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1 — 50 / 115
  1. added 2020-02-13
    Arcesilaus and the Ontology of Stoic Cognition.Charles E. Snyder - 2020 - Review of Metaphysics 73 (March):455-493.
    The focus of this paper is the dispute between the Academic Arcesilaus of Pitane (ca. 316–240 BC) and the philosophy of Zeno of Citium. Scholars typically claim that Arcesilaus set out to attack Zeno’s epistemology or theory of knowledge. The framework of epistemology prevails in the modern reconstruction of Arcesilaus’s arguments. Proponents of this framework usually contend that the epistemic possibility of Stoic “cognition” or “apprehension” (κατάληψις) is the principal aim of Arcesilaus’s attack. The aim of this article is to (...)
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  2. added 2020-02-12
    The Epistemology of the Cyrenaic School.R. J. Hankinson - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (3):720-723.
    This is not a long book—but it is surprising that it is as long as it is. The Cyrenaics are one of a number of more or less shadowy philosophical schools which emerged in the Greek world in the 4th century BC and later. Well known are Plato’s Academy and Aristotle’s Lyceum; and relatively well served by the tradition are the Stoics and the Epicureans, as well as the various later varieties of sceptic; while the Cynics are remembered at least (...)
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  3. added 2019-07-11
    Sinoplu Filozof Diogenes (Diyojen) ve Etik Anlayışı.Alper Bilgehan Yardımcı - 2018 - Berikan Yayınevi.
    Diogenes of Sinope, bilinen adıyla Diogenes ya da Sinoplu Diyojen’e yönelik yapılan bu çalışmada amacım, Dioegenes’in yaşamının, felsefi duruşunun ve benimsediği etik kuralların kapsamlı ve belgelenmiş bir şekilde sunulmasıdır. Diogenes’in hayatını ve öğretilerini güvenilir bir şekilde aktarmak aşırı derecede zordur, çünkü diğer antik filozoflardan ayrı olarak, onun yaşamına ilişkin güvenilir kaynaklar bulmak oldukça sınırlıdır. Ayrıca, fıçının içinde yaşayan bir Kinikli’ye yönelik ortaya konulmuş birçok kurmaca anekdot ile uğraşılması gerekmektedir. Güvenilir bilginin azlığı ve belgesiz atıfların yarattığı zorluklara rağmen, yine de birçok (...)
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  4. added 2019-06-07
    Ecce Iterum Antisthenes. [REVIEW]R. Hackforth - 1935 - The Classical Review 49 (6):223-224.
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  5. added 2019-06-07
    Aeschines the Socratic. [REVIEW]A. C. Pearson - 1913 - The Classical Review 27 (8):269-270.
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  6. added 2019-06-06
    The Epistemology of the Cyrenaic School, by Voula Tsouna.Richard Bett - 1999 - Ancient Philosophy 19 (2):404-406.
  7. added 2019-06-06
    Die Kyniker in der Modernen Forschung: Aufsätze MIT Einführung Und Bibliographie. [REVIEW]Michael G. Sollenberger - 1994 - Ancient Philosophy 14 (2):403-406.
  8. added 2019-06-06
    Sophists, Socratics and Cynics. [REVIEW]J. L. Creed - 1985 - The Classical Review 35 (1):198-199.
  9. added 2019-05-27
    Cicero Reading the Cyrenaics on the Anticipation of Future Harms.Katharine R. O'Reilly - 2019 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (2):431-443.
    A common reading of the Cyrenaics is that they are a school of extreme hedonist presentists, recognising only the pleasure of the present moment, and advising against turning our attention to past or future pleasure or pain. Yet they have some strange advice which tells followers to anticipate future harms in order to lessen the unexpectedness of them when they occur. It’s a puzzle, then, how they can consistently hold the attitude they do to our concern with our present selves, (...)
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  10. added 2019-05-27
    The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists, Written by James Warren. [REVIEW]Emily Austin - 2017 - Polis 34 (1):168-171.
  11. added 2019-05-14
    The Socratics - Paul A. Vander Waerdt : The Socratic Movement. Pp. X+406. Ithaca, NY, London: Cornell University Press, 1994. £37.50. [REVIEW]Robin Waterfield - 1995 - The Classical Review 45 (2):281-282.
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  12. added 2019-03-21
    T. Wareh The Theory and Practice of Life: Isocrates and the Philosophers. Cambridge MA and London: Harvard University Press, . Pp. Viii + 236. £18.95. 9780674067134. [REVIEW]Monte Ransome Johnson - 2014 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 134:262-263.
    Review of a recent monograph arguing that an analysis of the works of Isocrates is necessary to get a clear view of mid-fourth-century B.C. philosophy, including Plato and Aristotle.
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  13. added 2018-10-23
    Socratic Philosophers of Law.Roderick Long - 2007 - In Fred D. Miller Jr & Carrie-Ann Biondi (eds.), A Treatise of Legal Philosophy and General Jurisprudence, Volume 6: A History of the Philosophy of Law from the Ancient Greeks to the Scholastics. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer. pp. 35-56.
  14. added 2018-10-09
    Diogenes the Cynic on Law and World Citizenship.Christopher Paone - 2018 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 35 (2):478 – 498.
    Against the traditional reading of Cynic cosmopolitanism, this essay advances the thesis that Diogenes’ world citizenship is a positive claim supported by philosophical argument and philosophical example. Evidence in favor of this thesis is a new interpretation of Diogenes’ syllogistic argument concerning law (nomos) (D.L. 6.72). Important to the argument are an understanding of Diogenes’ philanthropic character and his moral imperative to ‘re-stamp the currency’. Whereas Socrates understands his care as attached specially to Athens, Diogenes’ philosophical mission and form of (...)
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  15. added 2018-09-18
    False Idles: The Politics of the "Quiet Life".Eric Brown - 2008 - In Ryan Balot (ed.), A Companion to Greek and Roman Political Thought. Oxford, UK: pp. 485-500.
    The dominant Greek and Roman ideology held that the best human life required engaging in politics, on the grounds that the human good is shared, not private, and that the activities central to this shared good are those of traditional politics. This chapter surveys three ways in which philosophers challenged this ideology, defended a withdrawal from or transformation of traditional politics, and thus rethought what politics could be. Plato and Aristotle accept the ideology's two central commitments but insist that a (...)
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  16. added 2018-09-18
    Hellenistic Cosmopolitanism.Eric Brown - 2006 - In Mary Louise Gill & Pierre Pellegrin (eds.), A Companion to Ancient Philosophy. Oxford, UK: pp. 549-558.
    This chapter surveys the origins and development in Greek philosophy of the thought that living well requires living as a citizen of the world.
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  17. added 2018-09-02
    Plato's Statesman and Xenophon's Cyrus.Carol Atack - 2018 - In Gabriel Danzig, Donald Morrison & David M. Johnson (eds.), Plato and Xenophon: comparative studies. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 510-543.
    This paper examines the relationship between the political thought of Plato and Xenophon, by positioning both as post-Socratic political theorists. It seeks to show that Xenophon and Plato examine similar themes and participate in a shared discourse in their later political thought, and in particular, that Plato is responding to Xenophon, with the Statesman exploring similar themes to Xenophon’s Cyropaedia, which itself responds to sections of Plato’s Republic. Both writers explore the themes of the shepherd king and the kairos as (...)
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  18. added 2018-07-17
    Cynics.William Desmond & Steven Gerrard - 2008 - University of California Press.
    Far from being pessimistic or nihilistic, as modern uses of the term "cynic" suggest, the ancient Cynics were astonishingly optimistic regarding human nature. They believed that if one simplified one's life—giving up all unnecessary possessions, desires, and ideas—and lived in the moment as much as possible, one could regain one's natural goodness and happiness. It was a life exemplified most famously by the eccentric Diogenes, nicknamed "the Dog," and his followers, called dog-philosophers, _kunikoi, _or Cynics. Rebellious, self-willed, and ornery but (...)
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  19. added 2018-07-17
    The Greek Praise of Poverty: The Origins of Ancient Cynicism.William D. Desmond - 2006 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    "Rich in new and stimulating ideas, and based on the breadth of reading and depth of knowledge which its wide-ranging subject matter requires, _The Greek Praise of Poverty_ argues impressively and cogently for a relocation of Cynic philosophy into the mainstream of Greek ideas on material prosperity, work, happiness, and power." —_A. Thomas Cole, Professor Emeritus of Classics, Yale University _ "This clear, well-written book offers scholars and students an accessible account of the philosophy of Cynicism, particularly with regard to (...)
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  20. added 2018-07-17
    The Cynics the Cynic Movement in Antiquity and its Legacy.R. Bracht Branham & Marie-Odile Goulet-Cazé (eds.) - 1996 - University of California Press.
    This collection of essays—the first of its kind in English—brings together the work of an international group of scholars examining the entire tradition associated with the ancient Cynics. The essays give a history of the movement as well as a state-of-the-art account of the literary, philosophical and cultural significance of Cynicism from antiquity to the present. Arguably the most original and influential branch of the Socratic tradition, Cynicism has become the focus of renewed scholarly interest in recent years, thanks to (...)
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  21. added 2018-06-21
    Review of Warren, The Pleasures of Reason Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists. [REVIEW]Tim O'Keefe - 2015 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  22. added 2018-06-06
    Cynics.Eric Brown - 2013 - In James Warren & Frisbee Sheffield (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Ancient Philosophy. London, UK: Routledge. pp. 399-408.
    This overview attempts to explain how we can come to an account of Cynicism and what that account should look like. My account suggests that Cynics are identified by living like Diogenes of Sinope, and that Diogenes' way of life is characterized by distinctive twists on three Socratic commitments. The three Socratic commitments are that success in life depends on excellence of the soul; that this excellence and success are a special achievement, requiring hard work; and that this work requires (...)
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  23. added 2018-04-05
    The People of Plato a Prosopography of Plato and Other Socratics.Debra Nails - 2002 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    _The People of Plato_ is the first study since 1823 devoted exclusively to the identification of, and relationships among, the individuals represented in the complete Platonic corpus. It provides details of their lives, and it enables one to consider the persons of Plato's works, and those of other Socratics, within a nexus of important political, social, and familial relationships. Debra Nails makes a broad spectrum of scholarship accessible to the non-specialist. She distinguishes what can be stated confidently from what remains (...)
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  24. added 2017-12-12
    The Logical Structure of Socrates’ Expert-Analogies.Petter Sandstad - 2017 - In Alessandro Stavru & Christopher Moore (eds.), Socrates and the Socratic Dialogue. Leiden: Brill. pp. 319-335.
    Socrates’ expert-analogies is frequent both in Plato’s dialogues and in the Socratic writings of Xenophon, and is also ascribed to Socrates by Aristotle and Aeschines. Socrates makes an analogy from a non-controversial expert (or an expertise) like the cobbler or ship-captain, to another (often controversial) expert (or expertise) like the statesman. This paper defends an interpretation of the expert-analogy as valid deductions. It infers from one type of expert (such as the ship-captain) to another type of expert (such as the (...)
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  25. added 2017-07-06
    The Lantern of Diogenes "The Lantern".Jenny Lind Porter - 1954 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 35 (1):4.
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  26. added 2017-07-06
    Diogenes of Sinope.Farrand Sayre - 1940 - Philosophical Review 49:273.
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  27. added 2017-07-06
    Diogenes of Sinope.Edmund Ziegelmayer - 1939 - Modern Schoolman 17 (1):18-18.
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  28. added 2017-07-05
    The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists by James Warren.Giulia Bonasio - 2016 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):556-557.
  29. added 2017-07-05
    Diogenes of Synope: Fragments.Andrej Kalas - 2011 - Filozofia 66 (6):577-590.
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  30. added 2017-07-05
    Two Sayings of Diogenes in Comedy.Juan Cruces - 2004 - Hermes 132 (2):248-252.
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  31. added 2017-07-05
    Diogenes and Delphi.Percy Gardner - 1893 - The Classical Review 7 (10):437-439.
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  32. added 2017-06-24
    Review of The Birth of Hedonism: The Cyrenaic Philosophers and Pleasure as a Way of Life. [REVIEW]Tim O’Keefe - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (1):185-192.
  33. added 2017-06-22
    Aristippus and Xenophon as Plato’s Contemporary Literary Rivals and the Role of Gymnastikè (Γυμναστική).Konstantinos Gkaleas - 2015 - E-Logos Electronic Journal for Philosophy 22:4-11.
    Plato was a Socrates’ friend and disciple, but he wasn’t the only one. No doubt, Socrates had many followers, however, the majority of their work is lost. Was there any antagonism among his followers? Who succeeded in interpreting Socrates? Who could be considered as his successor? Of course, we don’t know if these questions emerged after the death of Socrates, but the Greek doxography suggests that there was a literary rivalry. As we underlined earlier, most unfortunately, we can’t examine all (...)
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  34. added 2017-05-15
    Thoughts Of Socratics In The Contemporary Interpretations. [REVIEW]Artur Pacewicz - 2011 - Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia 6 (4):197-200.
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  35. added 2017-03-22
    "The Circle of Socrates: Readings in First-Generation Socratics," Ed. And Trans. George Boys-Stones and Christopher Rowe.Geoffrey Bagwell - 2014 - Teaching Philosophy 37 (2):253-257.
  36. added 2017-03-01
    Some Central Elements of Socratic Political Theory.D. Morrison - 2001 - Polis 18 (1-2):27-40.
    The fundamental concepts of Socratic political theory are statesmanship or the art of politics, and the good of the city. Important scholars have denied that, on Socrates' view, statesmanship as such is possible. But Socratic intellectualism does not commit him to the view that the methods of politics, such as legislation and punishment, are useless. The Socratic tradition in political theory is rich and varied. Among the dimensions of variation are: the relationship between statesmanship and other arts of rule; what (...)
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  37. added 2017-03-01
    On the Alleged Historical Reliability of Plato’s Apology.Donald Morrison - 2000 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 82 (3):235-265.
    A classic question of Socrates scholarship is whether Plato’s Apology is a reliable source for the philosophy of the historical Socrates. This essay argues that the Apology, like other texts, provides reliable evidence about events in Socrates’ life and general features of his character, but does not give scholars grounds for confidence that we know anything precise about the philosophical views of Socrates. Philosophical views are very sensitive to the precise wording. Through discussion of the Apology's special literary characteristics and (...)
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  38. added 2017-03-01
    On Professor VIastos’ Xenophon.Donald Morrison - 1987 - Ancient Philosophy 7:9-22.
    This paper defends Xenophon against the various arguments that Professor Vlastos has made against the historical reliability and philosophical worth of Xenophon's Socrates.
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  39. added 2017-01-29
    The Epistemology of the Cyrenaic School. [REVIEW]F. Alesse - 2001 - Elenchos 22 (1).
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  40. added 2017-01-29
    Hedonistic Theories From Aristippus to Spencer. [REVIEW]Antonino De Bella - 1895 - Ancient Philosophy (Misc) 6:470.
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  41. added 2017-01-26
    The Cyrenaic Theory of Knowledge.Voula Tsouna McKirahan - 1992 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 10:161-192.
  42. added 2017-01-26
    The Dates of the Vases Called 'Cyrenaic'.J. P. Droop - 1910 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 30 (1):1-34.
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  43. added 2017-01-26
    Two Cyrenaic Kylikes.J. P. Droop - 1908 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 28 (2):175-179.
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  44. added 2017-01-17
    Could the Cyrenaics Live an Ethical Life? Jules Vuillemin’s Answer.Ugo Zilioli - 2016 - Philosophia Scientae 20:29-48.
    Cet article s’attache à comprendre si les cyrénaïques étaient susceptibles d’être attaqués moyennant l’objection d’inactivité et, si oui, comment ils auraient pu essayer d’y répondre et quel type de vision morale ils auraient pu essayer de défendre. En traitant de ces questions, j’évaluerai la légitimité de l’interprétation du scepticisme cyrénaïque offerte par Jules Vuillemin. Je confirmerai ainsi la plausibilité de son interprétation et développerai en même temps l’exploration de la nature et de la portée de la philosophie cyrénaïque.
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  45. added 2017-01-17
    CHAPTER 2. Cyrene and the Cyrenaics: A Historical and Biographical Overview.Kurt Lampe - 2014 - In The Birth of Hedonism: The Cyrenaic Philosophers and Pleasure as a Way of Life. Princeton University Press. pp. 12-25.
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  46. added 2017-01-17
    The Epistemology of the Cyrenaic School.Voula Tsouna - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Cyrenaic school was a fourth-century BC philosophical movement, related both to the Socratic tradition and to Greek Scepticism. In ethics, Cyrenaic hedonism can be seen as one of many attempts made by the associates of Socrates and their followers to endorse his ethical outlook and to explore the implications of his method. In epistemology, there are close philosophical links between the Cyrenaics and the Sceptics, both Pyrrhonists and Academics. There are further links with modern philosophy as well, for the (...)
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  47. added 2017-01-05
    Susan H. Prince, Antisthenes of Athens: Texts, Translations, and Commentary. Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Sean McConnell - 2016 - Philosophy in Review 36 (5):218-219.
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  48. added 2016-12-12
    The Annicerean Cyrenaics on Friendship and Habitual Good Will.Tim O’Keefe - 2017 - Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 62 (3):305-318.
    Unlike mainstream Cyrenaics, the Annicereans deny that friendship is chosen only because of its usefulness. Instead, the wise person cares for her friend and endures pains for him because of her goodwill and love. Nonetheless, the Annicereans maintain that your own pleasure is the telos and that a friend’s happiness isn’t intrinsically choiceworthy. Their position appears internally inconsistent or to attribute doublethink to the wise person. But we can avoid these problems. We have good textual grounds to attribute to the (...)
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  49. added 2016-12-12
    Tyrannie et royauté selon le Socrate de Xénophon.Donald Morrison - 2004 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 69 (2):177.
    Cette étude examine la conception de la royauté et de la tyrannie chez le Socrate de Xénophon, et la compare à celles qui sont défendues par Aristote, le Socrate de Platon, et d’autres. Le Socrate de Xénophon soutient que le consentement des gouvernés et le règne de la loi sont les caractéristiques qui distinguent un roi d’un tyran, alors qu’Aristote soutient que la différence tient plutôt à la nature des intérêts qui sont poursuivis, selon qu’il s’agit des intérêts des sujets, (...)
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  50. added 2016-12-09
    Socratic and Non-Socratic Philosophy: A Note on Xenophon’s Memorabilia, 1.1.13 and 14.Laurence Berns - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 28 (1):85 - 88.
    And he wondered whether it was not evident to them that it is not possible for human beings to discover these things [sc. divine things, τὰ δαιμόνια]. Since even those who thought most of themselves for their speaking about these things do not hold the same opinions with one another, but are disposed towards one another like madmen.
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