Results for 'Performative Utterances'

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  1. Performative Utterances.J. O. Urmson - 1977 - University of Minnesota.
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  2. Performative Utterances.J. L. Austin - 1961 - In J. O. Urmson & G. J. Warnock (eds.), Philosophical Papers. Clarendon Press.
     
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  3. Lies, Common Ground and Performative Utterances.Neri Marsili - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-12.
    In a recent book (Lying and insincerity, Oxford University Press, 2018), Andreas Stokke argues that one lies iff one says something one believes to be false, thereby proposing that it becomes common ground. This paper shows that Stokke’s proposal is unable to draw the right distinctions about insincere performative utterances. The objection also has repercussions on theories of assertion, because it poses a novel challenge to any attempt to define assertion as a proposal to update the common ground.
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    Performative Utterances.J. O. Urmson - 1977 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 2 (1):120-127.
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  5.  82
    Performative Utterances: A Reply to Bach and Harnish. [REVIEW]Marga Reimer - 1995 - Linguistics and Philosophy 18 (6):655 - 675.
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  6.  62
    Explicit Performative Utterances and Statements.Jane Heal - 1974 - Philosophical Quarterly 24 (95):106-121.
  7.  15
    Performative Utterances: Seven Puzzles.Robert Harnish - 2007 - Lodz Papers in Pragmatics 3:3-21.
    Performative Utterances: Seven Puzzles It was John Austin who introduced the word "performative" into the philosophy of language and linguistics. His original idea was that there are utterances which are more correctly characterized as doing something rather than stating something. Austin wrote: "when I say ‘I do’, I am not reporting on a marriage, I am indulging in it." As is well known, Austin went on to work out this notion of a performative utterance in (...)
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  8.  32
    Performative Utterances and Obligation in Hobbes.Geraint Parry - 1967 - Philosophical Quarterly 17 (68):246-252.
  9.  42
    Do Performative Utterances Have Any Constative Function?Richard M. Gale - 1970 - Journal of Philosophy 67 (5):117-121.
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  10.  54
    2. Performative Utterances.I. L. Austin - 2013 - In Maite Ezcurdia & Robert J. Stainton (eds.), The Semantics-Pragmatics Boundary in Philosophy. Broadview Press. pp. 21.
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  11. Meaning and Force: The Pragmatics of Performative Utterances.Frangois Recanati - 1987 - Cambridge University Press.
    Professor Recanati's book is a major new contribution to the philosophy of language. Its point of departure is a refutation of two views central to the work of speech-act theorists such as Austin & Searle: that speech acts are essentially conventional, & that the force of an utterance can be made fully explicit at the level of sentence-meaning & is in principle a matter of linguistic decoding. The author argues that no utterance can be fully understood simply in terms of (...)
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  12.  23
    Performative Utterances and the Concept of Contract.Robert Samek - 1965 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 43 (2):196 – 210.
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  13. Passionate and Performative Utterance: Morals of an Encounter.Stanley Cavell - 2005 - In Stanley Cavell & Russell B. Goodman (eds.), Contending with Stanley Cavell. Oxford University Press. pp. 177--198.
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  14. Hereby Explained: An Event-Based Account of Performative Utterances[REVIEW]Regine Eckardt - 2012 - Linguistics and Philosophy 35 (1):21-55.
    Several authors propose that performative speech acts are self-guaranteeing due to their self-referential nature (Searle 1989; Jary 2007). The present paper offers an analysis of self-referentiality in terms of truth conditional semantics, making use of Davidsonian events. I propose that hereby can denote the ongoing act of information transfer (more mundanely, the utterance) which thereby enters the meaning of the sentence. The analysis will be extended to cover self-referential sentences without the adverb hereby. While self-referentiality can be integrated in (...)
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  15. Geoffrey Hill and Performative Utterance.Maximilian De Gaynesford - unknown
    Utterance of a sentence in poetry can be performative, and explicitly so. The best-known of Geoffrey Hill’s critical essays denies this, but his own poetry demonstrates it. I clarify these claims and explain why they matter. What Hill denies illuminates anxieties about responsibility and commitment that poets and critics share with philosophers. What Hill demonstrates affords opportunities for mutual benefit between philosophy and criticism.
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  16. Meaning and Force: The Pragmatics of Performative Utterances.François RECANATI - 1987 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 23 (3):248-250.
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  17. The Pragmatics of Performative Utterances.Francois Recanati - 1998 - In Asa Kasher (ed.), Pragmatics: Critical Concepts. Routledge. pp. 511-518.
  18. The Judicial Judgement As Performative Utterance.Vincent Luizzi - 1980 - Southwest Philosophical Studies 5.
     
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  19.  11
    “Negro Expression” and Performative Utterances.Parker English - 2013 - Philosophia Africana 15 (1):61-70.
  20.  30
    'I Know' and Performative Utterances.Maxwell Wright - 1965 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 43 (1):35 – 47.
  21.  89
    How to Make the Distinction Between Constative and Performative Utterances.Klaus H. Jacobsen - 1971 - Philosophical Quarterly 21 (85):357-360.
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  22.  33
    Meaning and Force: The Pragmatics of Performative Utterances.Norman Brown - 1988 - Review of Metaphysics 42 (2):405-407.
    This book, a reworking of Les enonces performatifs, is perhaps the most interesting and sustained work in English on speech acts since Searle's influential work of that name published in 1969. Whether it is "a major new contribution to the philosophy of language" is more doubtful. It contains nuanced discussions of many of the writers who have nourished the Austin-Searle tradition over the last twenty years, including a number of French authors. But it suffers from being descended from a thesis; (...)
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  23.  34
    Meaning and Force: The Pragmatics of Performative Utterances.Diane Blakemore - 1989 - Mind and Language 4 (3):235-245.
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  24.  15
    Meaning and Force: The Pragmatics of Performative Utterances.Robert M. Harnish & Francois Recanati - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (2):297.
  25.  10
    The Concept of Authority and Performative Utterances.James F. Harris - 1970 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 8 (2-3):215-221.
  26.  2
    The Concept of Authority and Performative Utterances.James F. Harris - 1970 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 8 (2/3):215-221.
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  27. Sovereign Performatives in the Contemporary Scene of Utterance.Judith Butler - 1997 - Critical Inquiry 23 (2):350.
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  28.  22
    Performative, Passionate, and Parrhesiastic Utterance: On Cavell, Foucault, and Truth as an Ethical Force.Daniele Lorenzini - 2015 - Critical Inquiry 41 (2):254-268.
  29.  14
    From Performance to Passionate Utterance: Rethinking the Purpose of Restorative Conference Scripts in Schools.Naziya O’Reilly - 2017 - Ethics and Education 12 (2):170-183.
    In recent years restorative practice in schools has been heralded as a new paradigm for thinking about student behaviour. Its premise is to provide solutions to indiscipline, to restore relationships where there has been conflict or harm, and to give pupils a language with which to understand wrongdoing. This article offers a critique of practitioners’ use of scripts with which to facilitate the restorative conference, one of the key strategies of restorative practice. To do so I turn to J.L. Austin (...)
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  30.  30
    On Performatives Being Statements Too.Ori Simchen - 2021 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 10 (4):275-281.
    Performative utterances such as ‘I promise you to φ’, issued under suitable conditions, have been claimed by Austin (1962) to constitute the enactment of something rather than the stating of something. They are thus not to be assessed in terms of truth and falsity. Subsequent theorists have typically contested half of this Austinian view, agreeing that a performative utterance such as ‘I promise you to φ’ is the enactment of a promise, but claiming that it is also (...)
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  31. J. L Austin.Performative Utterances - 2008 - In Aloysius Martinich (ed.), The Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press. pp. 136.
     
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  32.  56
    Indexicals in Remote Utterances.Adrian Briciu - 2018 - Philosophia 46 (1):39-55.
    Recording devices are generally taken to present problems for the standard Kaplanian semantics for indexicals. In this paper, I argue that the remote utterance view offers the best way for the Kaplanian semantics to handle the recalcitrant data that comes from the use of recording devices. Following Sidelle I argue that recording devices allow agents to perform utterances at a distance. Using the essential, but widely ignored, distinction between tokens and utterances, I develop the view beyond the initial (...)
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  33.  13
    Texts as Performances: How to Reconstruct Webs of Beliefs From Expressed Utterances.Toby Reiner - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (3):266-289.
    This paper argues that historians of ideas must, when seeking to reconstruct webs of beliefs, interpret texts as though they were performances. As this is particularly the case with dialogic texts, the paper focuses on Plato's dialogues to show that the arguments expressed therein cannot be taken as expressions of Plato's beliefs. Rather, such arguments seek to prompt thought in their readers and thus reveal beliefs indirectly. We must therefore revise Mark Bevir's account of the reconstruction of webs of beliefs (...)
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  34. Why To Distinguish Performative And Constative Utterances?R. Pandey - 2001 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 28 (3):353-362.
     
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  35. Are Explicit Performatives Assertions?Mark Jary - 2007 - Linguistics and Philosophy 30 (2):207 - 234.
    This paper contributes to the study of explicit performative utterances in the following ways. First, it presents arguments that support Austin’s view that these utterances are not assertions. In doing so, it offers an original explanation of why they cannot be true or false. Second, it puts forward a new analysis of explicit performatives as cases of showing performing, rather than of instances of asserting or declaring that one is performing a particular act. Finally, it develops a (...)
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  36. Performative Force, Convention, and Discursive Injustice.Rebecca Kukla - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (2):440-457.
    I explore how gender can shape the pragmatics of speech. In some circumstances, when a woman deploys standard discursive conventions in order to produce a speech act with a specific performative force, her utterance can turn out, in virtue of its uptake, to have a quite different force—a less empowering force—than it would have if performed by a man. When members of a disadvantaged group face a systematic inability to produce a specific kind of speech act that they are (...)
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  37.  51
    Subsentential Utterances, Ellipsis, and Pragmatic Enrichment.Alison Hall - 2009 - Pragmatics and Cognition 17 (2):222-250.
    It is argued that genuinely subsentential phrases, such as a discourse-initial utterance of “From France” to indicate the provenance of an item, provide evidence for the reality of the pragmatic process of free enrichment. I consider recent attempts to treat such discourse-initial fragments as linguistic ellipsis of some kind while accommodating the difference between these cases and accepted types of ellipsis such as sluicing and gapping. I claim that the mechanisms they posit to save an ellipsis story have no role (...)
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  38.  67
    Utterance Meaning and Syntactic Ellipsis.Robert J. Stainton - 1997 - Pragmatics and Cognition 5 (1):51-78.
    Speakers often use ordinary words and phrases, unembedded in any sentence, to perform speech acts—or so it appears. In some cases appearances are deceptive: The seemingly lexical/phrasal utterance may really be an utterance of a syntactically eplliptical sentence. I argue however that, at least sometimes, plain old words and phrases are used on their own. The use of both words/phrases and elliptical sentences leads to two consequences: 1. Context must contribute more to utterance meaning than is often supposed. Here's why: (...)
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  39. In Deixis in der Mensch-Maschine-Interaktion, Dagmar Schmauks Deals with the Phenomenon Of'multimediale Referentenidentifikation'. This Means That Various Sign Systems Are Used When Performing an Utterance. Schmauks (Pp. 12f.) Points Out That One has to Differentiate Between Two Types of Sign Systems: Those of Natural Languages and That of Nonverbal. [REVIEW]Dagmar Schmauks - 1993 - Semiotica 96:319.
     
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  40. Performatives.Kent Bach - manuscript
    Paradoxical though it may seem, there are certain things one can do just by saying what one is doing. This is possible if one uses a verb that names the very sort of act one is performing. Thus one can thank someone by saying 'Thank you', fire someone by saying 'You're fired', and apologize by saying 'I apologize'. These are examples of 'explicit performative utterances', statements in form but not in fact. Or so thought their discoverer, J. L. (...)
     
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  41. Uttering Sentences Made Up of Words and Gestures.Philippe De Brabanter - 2007 - In E. Romero & B. Soria (eds.), Explicit Communication: Robyn Carston's Pragmatics.
    Human communication is multi-modal. It is an empirical fact that many of our acts of communication exploit a variety of means to make our communicative intentions recognisable. Scholars readily distinguish between verbal and non-verbal means of communication, and very often they deal with them separately. So it is that a great number of semanticists and pragmaticists give verbal communication preferential treatment. The non-verbal aspects of an act of communication are treated as if they were not underlain by communicative intentions. They (...)
     
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  42.  40
    Passionate Utterance and Moral Education.Ian Munday - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (1):57-74.
    This paper explores Stanley Cavell's notion of ‘passionate utterance’, which acts as an extension of/departure from J. L. Austin's theory of the performative. Cavell argues that Austin having made the revolutionary discovery that truth claims in language are bound up with how words perform, then gets bogged by convention when discussing what is done ‘by’ words. In failing to account for the less predictable, unconventional aspects of language, the latter therefore washes his hands of the expressive passionate aspects of (...)
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  43. Words as Deeds: Wittgenstein's ''Spontaneous Utterances'' and the Dissolution of the Explanatory Gap.Daniele Moyal-Sharrock - 2000 - Philosophical Psychology 13 (3):355 – 372.
    Wittgenstein demystified the notion of 'observational self-knowledge'. He dislodged the long-standing conception that we have privileged access to our impressions, sensations and feelings through introspection, and more precisely eliminated knowing as the kind of awareness that normally characterizes our first-person present-tense psychological statements. He was not thereby questioning our awareness of our emotions or sensations, but debunking the notion that we come to that awareness via any epistemic route. This makes the spontaneous linguistic articulation of our sensations and impressions nondescriptive. (...)
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  44. Performatives and Imperatives.Anna Brożek - 2011 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 7 (2):17-34.
    The term “performative” is used in at least two different senses. In the first sense, performatives are generatives, i.e. expressions by the use of which one creates new deontic states of affairs on the ground of extralinguistic conventions. In the second sense, performatives are operatives, i.e. expressions which contain verbal predicates and state their own utterances. In the article, both these types of expressions are compared to the class of imperatives which are characterized as expressions of the form (...)
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  45. Thank You for Dying for Our Country: Commemorative Texts and Performances in Jerusalem.Chaim Noy - 2015 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Combining ethnographic, semiotic, and performative approaches, this book examines texts and accompanying acts of writing of national commemoration. The commemorative visitor book is viewed as a mobilized stage, a communication medium, where visitors' public performances are presented, and where acts of participation are authored and composed. The study contextualizes the visitor book within the material and ideological environment where it is positioned and where it functions. The semiotics of commemoration are mirrored in the visitor book, which functions as a (...)
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  46.  16
    Performatives in Cypriot, Greek and Polish Texts of Normative Acts. A Comparative Study.Karolina Gortych-Michalak - 2014 - Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric 38 (1):103-122.
    The theory of speech acts, formulated by Austin and developed by Searle, is widely applied to analyse and classify various speech acts. In this paper it is assumed that legal texts, especially normative acts i.e. constitutions and statutes, are direct speech acts. Normative acts are linguistic entities and they do not exist outside the language, thus the theory of speech acts may be applied to examine them. They are also considered to be performative utterances according to Austin’s classification. (...)
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  47.  74
    Performatives and Antiperformatives.Ingvar Johansson - 2003 - Linguistics and Philosophy 26 (6):661-702.
    The paper highlights a certain kind of self-falsifying utterance, which I shall call antiperformative assertions, not noted in speech-act theory thus far. By taking such assertions into account, the old question whether explicit performatives have a truth-value can be resolved. I shall show that explicit performatives are in fact self-verifyingly true, but they are not related to propositions the way ordinary assertions are; antiperformatives have the same unusual relation to propositions, but are self-falsifyingly false. Explicit performatives are speech acts performed (...)
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  48.  26
    The Performativity of Personhood.Catherine Mills - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):325-325.
    In debates on infanticide, including the recent defence of so-called ‘after-birth abortion’, philosophers generally treat the term ‘the person’ as descriptive, such that statements claiming that something is a person can be considered true or false, depending on the characteristics of that thing. This obscures important aspects of its usage. J L Austen identified a subset of speech acts as performative, in that they do things in their very declaration or utterance. They do not simply describe states of affairs (...)
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  49. How to Establish Authority with Words: Imperative Utterances and Presupposition Accommodation.Maciej Witek - 2013 - In Anna Brożek (ed.), Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science at Warsaw University, Warszawa 2013. pp. 145-157.
    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it aims at providing an account of an indirect mechanism responsible for establishing one's power to issue biding directive acts; second, it is intended as a case for an externalist account of illocutionary interaction. The mechanism in question is akin to what David Lewis calls presupposition accommodation: a rule-governed process whereby the context of an utterance is adjusted to make the utterance acceptable; the main idea behind the proposed account is that the (...)
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  50.  91
    The Reflexivity of Explicit Performatives.Cristina Corredor - 2009 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 24 (3):283-299.
    The aim of this contribution is to propose a natural implementation of the reflexive-referential theory advanced by Perry 2001 that aims at accounting for the reflexive character of explicit performative utterances. This is accomplished by introducing a reflexive-performative constraint on explicit performatives.
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