27 found
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  1. Rethinking "Liberal Eugenics": Reflections and Questions on Habermas on Bioethics.Bernard G. Prusak - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (6):31.
    : In the new "liberal eugenics," children could be genetically improved as long as the enhancements let children choose from among a wide range of ways to live their lives. The German political philosopher Jürgen Habermas has opened a debate with the proponents of this view. Habermas suggests that a person could not really regard her life as her own if she lived with a body that somebody else had, without asking her opinion, "enhanced" for her.
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  2.  89
    Double Effect, All Over Again: The Case of Sister Margaret McBride.Bernard G. Prusak - 2011 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (4):271-283.
    As media reports have made widely known, in November 2009, the ethics committee of St. Joseph’s Hospital in Phoenix, Arizona, permitted the abortion of an eleven-week-old fetus in order to save the life of its mother. This woman was suffering from acute pulmonary hypertension, which her doctors judged would prove fatal for both her and her previable child. The ethics committee believed abortion to be permitted in this case under the so-called principle of double effect, but Thomas J. Olmsted, the (...)
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  3.  85
    Not Good Enough Parenting: What's Wrong with the Child's Right to an “Open Future”.Bernard G. Prusak - 2008 - Social Theory and Practice 34 (2):271-291.
  4.  42
    The Costs of Procreation.Bernard G. Prusak - 2011 - Journal of Social Philosophy 42 (1):61-75.
  5. Parental Obligations and Bioethics: The Duties of a Creator.Bernard G. Prusak - 2013 - Routledge.
    This book examines the question of what parental obligations procreators incur by bringing children into being. Prusak argues that parents, as procreators, have obligations regarding future children that constrain the liberty of would-be parents to do as they wish. Moreover, these obligations go beyond simply respecting a child’s rights. He addresses in turn the ethics of adoption, child support, gamete donation, surrogacy, prenatal genetic enhancement, and public responsibility for children.
     
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  6.  50
    Breaking the Bond: Abortion and the Grounds of Parental Obligations.Bernard G. Prusak - 2011 - Social Theory and Practice 37 (2):311-332.
    Contemporary philosophy offers two main accounts of how parental obligations are acquired: the causal and the voluntarist account. Elizabeth Brake's provocative paper "Fatherhood and Child Support: Do Men Have a Right to Choose?" seeks to clear the way for the voluntarist account by focusing on the relevance of abortion rights to parental obligations. The present paper is concerned with rebutting Brake's argument that, if a woman does not acquire parental obligations to an unborn child just by having voluntarily acted in (...)
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  7.  42
    Le Rire À Nouveau: Rereading Bergson.Bernard G. Prusak - 2004 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (4):377-388.
  8.  33
    America and the Political Philosophy of Common Sense.Bernard G. Prusak - 2011 - Review of Metaphysics 65 (2):447-449.
  9.  22
    A Defense of Dignity: Creating Life, Destroying Life, and Protecting the Rights of Conscience, Written by Christopher Kaczor.Bernard G. Prusak - 2017 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 14 (2):237-239.
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  10.  48
    The Problem with the Problem of the Embryo.Bernard G. Prusak - 2008 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (3):503-521.
    This paper seeks to explain why the debate over the personhood of the embryo goes nowhere and is more likely to generate confusion than conviction. The paper presents two arguments. The first aims to establish that the question of the personhood of the embryo cannot be resolved by turning to science, althoughthe debate about the embryo has largely been a debate about the scientific facts. It is claimed that the rough facts on which the parties to the debate agree admit (...)
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  11.  34
    The Debate Over Liberal Eugenics.Nicholas Agar, Dan W. Brock, Paul Lauritzen & Bernard G. Prusak - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
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  12.  27
    Aquinas, Double-Effect Reasoning, and the Pauline Principle.Bernard G. Prusak - 2015 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 89 (3):505-520.
    This paper reconsiders whether Aquinas is rightly read as a double-effect thinker and whether it is right to understand him as concurring with Paul’s dictum that evil is not to be done that good may come. I focus on what to make of Aquinas’s position that, though the private citizen may not intend to kill a man in self-defense, those holding public authority, like soldiers, may rightly do so. On my interpretation, we cannot attribute to Aquinas the position that aiming (...)
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  13.  38
    What Are the “Right Reasons” to Forgive?Bernard G. Prusak - 2008 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 82:287-295.
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  14.  42
    What Are Parents For?: Reproductive Ethics After the Nonidentity Problem.Bernard G. Prusak - 2010 - Hastings Center Report 40 (2):37-47.
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  15.  24
    Justice for Children: Autonomy Development and the State.Bernard G. Prusak - 2009 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 18 (1/2):124-127.
  16.  33
    What Kant Reconstructed Brings to Aquinas Reconstructed; Or, Why and How the New Natural Law Needs to Be Extended.Bernard G. Prusak - 2008 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 82:99-113.
    The thesis of this paper is that the new natural law has reason to try to integrate Kant’s ethics, not reject it. My argument breaks into two parts. First I provide a critical account of the new natural law, taking as my exemplar of this theory Germain Grisez, Joseph Boyle, and John Finnis’s 1987 article “Practical Principles, Moral Truth, and Ultimate Ends.” My criticism in the end is that the new natural law is vulnerable to much the same criticism that (...)
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  17.  19
    The Ancients, the Moderns, and the Court.Bernard G. Prusak - 2005 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 79:189-200.
    This paper examines the case of Lawrence v. Texas to bring out the philosophical commitments of Justices Anthony Kennedy and Antonin Scalia. It is proposed that Justices Kennedy and Scalia, while both Catholics, represent fundamentally different visions of the “ends and reasons” of democratic law. A close reading of the Justices’ opinions in Lawrence indicates that Justice Scalia belongs to the tradition of the “ancients” and Justice Kennedy to the tradition of the “moderns.” The paper focuses in particular on the (...)
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  18.  18
    Back to the Future: Habermas's" The Future of Human Nature".Bernard G. Prusak & Erik Malmqvist - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
  19.  13
    Forgiveness.Bernard G. Prusak - 2008 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 82:99-113.
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  20.  21
    On the Meaning of Life.Bernard G. Prusak - 2004 - International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (1):110-111.
  21.  20
    After Rawls?Bernard G. Prusak - 2008 - Social Philosophy Today 24:187-194.
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  22.  8
    Frederick J. Crosson, Ten Philosophical Essays in the Christian Tradition.Bernard G. Prusak - 2016 - Augustinian Studies 47 (2):247-249.
  23.  16
    Whither the “Offices of Nature”?: Kant and the Obligation to Love.Bernard G. Prusak - 2009 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 83:113-128.
    Since Kant, the standard response to the commandment to love has been that our affections are not ours to command, and so an obligation to feel lovefor another cannot reasonably be demanded. On this account, we must say that a parent who fails to love his or her child, in the sense of feeling affection for himor her, has not violated any obligation toward that child. Maybe we could say still that the parent is deficient somehow, but we could not (...)
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  24.  14
    Children in Late Ancient Christianity.Bernard G. Prusak - 2011 - Augustinian Studies 42 (1):121-122.
  25.  9
    Review of Cynthia Willett, Irony in the Age of Empire: Comic Perspectives on Democracy and Freedom[REVIEW]Bernard G. Prusak - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (3).
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  26.  35
    Faith and Reason in Theory and Practice: Some Reflections on the Responsibility of the Philosopher in Teaching Ethics at a Catholic University.Bernard G. Prusak - 2006 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 80 (1):23-40.
    This paper takes up the question, “What is the responsibility of the philosopher, specifically the Catholic philosopher, in teaching ethics at a Catholic university?” Examination of the constitution Ex Corde Ecclesiae reveals that answering this question requires examining in turn the relationship between theology and philosophy. Accordingly, the paper proceeds to an analysis of the late Pope John Paul II’s encyclical, Fides et Ratio. Th is analysis shows, however, that the very distinction between theology and philosophy seems to become problematic (...)
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  27.  29
    What Was to Be Demonstrated: A Reply to Christopher Tollefsen’s “No Problem”.Bernard G. Prusak - 2009 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 83 (4):593-597.
    In his reply to my paper “The Problem with the Problem of the Embryo,” which appeared in the Summer 2008 issue of ACPQ, Christopher Tollefsen claims that I muddle matters by failing to keep distinct questions of biology from questions having to do with personhood; I have the science wrong in my account of the debate over the fact that the embryo depends on “maternal donation” for its development; and my so-called “counsel of pragmatism” is unlikely to lead to any (...)
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