1.
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  20. Two Cyrenaic Kylikes.J. P. Droop - 1908 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 28:175.
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  21. The Subjective Appearance of Cyrenaic Pathe.Gail Fine - 2004 - In V. Karasmanis (ed.), Socrates: 2400 Hundred Years Since His Death. European Cultural Center of Delphi.
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  22. Subjectivity, Ancient and Modern: The Cyrenaics, Sextus, and Descartes.Gail Fine - 2003 - In J. Miller & B. Inwood (eds.), Hellenistic and Early Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
  23. Critical Review. Two Studies in the Ancient Academy. R.M. Dancy. [REVIEW]Gail Fine - 1992 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (3):393-410.
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  24. Aristippus and Xenophon as Plato’s Contemporary Literary Rivals and the Role of Gymnastikè (Γυμναστική).Konstantinos Gkaleas - 2015 - E-Logos Electronic Journal for Philosophy 22:4-11.
    Plato was a Socrates’ friend and disciple, but he wasn’t the only one. No doubt, Socrates had many followers, however, the majority of their work is lost. Was there any antagonism among his followers? Who succeeded in interpreting Socrates? Who could be considered as his successor? Of course, we don’t know if these questions emerged after the death of Socrates, but the Greek doxography suggests that there was a literary rivalry. As we underlined earlier, most unfortunately, we can’t examine all (...)
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  25. The Cyrenaics'.D. Glidden - 1975 - American Philosophical Quarterly Monograph Series 9:113-140.
  26. Managing Mental Pain: Epicurus Vs. Aristippus on the Pre-Rehearsal of Future Ills.Margaret Graver - 2002 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 17 (1):155-184.
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  27. Socrates Jean Humbert: Socrate Et les Petits Socratiques. Pp. 293. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1967. Paper, 24 Fr. [REVIEW]Norman Gulley - 1968 - The Classical Review 18 (03):290-292.
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  28. Ecce Iterum Antisthenes H. Kesters: Antisthène de la Dialectique: étude critique et exégétique sur le XXVI' discours de Thémistius. Pp. 236. Louvain: Bibliothèque de l'Université, 1935. Paper, 50 francs. [REVIEW]R. Hackforth - 1935 - The Classical Review 49 (06):223-224.
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  29. J. Sykutris: Die Briefe des Sokrates und der Sokratiker. Pp. 125. (Studien z. Gesch. u. Kultur des Altertums. XVIII. Band. 2. Heft.) Paderborn: Schöningh, 1933. Paper, RM. 680. [REVIEW]R. Hackforth - 1934 - The Classical Review 48 (04):147-.
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  30. The Epistemology of the Cyrenaic School. [REVIEW]R. J. Hankinson - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (3):720-723.
  31. Aristippus Against Happiness.T. H. Irwin - 1991 - The Monist 74 (1):55-82.
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  32. Aristotle. [REVIEW]B. J. - 1960 - Review of Metaphysics 13 (4):704-704.
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  33. Aristippus at the Crossroads: The Politics of Pleasure in Xenophon's Memorabilia.David Johnson - 2009 - Polis 26 (2):204-222.
    In two passages from Xenophon's Memorabilia, Socrates refutes Aristippus, first by a rather brutal brand of Realpolitik , then by refusing to answer Aristippus' questions about the good and the beautiful . This article argues that the nasty politics that emerge in Memorabilia 2.1 are not Socratic, but rather the natural consequence of Aristippean hedonism. Political considerations of another sort drive Socrates' tactics in Memorabilia 3.8, where his evasive manoeuvres are driven by his desire to avoid a direct confrontation with (...)
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  34. The Economicus of Xenophon Pierre Chantraine: Xénophon, Économique. Texte Établi Et Traduit. (Collection Budé.) Pp. 119. Paris: 'Les Belles Lettres', 1949. Paper. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1951 - The Classical Review 1 (01):21-23.
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  35. CHAPTER 2. Cyrene and the Cyrenaics: A Historical and Biographical Overview.Kurt Lampe - 2014 - In The Birth of Hedonism: The Cyrenaic Philosophers and Pleasure as a Way of Life. Princeton University Press. pp. 12-25.
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  36. The Birth of Hedonism: The Cyrenaic Philosophers and Pleasure as a Way of Life.Kurt Lampe - 2014 - Princeton University Press.
    According to Xenophon, Socrates tried to persuade his associate Aristippus to moderate his excessive indulgence in wine, women, and food, arguing that only hard work can bring happiness. Aristippus wasn’t convinced. Instead, he and his followers espoused the most radical form of hedonism in ancient Western philosophy. Before the rise of the better known but comparatively ascetic Epicureans, the Cyrenaics pursued a way of life in which moments of pleasure, particularly bodily pleasure, held the highest value. In The Birth of (...)
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  37. Zilioli The Cyrenaics. Pp. Xvi + 224. Durham: Acumen Publishing, 2012. Cased, £40. ISBN: 978-1-84465-290-7.Kurt Lampe - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (1):54-56.
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  38. La Figure d'Ulysse Chez les Socratiques : Socrate Polutropos.David Lévystone - 2005 - Phronesis 50 (3):181-214.
    At the end of the fifth century B.C.E., the character of Odysseus was scorned by most of the Athenians: he illustrated the archetype of the demagogic, unscrupulous and ambitious politicians that had led Athens to its doom. Against this common doxa, the most important disciples of Socrates (Antisthenes, Plato, Xenophon) rehabilitate the hero and admire his temperance and his courage. But it is most surprising to see that, in spite of Odysseus' lies and deceit, these philosophers, who condemn steadfastly the (...)
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  39. La Figure d'Ulysse Chez les Socratiques: Socrate Polutropos.David Lévystone - 2005 - Phronesis 50 (2005):181 - 214.
    At the end of the fifth century B.C.E., the character of Odysseus was scorned by most of the Athenians: he illustrated the archetype of the demagogic, unscrupulous and ambitious politicians that had led Athens to its doom. Against this common doxa, the most important disciples of Socrates (Antisthenes, Plato, Xenophon) rehabilitate the hero and admire his temperance and his courage. But it is most surprising to see that, in spite of Odysseus' lies and deceit, these philosophers, who condemn steadfastly the (...)
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  40. Cyrenaic Epistemology V. Tsouna: The Epistemology of the Cyrenaic School . Pp. XIX + 180. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. Cased, £30. Isbn: 0-521-62207-. [REVIEW]A. A. Long - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (01):151-.
  41. Cyrenaics.A. A. Long - 1992 - In Lawrence C. Becker & Charlotte B. Becker (eds.), The Encyclopedia of Ethics. Garland Publishing. pp. 1--370.
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  42. The Life of Aristippus.Wolfgang-Rainer Mann - 1996 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 78 (2):97-119.
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  43. Susan H. Prince, Antisthenes of Athens: Texts, Translations, and Commentary. Reviewed By.Sean McConnell - 2016 - Philosophy in Review 36 (5):218-219.
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  44. Some Central Elements of Socratic Political Theory.D. Morrison - 2001 - Polis 18 (1-2):27-40.
    The fundamental concepts of Socratic political theory are statesmanship or the art of politics, and the good of the city. Important scholars have denied that, on Socrates' view, statesmanship as such is possible. But Socratic intellectualism does not commit him to the view that the methods of politics, such as legislation and punishment, are useless. The Socratic tradition in political theory is rich and varied. Among the dimensions of variation are: the relationship between statesmanship and other arts of rule; what (...)
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  45. Tyrannie et royauté selon le Socrate de Xénophon.Donald Morrison - 2004 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 69 (2):177.
    Cette étude examine la conception de la royauté et de la tyrannie chez le Socrate de Xénophon, et la compare à celles qui sont défendues par Aristote, le Socrate de Platon, et d’autres. Le Socrate de Xénophon soutient que le consentement des gouvernés et le règne de la loi sont les caractéristiques qui distinguent un roi d’un tyran, alors qu’Aristote soutient que la différence tient plutôt à la nature des intérêts qui sont poursuivis, selon qu’il s’agit des intérêts des sujets, (...)
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  46. On the Alleged Historical Reliability of Plato's Apology.Donald Morrison - 2000 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 82 (3):235-265.
    A classic question of Socrates scholarship is whether Plato’s Apology is a reliable source for the philosophy of the historical Socrates. This essay argues that the Apology, like other texts, provides reliable evidence about events in Socrates’ life and general features of his character, but does not give scholars grounds for confidence that we know anything precise about the philosophical views of Socrates. Philosophical views are very sensitive to the precise wording. Through discussion of the Apology's special literary characteristics and (...)
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  47. On Professor VIastos’ Xenophon.Donald Morrison - 1987 - Ancient Philosophy 7:9-22.
    This paper defends Xenophon against the various arguments that Professor Vlastos has made against the historical reliability and philosophical worth of Xenophon's Socrates.
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  48. On Professor Vlastos' Xenophon.Donald Morrison - 1987 - Ancient Philosophy 7:9.
    This paper defends Xenophon against the various arguments that Professor Vlastos has made against the historical reliability and philosophical worth of Xenophon's Socrates.
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  49. Diogenes the Cynic: The War Against the World.Luis E. Navia - 2005 - Humanity Books.
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  50. The Annicerean Cyrenaics on Friendship and Habitual Good Will.Tim O'Keefe - forthcoming - Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 62 (3).
    Unlike mainstream Cyrenaics, the Annicereans deny that friendship is chosen only because of its usefulness. Instead, the wise person cares for her friend and endures pains for him because of her goodwill and love. Nonetheless, the Annicereans maintain that your own pleasure is the telos and that a friend’s happiness isn’t intrinsically choiceworthy. Their position appears internally inconsistent or to attribute doublethink to the wise person. But we can avoid these problems. We have good textual grounds to attribute to the (...)
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