Results for 'Hamilton's rule'

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  1. Hamilton's Rule and Its Discontents.Jonathan Birch - 2014 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 65 (2):381-411.
    In an incendiary 2010 Nature article, M. A. Nowak, C. E. Tarnita, and E. O. Wilson present a savage critique of the best-known and most widely used framework for the study of social evolution, W. D. Hamilton’s theory of kin selection. More than a hundred biologists have since rallied to the theory’s defence, but Nowak et al. maintain that their arguments ‘stand unrefuted’. Here I consider the most contentious claim Nowak et al. defend: that Hamilton’s rule, the core explanatory (...)
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  2.  24
    Maclean's Evolutionary Neuroscience, the Csn Model and Hamilton's Rule: Some Developmental, Clinical, and Social Policy Implications. [REVIEW]Gerald A. Cory - 2002 - Brain and Mind 3 (1):151-181.
    Paul MacLean, founder and long-time chief ofthe Laboratory of Brain Evolution and Behavior,National Institutes of Health, is a pioneeringfigure in the emergent field of evolutionaryneuroscience. His influence has been widelyfelt in the development of biologicalpsychiatry and has led to a considerableliterature on evolutionary approaches toclinical issues. MacLean's work is alsoenjoying a resurgence of interest in academicareas of neuroscience and evolutionarypsychology which have previously shown littleinterest or knowledge of his extensive work. This chapter builds on MacLean's work to bringtogether new insights (...)
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  3. On Hamilton's Rule and Inclusive Fitness Theory with Nonadditive Payoffs.Samir Oksaha - 2016 - Philosophy of Science 83 (5):873-883.
    Hamilton’s theory of inclusive fitness is a widely used framework for studying the evolution of social behavior, but controversy surrounds its status. Hamilton originally derived his famous rb > c rule for the spread of a social gene by assuming additivity of costs and benefits. However, it has recently been argued that the additivity assumption can be dispensed with, so long as the −c and b terms are suitably defined, as partial regression coefficients. I argue that this way of (...)
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  4.  95
    Kin Selection and Its Critics.Jonathan Birch & Samir Okasha - 2015 - BioScience 65 (1):22-32.
    Hamilton’s theory of kin selection is the best-known framework for understanding the evolution of social behavior but has long been a source of controversy in evolutionary biology. A recent critique of the theory by Nowak, Tarnita, and Wilson sparked a new round of debate, which shows no signs of abating. In this overview, we highlight a number of conceptual issues that lie at the heart of the current debate. We begin by emphasizing that there are various alternative formulations of Hamilton’s (...)
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  5.  12
    The Inclusive Fitness Controversy: Finding a Way Forward.Jonathan Birch - 2017 - Royal Society Open Science 4:170335.
    This paper attempts to reconcile critics and defenders of inclusive fitness by constructing a synthesis that does justice to the insights of both. I argue that criticisms of the regression-based version of Hamilton’s rule, although they undermine its use for predictive purposes, do not undermine its use as an organizing framework for social evolution research. I argue that the assumptions underlying the concept of inclusive fitness, conceived as a causal property of an individual organism, are unlikely to be exactly (...)
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  6.  14
    Inclusive Fitness and the Sociobiology of the Genome.Herbert Gintis - 2014 - Biology and Philosophy 29 (4):477-515.
    Inclusive fitness theory provides conditions for the evolutionary success of a gene. These conditions ensure that the gene is selfish in the sense of Dawkins (The selfish gene, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1976): genes do not and cannot sacrifice their own fitness on behalf of the reproductive population. Therefore, while natural selection explains the appearance of design in the living world (Dawkins in The blind watchmaker: why the evidence of evolution reveals a universe without design, W. W. Norton, New York, (...)
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  7.  64
    Queller's Separation Condition Explained and Defended.Jonathan Birch & James A. R. Marshall - 2014 - American Naturalist 184 (4):531-540.
    The theories of inclusive fitness and multilevel selection provide alternative perspectives on social evolution. The question of whether these perspectives are of equal generality remains a divisive issue. In an analysis based on the Price equation, Queller argued (by means of a principle he called the separation condition) that the two approaches are subject to the same limitations, arising from their fundamentally quantitative-genetical character. Recently, van Veelen et al. have challenged Queller’s results, using this as the basis for a broader (...)
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  8.  3
    Hamilton’s Principle and Dispositional Essentialism: Friends or Foes?Vassilis Livanios - forthcoming - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie:1-13.
    Most recently Smart and Thébault revived an almost forgotten debate between Katzav and Ellis on the compatibility of Hamilton’s Principle with Dispositional Essentialism. Katzav’s arguments inter alia aim to show that HP presupposes a kind of metaphysical contingency which is at odds with the basic tenets of DE, and offers explanations of a different type and direction from those given by DE. In this paper I argue that though dispositional essentialists might adequately respond to these arguments, the question about the (...)
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  9.  29
    Measures of Assortativity.Theodore C. Bergstrom - 2013 - Biological Theory 8 (2):133-141.
    This paper discusses alternative measures of assortative matching and relates them to Sewall Wright’s F-statistic. It also explores applications of measures of assortativity to evolutionary dynamics. We generalize Wright’s statistic to allow the possibility that some types match more assortatively than others, and explore the possibility of identifying parameters of this more general model from the observed distribution of matches by the partners’ types.
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  10.  21
    Sleeping Beauty in a Grain of Rice.David Haig - 2016 - Biology and Philosophy 31 (1):23-37.
    In the Sleeping Beauty problem, Beauty is woken once if a coin lands heads or twice if the coin lands tails but promptly forgets each waking on returning to sleep. Philosophers have divided over whether her waking credence in heads should be a half or a third. Beauty has centered beliefs about her world and about her location in that world. When given new information about her location she should update her worldly beliefs before updating her locative beliefs. When she (...)
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  11.  10
    Evolution and the Classification of Social Behavior.Patrick Forber & Rory Smead - 2015 - Biology and Philosophy 30 (3):405-421.
    Recent studies in the evolution of cooperation have shifted focus from altruistic to mutualistic cooperation. This change in focus is purported to reveal new explanations for the evolution of prosocial behavior. We argue that the common classification scheme for social behavior used to distinguish between altruistic and mutualistic cooperation is flawed because it fails to take into account dynamically relevant game-theoretic features. This leads some arguments about the evolution of cooperation to conflate dynamical scenarios that differ regarding the basic conditions (...)
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  12.  3
    The Role of Formal Logic in Hamilton's Argument for the Philosophy of the Conditioned.James W. Allard - 2017 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 15 (2):197-211.
    This paper reconstructs Sir William Hamilton's argument for thinking that the unconditioned is not an object of thought, a conclusion he abbreviates with the slogan ‘to think is to condition’. The paper describes Hamilton's conception of formal logic as the study of the laws of thought and claims that this conception allows these laws, particularly those of non-contradiction and excluded middle, to play a substantive role in Hamilton's argument.
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  13.  34
    Hamilton's Law or Hamilton's Principle: A Response to Ulvi Yurtsever. [REVIEW]Cecil D. Bailey - 1983 - Foundations of Physics 13 (5):539-544.
    The law of varying action and Hamilton's principle of classical mechanics are discussed. It is now clear that the law of varying action, introduced by Hamilton in his papers of 1834 and 1935, was never recognized by either the mathematicians or other scientists who followed him. Why this occurred is discussed in this paper.
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  14.  31
    A New Look at Hamilton's Principle.Cecil D. Bailey - 1975 - Foundations of Physics 5 (3):433-451.
    Hamilton's principle and Hamilton's law are discussed. Hamilton's law is then applied to achieve direct solutions to time-dependent, nonconservative, initial value problems without the use of the theory of differential or integral equations. A major question has always plagued competent investigators who use “energy methods,” viz., “Why is it that one can derive the differential equations for a system from Hamilton's principle and then solve these equations (at least in principle) subject to applicable initial and boundary (...)
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  15.  20
    Comments on “A More Precise Statement of Hamilton's Principle”.Ulvi Yurtsever - 1983 - Foundations of Physics 13 (5):529-537.
    Among the problems C. D. Bailey has questioned in a recent paper (Ref. 1) are a precise and general formulation of Hamilton's variational principle and the establishment of a sufficiency criterion for this to be a minimum principle. In this paper, we will try to answer these questions using the geometric theory of classical mechanics.
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  16.  14
    On a More Precise Statement of Hamilton's Principle.Cecil D. Bailey - 1981 - Foundations of Physics 11 (3-4):279-296.
    It has been recognized in the literature of the calculus of variations that the classical statement of the principle of least action (Hamilton's principle for conservative systems) is not strictly correct. Recently, mathematical proofs have been offered for what is claimed to be a more precise statement of Hamilton's principle for conservative systems. According to a widely publicized version of this more precise statement, the action integral for conservative systems is a minimum for discrete systems for small time (...)
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  17.  18
    Hamilton's Quantification of the Predicate.W. Bednarowski - 1955 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 56:217 - 240.
    This paper consists roughly of three parts. In the first part, an attempt has been made to find some tenable interpretation of Hamilton's logic. This results in accepting that Hamilton's logic can be "saved" if it is understood as being an everday language version of Euler's relations, i.e., extensional relations between terms (classes). In the second part, the propositions of Euler and the propositions of Aristotle are compared and found to be interdefinable: every proposition of Aristotle can be (...)
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  18.  1
    XI.—Hamilton's Quantification of the Predicate.W. Bednarowski - 1956 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 56 (1):217-240.
    This paper consists roughly of three parts. In the first part, an attempt has been made to find some tenable interpretation of Hamilton's logic. This results in accepting that Hamilton's logic can be "saved" if it is understood as being an everday language version of Euler's relations, i.e., extensional relations between terms. In the second part, the propositions of Euler and the propositions of Aristotle are compared and found to be interdefinable: every proposition of Aristotle can be defined (...)
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  19.  1
    25. Sir William Hamilton’s Theory of Pleasure and Pain.John Stuart Mill - 1979 - In John StuartHG Mill (ed.), An Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy: Volume 9. University of Toronto Press. pp. 430-436.
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  20. 20. On Sir William Hamilton's Conception of Logic as a Science. Is Logic the Science of the Laws, or Forms, of Thought?John StuartHG Mill - 1979 - In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy: Volume 9. University of Toronto Press. pp. 348-371.
  21. 22. Of Sir William Hamilton's Supposed Improvements in Formal Logic.John StuartHG Mill - 1979 - In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy: Volume 9. University of Toronto Press. pp. 385-403.
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  22. 23. Of Some Minor Peculiarities of Doctrine in Sir William Hamilton’s View of Formal Logic.John StuartHG Mill - 1979 - In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy: Volume 9. University of Toronto Press. pp. 404-416.
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  23. 10. Sir William Hamilton’s View of the Different Theories Respecting the Belief in an External World.John StuartHG Mill - 1979 - In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy: Volume 9. University of Toronto Press. pp. 149-176.
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  24. 15. Sir William Hamilton’s Doctrine of Unconscious Mental Modifications.John StuartHG Mill - 1979 - In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy: Volume 9. University of Toronto Press. pp. 272-285.
  25. 16. Sir William Hamilton's Theory of Causation.John StuartHG Mill - 1979 - In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy: Volume 9. University of Toronto Press. pp. 286-300.
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  26. 27. Sir William Hamilton’s Opinions on the Study of Mathematics.John StuartHG Mill - 1979 - In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy: Volume 9. University of Toronto Press. pp. 470-489.
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  27. Hamilton's Two Conceptions of Social Fitness.Jonathan Birch - 2016 - Philosophy of Science 83 (5):848-860.
    Hamilton introduced two conceptions of social fitness, which he called neighbour-modulated fitness and inclusive fitness. Although he regarded them as formally equivalent, a re-analysis of his own argument for their equivalence brings out two important assumptions on which it rests: weak additivity and actor's control. When weak additivity breaks down, neither fitness concept is appropriate in its original form. When actor's control breaks down, neighbour-modulated fitness may be appropriate, but inclusive fitness is not. Yet I argue that, despite its more (...)
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  28. An Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy and of the Principal Philosophical Questions Discussed in His Writings.John Stuart Mill - 1866 - University of Toronto Press.
  29. An Examination of Sir William Hamilton’s Philosophy, and of the Principal Philosophical Questions Discussed in His Writings.John Stuart Mill - 1865 - Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts & Green.
     
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  30.  4
    Influences on Boole's Logic: The Controversy Between William Hamilton and Augustus De Morgan.Luis M. Laita - 1979 - Annals of Science 36 (1):45-65.
    This paper studies the possible influences on Boole's logic of the writings related to the controversy over the quantification of the predicate between the philosopher William Hamilton and the mathematician Augustus De Morgan. As Boole himself testified in the introduction to his book The mathematical analysis of logic , this controversy was the external agent that stimulated him into writing up his earlier thoughts about a new conception of logic. But in addition to the external role that was played by (...)
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  31.  5
    Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, Great Britain 20: The British Museum 10: Fragments From Sir William Hamilton's Second Collection of Vases Recovered From the Wreck of HMS Colossus. [REVIEW]Ian McPhee, V. Smallwood & S. Woodford - 2004 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 124:212.
  32.  2
    Gavin Hamilton's Letters to Charles Townley.G. J. Hamilton & A. H. Smith - 1901 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 21:306.
  33. Review of the Work of Mr John Stuart Mill, Entitled, 'Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy'. [REVIEW]George Grote, John Stuart Mill & William Hamilton - 1868 - Trübner.
     
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  34. Hamilton Versus Mill a Thorough Discussion of Each Chapter in Mr. John S. Mill`s Examination of Hamilton`s Logic and Philosophy Beginning with the Logic''.William Hamilton & John Stuart Mill - 1866 - Maclachan & Stewart.
     
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  35. An Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosopy: Ix. An Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy.John Stuart Mill - 2009 - Routledge.
    The Collected Works of John Stuart Mill took thirty years to complete and is acknowledged as the definitive edition of J.S. Mill and as one of the finest works editions ever completed. Mill's contributions to philosophy, economics, and history, and in the roles of scholar, politician and journalist can hardly be overstated and this edition remains the only reliable version of the full range of Mill's writings. Each volume contains extensive notes, a new introduction and an index. Many of the (...)
     
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  36.  11
    Book Review: "Scruton's Aesthetics", by Andy Hamilton and Nick Zangwill (Palgrave & Macmillan, 2012). [REVIEW]Andrew Huddleston - unknown
    Few philosophers have published at the impressively prolific rate that Roger Scruton has. Of the forty-two books by Scruton listed in a special bibliography at the end of Scruton’s Aesthetics, no fewer than nine of them have been devoted to topics in aesthetics. The present volume, edited by Andy Hamilton and Nick Zangwill, arises out of a 2008 conference devoted to Scruton’s seminal work in this field. While sympathetic in tone, the majority of the essays critically engage with Scruton’s views (...)
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  37.  3
    Resisting the Enlightenment's Instrumentalist Legacy: James, Hamilton, and Carlyle on the Mechanisation of the Human Condition.Ralph Jessop - 2013 - History of European Ideas 39 (5):631-649.
    Summary In the early post-Enlightenment period, informed by the history of Scottish and European thought, Thomas Carlyle (1795?1881) and Sir William Hamilton (1788?1856) alerted readers to a melancholy future emerging from mechanical theories of the mind. Opposing a Lockean strand in British and French philosophy, their concerns involved predictions about, among other things, a descent into pessimism and nihilism, and the end of metaphysics and moral philosophy. Arguably influenced by Carlyle and Hamilton, William James's (1842?1910) much later Varieties of Religious (...)
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  38.  35
    Mathematical Models of Biological Patterns: Lessons From Hamilton's Selfish Herd.Christopher Pincock - 2012 - Biology and Philosophy 27 (4):481-496.
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  39.  2
    An Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy.John Skorupski, John Stuart Mill, Alan Ryan & J. M. Robson - 1982 - Philosophical Quarterly 32 (127):171.
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  40. Hamilton's Theory of Quantifying the Predicate--A Correction.Robert J. Fogelin - 1976 - Philosophical Quarterly 26 (105):352-353.
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  41.  23
    Rehearsal and Hamilton's “Ingredients Model” of Theatrical Performance.David Davies - 2009 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 43 (3):pp. 23-36.
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  42.  3
    William D. Hamilton’s Brazilian Lectures and His Unpublished Model Regarding Wynne-Edwards’s Idea of Natural Selection. With a Note on ‘Pluralism’ and Different Philosophical Approaches to Evolution.Emanuele Coco - 2016 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 38 (4).
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    The Evolution of William Rowan Hamilton's View of Algebra as the Science of Pure Time.John Hendry - 1984 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 15 (1):63-81.
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  44.  37
    Gavin Hamilton's Oath of Brutus and David's Oath of the Horatii.David Carrier - 1988 - The Monist 71 (2):197-213.
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  45.  33
    Hamilton's Hodograph.J. M. Child - 1915 - The Monist 25 (4):615-624.
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    The Utopianism of Hamilton's State of Needs: On Rights, Deliberation, and the Nature of Politics.Melissa Lane - 2006 - South African Journal of Philosophy 25 (3):242-248.
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  47.  10
    Hamilton's Quantification of the Predicate.Robert J. Fogelin - 1976 - Philosophical Quarterly 26 (104):217-228.
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  48.  7
    Hamilton's New Look: A Reply.Brian Garrett - 1996 - Philosophical Quarterly 46 (183):220-225.
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    Explanation in the Historiography of Mathematics: The Case of Hamilton's Quaternions.T. Koetsier - 1995 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 26 (4):593-616.
  50. The Evolution of William Rowan Hamilton's Views of Algebra as the Science of Pure Time.John Hendry - 1984 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 15 (1):63.
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