Results for 'M. Bouchard'

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  1.  21
    Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Medieval Academy of America, 2006.Richard K. Emmerson, Barbara A. Shailor, Susan Mosher Stuard, William Mahrt, Edward Peters, Madeline H. Caviness, Susan Boynton, Lawrence M. Clopper, Constance Brittain Bouchard, Thomas E. A. Dale, Carol Symes, Bruce W. Holsinger, David N. Klausner, Robert E. Bjork, William Chester Jordan & Vickie Ziegler - 2006 - Speculum 81 (3):958-971.
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  2.  38
    William M. Aird, Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy, C. 1050–1134. Woodbridge, Eng., and Rochester, N.Y.: Boydell and Brewer, 2008. Pp. Xx, 328; 1 Genealogical Table and Maps. $115.Constance B. Bouchard - 2009 - Speculum 84 (4):1009-1010.
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  3. Deux textes introductifs de Thomas Hobbes à sa traduction anglaise de Thucydide.M. Bouchard - 1992 - Revue de Théologie Et de Philosophie 124 (1):5-18.
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  4. Sur la philosophie première et la philosophie politique de Hobbes.M. Bouchard - 1988 - Freiburger Zeitschrift für Philosophie Und Theologie 35 (3):527-534.
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  5.  24
    The Curious Case of Robert Southwell, Gerard Hopkins and a Princely Spanish Hawk.Gary M. Bouchard - 1999 - Renascence 51 (3):181-189.
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  6.  17
    The Roman Steps to the Temple: An Examination of the Influence of Robert Southwell, SJ, Upon George Herbert.Gary M. Bouchard - 2007 - Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España] 10 (3).
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  7.  5
    Providing Psychological and Emotional Support After Perinatal Loss: Protocol for a Virtual Reality-Based Intervention.Giulia Corno, Stéphane Bouchard, Rosa M. Baños, Marie-Christine Rivard, Chantal Verdon & Francine de Montigny - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  8. Markovits, H., B93.A. Monk, A. Berthoz, B. Bouchard, H. Clahsen, K. Emmorey, L. Gagnon, E. Gibson, M. Giles, G. Hickok & E. Klima - 1998 - Cognition 68:251.
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  9.  13
    "Every Valley Shall Be Exalted": The Discourse of Opposites in Twelfth-Century Thought. Constance Brittain Bouchard.Jan M. Ziolkowski - 2005 - Speculum 80 (3):841-843.
  10.  48
    Growth, Maturation and Physical Activity. Edited by Robert M. Malina & Claude Bouchard. Pp. 501. £34.00 - Worldwide Variation in Human Growth . Edited by Phyllis B. Eveleth & James M. Tanner. Pp. 397. [REVIEW]D. F. Roberts - 1993 - Journal of Biosocial Science 25 (2):281-283.
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  11.  26
    Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Medieval Academy of America, 2005.Richard K. Emmerson, Barbara A. Shailor, Susan Mosher Stuard, Madeline H. Caviness, Edward Peters, Thomas J. Heffernan, Constance Brittain Bouchard, Lawrence M. Clopper, Jeffrey F. Hamburger, Bruce W. Holsinger, Carol Symes, Paul Edward Dutton, David N. Klausner, Nancy van Deusen, William Chester Jordan & Vickie Ziegler - 2005 - Speculum 80 (3):1022-1034.
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  12. Symposium: Overpopulation and Contraception. Introduction.T. J. Madigan, J. Narveson, R. Seewald, M. Claeson, R. C. Hogan, A. Torres, R. J. Waldman, L. A. Hurst, G. Bouchard & V. Smil - 1994 - Free Inquiry 14 (2):6.
     
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  13.  15
    Lachelier’s Idealism.John King-Farlow - 1982 - Idealistic Studies 12 (1):72-78.
    M. Roch Bouchard has contributed an intriguing essay to Idealistic Studies: “Idealist Requirements and the Affirmation of the Other World—the Lachelier Case”. His subject, the distinguished French idealist, Jules Lachelier, is shown by M. Bouchard to have idealized in triumphantly paradoxical form certain tensions between Divine Immanence and Transcendence that have troubled Biblical religionists for millennia. Problems raised for the educated faithful by thinkers like Parmenides, Plotinus, Eriugena, Boehme, Spinoza, Goethe, and Hegel came home all at once to (...)
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  14.  2
    Lachelier’s Idealism.John King-Farlow - 1982 - Idealistic Studies 12:72.
    M. Roch Bouchard has contributed an intriguing essay to Idealistic Studies: “Idealist Requirements and the Affirmation of the Other World—the Lachelier Case”. His subject, the distinguished French idealist, Jules Lachelier, is shown by M. Bouchard to have idealized in triumphantly paradoxical form certain tensions between Divine Immanence and Transcendence that have troubled Biblical religionists for millennia. Problems raised for the educated faithful by thinkers like Parmenides, Plotinus, Eriugena, Boehme, Spinoza, Goethe, and Hegel came home all at once to (...)
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  15.  2
    Lachelier’s Idealism—Paradox Redoubled.John King-Farlow - 1982 - Idealistic Studies 12 (1):72-78.
    M. Roch Bouchard has contributed an intriguing essay to Idealistic Studies: “Idealist Requirements and the Affirmation of the Other World—the Lachelier Case”. His subject, the distinguished French idealist, Jules Lachelier, is shown by M. Bouchard to have idealized in triumphantly paradoxical form certain tensions between Divine Immanence and Transcendence that have troubled Biblical religionists for millennia. Problems raised for the educated faithful by thinkers like Parmenides, Plotinus, Eriugena, Boehme, Spinoza, Goethe, and Hegel came home all at once to (...)
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  16. Functions: Selection and Mechanisms.Philippe Huneman (ed.) - 2013 - Springer.
    This volume handles in various perspectives the concept of function and the nature of functional explanations, topics much discussed since two major and conflicting accounts have been raised by Larry Wright and Robert Cummins’s papers in the 1970s. Here, both Wright’s ”etiological theory of functions’ and Cummins’s ”systemic’ conception of functions are refined and elaborated in the light of current scientific practice, with papers showing how the ”etiological’ theory faces several objections and may in reply be revisited, while its counterpart (...)
     
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  17. From Groups to Individuals: Evolution and Emerging Individuality.Frédéric Bouchard & Philippe Huneman (eds.) - 2013 - MIT Press.
    Our intuitive assumption that only organisms are the real individuals in the natural world is at odds with developments in cell biology, ecology, genetics, evolutionary biology, and other fields. Although organisms have served for centuries as nature’s paradigmatic individuals, science suggests that organisms are only one of the many ways in which the natural world could be organized. When living beings work together—as in ant colonies, beehives, and bacteria-metazoan symbiosis—new collective individuals can emerge. In this book, leading scholars consider the (...)
     
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  18. Causal Processes, Fitness, and the Differential Persistence of Lineages.Frédéric Bouchard - 2008 - Philosophy of Science 75 (5):560-570.
    Ecological fitness has been suggested to provide a unifying definition of fitness. However, a metric for this notion of fitness was in most cases unavailable except by proxy with differential reproductive success. In this article, I show how differential persistence of lineages can be used as a way to assess ecological fitness. This view is inspired by a better understanding of the evolution of some clonal plants, colonial organisms, and ecosystems. Differential persistence shows the limitation of an ensemblist noncausal understanding (...)
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  19. Fitness, Probability and the Principles of Natural Selection.Frederic Bouchard & Alexander Rosenberg - 2004 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (4):693-712.
    We argue that a fashionable interpretation of the theory of natural selection as a claim exclusively about populations is mistaken. The interpretation rests on adopting an analysis of fitness as a probabilistic propensity which cannot be substantiated, draws parallels with thermodynamics which are without foundations, and fails to do justice to the fundamental distinction between drift and selection. This distinction requires a notion of fitness as a pairwise comparison between individuals taken two at a time, and so vitiates the interpretation (...)
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  20. Can the Aim of Belief Ground Epistemic Normativity?Charles Côté-Bouchard - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (12):3181-3198.
    For many epistemologists and normativity theorists, epistemic norms necessarily entail normative reasons. Why or in virtue of what do epistemic norms have this necessary normative authority? According to what I call epistemic constitutivism, it is ultimately because belief constitutively aims at truth. In this paper, I examine various versions of the aim of belief thesis and argue that none of them can plausibly ground the normative authority of epistemic norms. I conclude that epistemic constitutivism is not a promising strategy for (...)
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  21. Epistemic Instrumentalism and the Too Few Reasons Objection.Charles Côté-Bouchard - 2015 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 23 (3):337-355.
    According to epistemic instrumentalism, epistemic normativity arises from and depends on facts about our ends. On that view, a consideration C is an epistemic reason for a subject S to Φ only if Φ-ing would promote an end that S has. However, according to the Too Few Epistemic Reasons objection, this cannot be correct since there are cases in which, intuitively, C is an epistemic reason for S to Φ even though Φ-ing would not promote any of S’s ends. After (...)
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  22. Darwinism Without Populations: A More Inclusive Understanding of the “Survival of the Fittest”.Frédéric Bouchard - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 42 (1):106-114.
    Following Wallace’s suggestion, Darwin framed his theory using Spencer’s expression “survival of the fittest”. Since then, fitness occupies a significant place in the conventional understanding of Darwinism, even though the explicit meaning of the term ‘fitness’ is rarely stated. In this paper I examine some of the different roles that fitness has played in the development of the theory. Whereas the meaning of fitness was originally understood in ecological terms, it took a statistical turn in terms of reproductive success throughout (...)
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  23.  43
    What Is a Symbiotic Superindividual and How Do You Measure Its Fitness?Frédéric Bouchard - 2013 - In Philippe Huneman & Frédéric Bouchard (eds.), From Groups to Individuals. Evolution and Emerging Individuality. MIT Press. pp. 243.
  24. Is Epistemic Normativity Value-Based?Charles Côté-Bouchard - 2017 - Dialogue 56 (3):407-430.
    What is the source of epistemic normativity? In virtue of what do epistemic norms have categorical normative authority? According to epistemic teleologism, epistemic normativity comes from value. Epistemic norms have categorical authority because conforming to them is necessarily good in some relevant sense. In this article, I argue that epistemic teleologism should be rejected. The problem, I argue, is that there is no relevant sense in which it is always good to believe in accordance with epistemic norms, including in cases (...)
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  25.  3
    Social Myths and Collective Imaginaries. Some Afterthoughts.Gérard Bouchard - forthcoming - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
  26.  87
    Symbiosis, Lateral Function Transfer and the (Many) Saplings of Life.Frédéric Bouchard - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 25 (4):623-641.
    One of intuitions driving the acceptance of a neat structured tree of life is the assumption that organisms and the lineages they form have somewhat stable spatial and temporal boundaries. The phenomenon of symbiosis shows us that such ‘fixist’ assumptions does not correspond to how the natural world actually works. The implications of lateral gene transfer (LGT) have been discussed elsewhere; I wish to stress a related point. I will focus on lateral function transfer (LFT) and will argue, using examples (...)
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  27.  21
    Darwinism Without Populations: A More Inclusive Understanding of the “Survival of the Fittest”.Frédéric Bouchard - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 42 (1):106-114.
  28.  80
    Ecosystem Evolution is About Variation and Persistence, Not Populations and Reproduction.Frédéric Bouchard - 2014 - Biological Theory 9 (4):382-391.
    Building upon a non-standard understanding of evolutionary process focusing on variation and persistence, I will argue that communities and ecosystems can evolve by natural selection as emergent individuals. Evolutionary biology has relied ever increasingly on the modeling of population dynamics. Most have taken for granted that we all agree on what is a population. Recent work has reexamined this perceived consensus. I will argue that there are good reasons to restrict the term “population” to collections of monophyletically related replicators and (...)
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  29.  75
    Understanding Colonial Traits Using Symbiosis Research and Ecosystem Ecology.Frédéric Bouchard - 2009 - Biological Theory 4 (3):240-246.
    E. O. Wilson (1974: 54) describes the problem that social organisms pose: “On what bases do we distinguish the extremely modified members of an invertebrate colony from the organs of a metazoan animal?” This framing of the issue has inspired many to look more closely at how groups of organisms form and behave as emergent individuals. The possible existence of “superorganisms” test our best intuitions about what can count and act as genuine biological individuals and how we should study them. (...)
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  30.  38
    How Ecosystem Evolution Strengthens the Case for Functional Pluralism.Frédéric Bouchard - 2013 - In Philippe Huneman (ed.), Functions: Selection and Mechanisms. Springer. pp. 83--95.
  31.  2
    Social Myths and Collective Imaginaries. New Directions.Gérard Bouchard - forthcoming - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
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  32.  85
    Belief's Own Metaethics? A Case Against Epistemic Normativity.Charles Cote-Bouchard - 2017 - Dissertation, King's College London
    Epistemology is widely seen as a normative discipline like ethics. Just like moral facts, epistemic facts – i.e. facts about our beliefs’ epistemic justification, rationality, reasonableness, correctness, warrant, and the like – are standardly viewed as normative facts. Yet, whereas many philosophers have rejected the existence of moral facts, few have raised similar doubts about the existence of epistemic facts. In recent years however, several metaethicists and epistemologists have rejected this Janus-faced or dual stance towards the existence of moral and (...)
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  33.  4
    Richard Bodéüs’s The Political Dimensions of Aristotle’s Ethics: 25 Years in Hindsight / Le Philosophe Et la Cité de Richard Bodéüs : Rétrospective.Thornton C. Lockwood - 2020 - Dialogue 59 (1):1-4.
    Il y a vingt-cinq ans, j’étais un étudiant de doctorat intéressé par la philosophie d’Aristote et à la recherche d’un sujet de thèse. Au cours de mes études supérieures, j’ai eu la chance d’étudier l’Éthique à Nicomaque avec Rémi Brague et Les Politiques avec Judith Swanson. Ces deux érudits m’ont, à leur façon, fait prendre conscience de l’importance d’enquêter sur le public cible des œuvres d’Aristote. Tous deux parlaient en bien du livre Le philosophe et la cité (Les Belles Lettres, (...)
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  34.  66
    Knowledge, Reasons, and Errors About Error Theory.Charles Cote-Bouchard & Clayton Littlejohn - 2018 - In Robin McKenna & Christos Kyriacou (eds.), Metaepistemology: Realism & Antirealism. Palgrave Macmillan.
    According to moral error theorists, moral claims necessarily represent categorically or robustly normative facts. But since there are no such facts, moral thought and discourse are systematically mistaken. One widely discussed objection to the moral error theory is that it cannot be true because it leads to an epistemic error theory. We argue that this objection is mistaken. Objectors may be right that the epistemic error theory is untenable. We also agree with epistemic realists that our epistemological claims are not (...)
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  35.  68
    The Roles of Institutional Trust and Distrust in Grounding Rational Deference to Scientific Expertise.Frédéric Bouchard - 2016 - Perspectives on Science 24 (5):582-608.
    Given the complexity of most phenomena, we have to delegate much epistemic work to other knowers and we must find reasons for relying on these specific knowers and not others. In our societies, these other knowers are often called experts and we rely on their epistemic authority more and more. For many complex phenomena such as climate change, genetically modified crops, and immunization, the experts that are called upon are scientific experts. For that reason, finding good reasons and justification for (...)
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  36.  4
    Videoconferencing Psychotherapy for Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia: Outcome and Treatment Processes From a Non-Randomized Non-Inferiority Trial.Stéphane Bouchard, Micheline Allard, Geneviève Robillard, Stéphanie Dumoulin, Tanya Guitard, Claudie Loranger, Isabelle Green-Demers, André Marchand, Patrice Renaud, Louis-Georges Cournoyer & Giulia Corno - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  37.  5
    Reclaiming Relationality Through the Logic of the Gift and Vulnerability.Laurie Gagnon-Bouchard & Camille Ranger - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (1):41-57.
    This article addresses the conditions that are necessary for non-Indigenous people to learn from Indigenous people, more specifically from women and feminists. As non-Indigenous scholars, we first explore the challenges of epistemic dialogue through the example of Traditional Ecological Knowledge. From there, through the concept of mastery, we examine the social and ontological conditions under which settler subjectivities develop. As demonstrated by Julietta Singh and Val Plumwood, the logic of mastery—which has legitimated the oppression and exploitation of Indigenous peoples—has been (...)
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  38.  55
    A Persistence Enhancing Propensity Account of Ecological Function to Explain Ecosystem Evolution.Antoine C. Dussault & Frédéric Bouchard - 2017 - Synthese 194 (4).
    We argue that ecology in general and biodiversity and ecosystem function research in particular need an understanding of functions which is both ahistorical and evolutionarily grounded. A natural candidate in this context is Bigelow and Pargetter’s evolutionary forward-looking account which, like the causal role account, assigns functions to parts of integrated systems regardless of their past history, but supplements this with an evolutionary dimension that relates functions to their bearers’ ability to thrive and perpetuate themselves. While Bigelow and Pargetter’s account (...)
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  39.  21
    Epistemological Closed Questions: A Reply to Greco.Charles Côte-Bouchard - 2017 - Manuscrito 40 (4):97-111.
    ABSTRACT According to G.E. Moore’s ‘Open Question’ argument, moral facts cannot be reduced or analyzed in non-normative natural terms. Does the OQA apply equally in the epistemic domain? Does Moore’s argument have the same force against reductionist accounts of epistemic facts and concepts? In a recent article, Daniel Greco has argued that it does. According to Greco, an epistemological version of the OQA is just as promising as its moral cousin, because the relevant questions in epistemology are just as ‘open’ (...)
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  40.  17
    Ethics Education Seen Through the Lens of Habermas’s Conception of Practical Reason: The Québec Education Program.Nancy Bouchard & Ronald W. Morris - 2012 - Journal of Moral Education 41 (2):171-187.
    This paper examines the Québec Education Program (QEP), particularly the new course in ethics and religious culture (ERC), in the light of Habermas?s conception of the moral and ethical uses of practical reason. Habermas?s discursive theory of morality is used to assess the program?s understanding of what it means to be competent in moral matters. Specifically, the paper considers whether or not the program limits the exercise of practical reason to its purely pragmatic form, and the extent to which the (...)
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  41.  25
    Brain Readiness and the Nature of Language.Denis Bouchard - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  42.  40
    Fitness (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy).A. Rosenberg & F. Bouchard - 2011 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Web 17 (8):457-473.
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  43. Matthen and Ariew’s Obituary for Fitness: Reports of its Death Have Been Greatly Exaggerated. [REVIEW]Alexander Rosenberg & Frederic Bouchard - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):343-353.
    Philosophers of biology have been absorbed by the problem of defining evolutionary fitness since Darwin made it central to biological explanation. The apparent problem is obvious. Define fitness as some biologists implicitly do, in terms of actual survival and reproduction, and the principle of natural selection turns into an empty tautology: those organisms which survive and reproduce in larger numbers, survive and reproduce in larger numbers. Accordingly, many writers have sought to provide a definition for ‘fitness’ which avoid this outcome. (...)
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  44.  63
    The Semantics of Syntax: A Minimalist Approach to Grammar.Denis Bouchard - 1995 - University of Chicago Press.
    During the last thirty years, most linguists and philosophers have assumed that meaning can be represented symbolically and that the mental processing of language involves the manipulation of symbols. Scholars have assembled strong evidence that there must be linguistic representations at several abstract levels--phonological, syntactic, and semantic--and that those representations are related by a describable system of rules. Because meaning is so complex, linguists often posit an equally complex relationship between semantic and other levels of grammar. The Semantics of Syntax (...)
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  45.  4
    Aphrodite Philommêdês in the Theogony.Elsa Bouchard - 2015 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 135:8-18.
  46.  43
    L'antimodèle Platonicien de la Nouvelle Rhétorique.Guy Bouchard - 1981 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 11 (4):693 - 711.
    Dans son effort pour ébranler la dichotomie entre la raison calculatrice et le domaine de l'irrationnel, Ch. Perelman s'inspire de la rhétorique ancienne et, entre autres, de Platon. Il utilise celui-ci pour illustrer le mépris des philosophes à l'égard de la rhétorique, pour indiquer la voie d'une rhétorique différente, et pour caractériser la forme du dialogue. On montre que cette condamnation de la rhétorique est beaucoup plus systématique, chez Platon, que ne le laisse entendre Perelman; que la "rhétorique digne des (...)
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  47.  57
    Rhétorique des mots, rhétorique des idées. À propos du « Traité de l'argumentation » de Ch. Perelman et L. Olbrechts-Tyteca.Guy Bouchard - 1979 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 35 (3):301-313.
    L'histoire de la rhétorique s'apparente à une peau de chagrin: d'une préoccupation pour les mots et les idées en général, elle a progressivement mis l'accent sur les mots, puis sur les tropes et figures, puis sur la métaphore et la métonymie, puis sur la seule métaphore. Mais l'intérêt pour les mots a refait surface dans des disciplines comme la linguistique et la stylistique. Et l'intérêt pour les idées caractérise l'oeuvre de Ch. Perelman, comme en témoigne, entre autres, son Traité de (...)
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  48.  53
    L’androgynie Comme Modèle Hétéropolitique: Elisabeth Badinter, L’un est l’autre. Des relations entre hommes et femmes, Paris, éditions Odile et Jacob, 1987.Guy Bouchard - 1988 - Philosophiques 15 (1):210-220.
    Dans "L'un est l'autre. Des relations entre hommes et femmes", Élisabeth Badinter découpe l'histoire de l'humanité, du point de vue des rapports entre les sexes, en trois périodes, les deux premières inscrites sous le signe de la complémentarité, la troisième inaugurant l'ère de la ressemblance. Or, les deux modèles sous-jacents à cette évolution de l'humanité sont susceptibles de deux évaluations, l'une positive, l'autre négative, ce qui permet d'engendrer quatre types de civilisation: complémentarité positive ; complémentarité négative ; ressemblance positive ; (...)
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  49.  8
    Episcopal "Gesta" and the Creation of a Useful Past in Ninth-Century Auxerre.Constance B. Bouchard - 2009 - Speculum 84 (1):1-35.
    Medieval chroniclers frequently reworked the glorious memory of their past in order to meet the new needs of a new generation. To write the history of those who had come before was more than an exercise in antiquarianism, more than an effort to sort out long-ago events and put them in order. The creation of such a work grew out of a conversation with the records left by earlier generations and was intended to make a statement about the present as (...)
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  50.  72
    Le recours à l'auditoire universel implique-t-il une pétition de principe?Guy Bouchard - 1980 - Philosophiques 7 (2):161-188.
    La nouvelle rhétorique de Perelman identifie plusieurs types d'auditoires, dont l'auditoire spécialisé (un groupe de physiciens, les adeptes d'une religion) et l'auditoire universel ("l'ensemble de ceux qui sont considérés comme des hommes raisonnables et compétents en la matière"). Ce dernier se distingue des autres par son caractère fictif, car il est une construction mentale de l'orateur. Il pourrait donc reposer sur une pétition de principe, c'est-à-dire sur une ou des prémisses que l'on suppose admises alors qu'elles ne le sont pas. (...)
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