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Summary

How do we perceive art in relation to our cultural environment? This complex question calls for a close examination of the interactive mechanisms between two fields of knowledge and praxis that transform societies.

Aesthetics, encompassing the philosophy of beauty and the study of sensory perception, plays a fundamental role in how individuals and communities interact with and interpret their cultural surroundings. By exploring the dynamic relationship between aesthetics and culture, we gain insights into the profound impact of artistic expression on societal values, beliefs, and identity formation. Drawing upon interdisciplinary research and critical analyses, this section sheds light on how the reception of art, in its various forms, reflects, influences, and transforms societies. It underscores the importance of recognizing the dynamic nature of aesthetics and culture, and the need for fostering dialogue, appreciation, and understanding across diverse artistic expressions. Moreover, it emphasizes the role of aesthetics and cultural awareness in shaping a harmonious and inclusive society where artistic diversity thrives.

Aesthetics has the power to challenge existing norms, provoke thought, and inspire cultural transformation. In a sense, artists throughout history have used their creations to challenge social conventions, spark political movements, and redefine cultural boundaries. Artistic expressions that deviate from the established aesthetic norms often become powerful agents of change, encouraging critical dialogue and pushing society to question and reevaluate its values and beliefs. For example, the Cubist movement of the early 20th century, led by artists such as Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, revolutionized the perception of visual art by breaking away from traditional representational forms and introducing abstract and fragmented perspectives. This artistic innovation not only reshaped the visual arts but also had a profound impact on broader cultural narratives, challenging conventional notions of reality and perception.

Artistic expressions reflect the values, aspirations, and concerns of a society, offering a mirror through which cultural values can be observed. Aesthetics provides a platform for artists to express their interpretation of the world around them, reflecting social, political, and cultural realities. For instance, Renaissance art celebrated humanism and the revival of classical ideals, while Romantic art in the 19th century emphasized emotion, individuality, and the sublime. By analyzing the aesthetics of a particular time period, we can gain insights into the prevailing social and cultural attitudes of that era. The works of art serve as cultural artifacts that preserve and communicate the values, narratives, and ideologies of a society.

Aesthetics plays a vital role in preserving cultural heritage and traditions. Art forms such as traditional music, dance, and craftsmanship embody cultural knowledge, rituals, and historical narratives. By engaging with these aesthetic expressions, communities can maintain and transmit their cultural identities across generations. Cultural preservation through aesthetics not only safeguards the tangible and intangible aspects of a culture but also fosters a sense of pride and belonging within communities. Furthermore, the aesthetics associated with cultural preservation can be a source of inspiration for contemporary artists, providing a rich tapestry of ideas, techniques, and symbols that can be reinterpreted and incorporated into new artistic expressions.

In a nutshell, aesthetics exerts a profound influence on culture by serving as a catalyst for change, a reflection of societal values, and a tool for cultural preservation. By embracing diverse aesthetic expressions, societies can broaden their understanding of cultural narratives, challenge established norms, and foster a sense of cultural identity. Recognizing the intricate relationship between aesthetics and culture is essential for appreciating the transformative power of art and its role in shaping the societies we inhabit.

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221 found
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  1. Analytic Aesthetics and the Dilemma of Timelessness.Derek Allan - manuscript
    Explores the failure of analytic aesthetics to examine the question of the capacity of art to transcend time, and its own commitment – seldom explicitly acknowledged – to the assumption that this capacity functions through the traditional, but no longer viable, notion of timelessness inherited from Enlightenment aesthetics.
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  2. Chess composition as an art.Miro Brada - manuscript
    The article presents the chess composition as a logical art, with concrete examples. It began with Arabic mansuba, and later evolved to new-strategy designed by Italian Alberto Mari. The redefinition of mate (e.g. mate with a free field) or a theme to quasi-pseudo theme, opens the new space for combinations, and enables to connect it with other fields like computer science. The article was exhibited in Holland Park, W8 6LU, The Ice House between 18. Oct - 3. Nov. 2013.
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  3. From the University of Life is Elsewhere to Boris Čulina.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    I interpret Boris Čulina’s paper, which depicts a relationship between a grandfather and a grandchild, by comparing it with Milan Kundera’s Life is Elsewhere. That leads me to a problem of how to interpret the photograph. Warning: this paper contains a frightening tale.
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  4. On the exhaustion criterion of difficulty, with Wittgenstein, Robert Graves, and Kripke.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    The philosopher and builder Ludwig Wittgenstein remarks that architecture is more difficult than philosophy. He suggests an exhaustion criterion for how difficult a discipline is: a field is more difficult the more exhausting it is. I make a case against this claim. There was once a demand to prevent the Greek myths from establishing themselves in the curriculum by means of “our own rival myths.” It is difficult to compete with a renowned Greek myth, but if one does produce a (...)
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  5. Pure Visuality: Notes on Intellection & Form in Art & Architecture.Gavin Keeney - manuscript
    Diaristic, mixed notes on: John Ruskin's The Poetry of Architecture (1837) and Modern Painters (1885); Caravaggio, Victorian Aesthetes, G.K. Chesterton, and Tacita Dean; Jay Fellows' Ruskin’s Maze: Mastery and Madness in His Art (1981); Slavoj Žižek at Jack Tilton Gallery, New York, New York, USA, April 23, 2009, “Architectural Parallax: Spandrels and Other Phenomena of Class Struggle”; “Titian, Tintoretto, Veronese: Rivals in Renaissance Venice”, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, March 15-August 16, 2009; Janet Harbord, Chris Marker: La Jetée (...)
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  6. Imagining Dinosaurs.Michel-Antoine Xhignesse - forthcoming - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
    There is a tendency to take mounted dinosaur skeletons at face value, as the raw data on which the science of paleontology is founded. But the truth is that mounted dinosaur skeletons are substantially intention-dependent—they are artifacts. More importantly, I argue, they are also substantially imagination-dependent: their production is substantially causally reliant on preparators’ creative imaginations, and their proper reception is predicated on audiences’ recreative imaginations. My main goal here is to show that dinosaur skeletal mounts are plausible candidates for (...)
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  7. Selective Breeding and the Birth of Philosophy.Costin Alamariu - 2023 - Independently published.
    Based on his dissertation (Yale). -/- This is an argument that philosophy is born with and dependent on the idea of nature; and that this idea was first discovered or manifested in the perception of biological reality, in particular the perception of hereditary transmission of physical and behavioral qualities, together with the perception that moral and legal codes are relative and contingent. It was generally only within the spiritual and intellectual horizon of certain types of aristocracies to have access to (...)
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  8. State of the Art - Elements for Critical Thinking and Doing.Erich Berger, Mari Keski-Korsu, Marietta Radomska & Line Thastum (eds.) - 2023 - Helsinki: Bioart Society.
    How to participate proactively in a process of change and transformation, to shape our path within an uncertain future? With this publication, the State Of The Art Network marks a waypost on a journey which started in 2018, when like-minded Nordic and Baltic art organisations and professionals initiated this network as a multidisciplinary collaboration facing the Anthropocene. Over five years, ten organisations and around 80 practitioners from different disciplines, like the arts, natural sciences and humanities came together, online and in (...)
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  9. "Belleza" de Hans-Georg Gadamer y "Belleza y burguesía" de Odo Marquard: Introducción, traducción y notas de Facundo Bey.Facundo Norberto Bey - 2023 - Boletín de Estética 65:73-93.
    Resumen: Este texto introduce la primera traducción al español de los textos Schönheit [Belleza] de Hans-Georg Gadamer (trabajo escrito en los años ’70 y que vio la luz en alemán póstumamente en 2007) y Schönheit und Bürgerlichkeit [Belleza y burguesía] de Odo Marquard, publicado también en 2007 como respuesta demorada al trabajo del filósofo de Marburgo. Gadamer explora el desarrollo histórico del concepto de belleza en los siglos XIX y XX, poniendo énfasis en que la belleza siguió y seguirá siendo (...)
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  10. Aesthetic Testimony and Aesthetic Authenticity.Felix Bräuer - 2023 - British Journal of Aesthetics 63 (3):395–416.
    Relying on aesthetic testimony seems problematic. For instance, it seems problematic for me to simply believe or assert that The Velvet Underground's debut album The Velvet Underground and Nico (1964) is amazing solely because you have told me so, even though I know you to be an honest and competent music critic. But why? After all, there do not seem to be similar reservations regarding testimony from many other domains. In this paper, I will argue that relying on aesthetic testimony (...)
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  11. Imperfectionist Aesthetics in Art and Everyday Life.Peter Cheyne (ed.) - 2023 - London: Routledge.
    This book presents interdisciplinary research on the aesthetics of perfection and imperfection. Broadening this growing field, it connects the aesthetics of imperfection with issues in areas including philosophy, music, literature, urban environment, architecture, art theory, and cultural studies. -/- The contributors to this volume argue that imperfection has value in being open and inclusive. The aesthetics of imperfection is thus typified by organic, unpolished production and the avoidance of perfect finish, instead representing living and natural change, and opposing the consumerist (...)
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  12. Heyes’s Introduction to Anaesthetics of Existence: Essays on Experience on the Edge.Cressida J. Heyes - 2023 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 9 (2).
    In this short introduction to my monograph Anaesthetics of Existence, I explain the origin of the book in a mishearing of Foucault’s phrase “an aesthetics of existence” and outline the book’s method (a melding of genealogy and phenomenology) and its subject: the politics of experience, and especially how to think about undergoings that either are excluded from experience or happen at its edges. The book contains a chapter on Foucault and this new method; one on sexual violence against unconscious victims; (...)
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  13. Affective Responses to Music: An Affective Science Perspective.Federico Lauria - 2023 - Philosophies 8 (2):16.
    Music has strong emotional powers. How are we to understand affective responses to music? What does music teach us about emotions? Why are musical emotions important? Despite the rich literature in philosophy and the empirical sciences, particularly psychology and neuroscience, little attention has been paid to integrating these approaches. This extensive review aims to redress this imbalance and establish a mutual dialogue between philosophy and the empirical sciences by presenting the main philosophical puzzles from an affective science perspective. The chief (...)
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  14. How to Know a City: The Epistemic Value of City Tours.Pilar Lopez-Cantero & Catherine Robb - 2023 - Philosophy of the City Journal 1 (1):31-41.
    When travelling to a new city, we acquire knowledge about its physical terrain, directions, historical facts and aesthetic features. Engaging in tourism practices, such as guided walking tours, provides experiences of a city that are necessarily mediated and partial. This has led scholars in tourism studies, and more recently in philosophy, to question the epistemological value of city tours, critiquingthem as passive, lacking in autonomous agency, and providing misrepresentative experiences of the city. In response, we argue that the mediated and (...)
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  15. A Garden of One's Own, or Why Are There No Great Lady Detectives?Shelby Moser & Michel-Antoine Xhignesse - 2023 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 9 (1):1-20.
    Although the character of the “lady detective”is a staple of the cozy mystery genre, we contend that there are no great lady detectives to rival Holmes or Poirot. This is not because there are no clever or interesting lady detective characters, but ratherbecause the concept of greatness is sociallyconstructed and, like coolness, depends on public acclaim and perception. We explore the mechanics of genre formation, arguing that the very structure of cozy mysteries precludes female greatness. To create a “great”character,theauthor cannot (...)
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  16. A vida como jogo e a arte como ofício em Simônides e Nietzsche: a existência do risco na aparência.Gabriel Herkenhoff Coelho Moura - 2023 - O Que Nos Faz Pensar 30 (50):p. 38-66.
    Simônides de Ceos foi um poeta lírico grego cuja obra é marcada pela atenção à problemática da existência humana e cuja distinção é a visão do fazer poético como atividade propriamente humana. Nietzsche nutria grande admiração por Simônides desde o tempo de sua formação intelectual, como revela sua correspondência dos anos sessenta. Além disso, em seus cadernos e em dois aforismos de sua obra publicada, o filósofo apresenta interessantes reflexões sobre o poeta. Em uma delas, afirma que Simônides aconselhava os (...)
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  17. Traditional literary interpretation versus subversive interpretation.Terence Rajivan Edward - 2022 - Asian Journal of Advances in Research 16 (3):34-39.
    I present some objections to traditional literary interpretation and consider subversive interpretation as a solution to these problems. Subversive interpretation may seem more scientific and more democratic than traditional interpretation, but it is open to doubt that it is more democratic.
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  18. Really Boring Art.Andreas Elpidorou & John Gibson - 2022 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 8 (30):190-218.
    There is little question as to whether there is good boring art, though its existence raises a number of questions for both the philosophy of art and the philosophy of emotions. How can boredom ever be a desideratum of art? How can our standing commitments concerning the nature of aesthetic experience and artistic value accommodate the existence of boring art? How can being bored constitute an appropriate mode of engagement with a work of art as a work of art? More (...)
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  19. Practising collectivity: Performing public space in everyday China.Teresa Hoskyns, Siti Balkish Roslan & Claudia Westermann - 2022 - Technoetic Arts 20 (3):203-224.
    This article investigates the specific cultural and collaborative nature of China’s public spaces and how they are formed through performative appropriations. Collective cultural practices as political participation were encouraged during the Mao era when cultural activities played a key role in workers’ education and participation. Since the opening-up period, performance in public space has become widespread in China and creates alternative community spaces that constitute alternatives to capitalist spaces of consumption. Using Habermas’s theory of communicative action, we argue that cultural (...)
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  20. The Philosophy of Humor: What makes Something Funny.Chris A. Kramer - 2022 - 1000-Word Philosophy: An Introductory Anthology.
    People can laugh at almost anything. What’s the deal with that? What makes something funny? -/- This essay reviews some theories of what it is for something to be funny. Each theory offers insights into this question, but no single approach provides a comprehensive answer.
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  21. The Musicality of Speech.James H. P. Lewis - 2022 - Philosophers' Imprint 22.
    It is common for people to be sensitive to aesthetic qualities in one another’s speech. We allow the loveliness or unloveliness of a person’s voice to make impressions on us. What is more, it is also common to allow those aesthetic impressions to affect how we are inclined to feel about the speaker. We form attitudes of liking, trusting, disliking or distrusting partly in virtue of the aesthetic qualities of a person’s speech. In this paper I ask whether such attitudes (...)
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  22. Weaponizing Culture: A Limited Defense of the Destruction of Cultural Heritage in War.Duncan MacIntosh - 2022 - In Claire Finkelstein, Derek Gillman & Frederik Rosén (eds.), The Preservation of Art and Culture in Times of War. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 97-128.
    It is widely thought that stealing, trading and destroying cultural artifacts in time of war are inherently immoral actions, and that it is right that they be treated as war crimes, which, indeed, they currently are. But oppressive cultures have their heritage and cultural artifacts too, in the form of monuments, sites of worship, and so on; and for the oppressed, these things may be awful reminders of their subordination, and may even perpetuate it. This chapter suggests that, since cultural (...)
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  23. Drawing the Line: What to Do with the Work of Immoral Artists from Museums to the Movies.Erich Hatala Matthes - 2022 - New York: Oxford University Press USA.
    Can we still watch Woody Allen's movies? Can we still laugh at Bill Cosby's jokes? Woody Allen, Kevin Spacey, Dave Chappelle, Louis C. K., J.K. Rowling, Michael Jackson, Roseanne Barr. Recent years have proven rife with revelations about the misdeeds, objectional views, and, in some instances, crimes of popular artists.
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  24. Immoral Artists and Our Aesthetic Projects: A Commentary on Mary Beth Willard's Why It's OK to Enjoy the Work of Immoral Artists.Erich Hatala Matthes - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (4):517-525.
    This essay discusses Mary Beth Willard's _Why It's OK to Enjoy the Work of Immoral Artists_ and puts it into dialogue with my book _Drawing the Line._ In particular, I focus on the role of aesthetic projects in thinking about artistic immorality, and develop further thoughts on the public/private and individual/social distinctions with respect to our engagement with the arts.
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  25. Which Side are You On? The Class Consciousness of Punk.Tiffany Elise Montoya - 2022 - Chicago: Open Universe. Edited by Joshua Heter & Richard Greene.
    Both the music and subculture of punk historically arose from disaffected working-class youth. This socio-economic starting point was absolutely crucial for making punk what it is. However, along with this standpoint came various levels of class consciousness that we can see evidence of in the lyrics and in various practices of people within the scene itself. I divide this consciousness into 3 specific levels of structural understanding and agency. Inspired by Georg Lukacs' analysis of class consciousness and Antonio Gramsci's theory (...)
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  26. Art, artefact and nature in Gillo Dorfles’s work. For an understanding of our aesthetic constitution.Filomena Parente - 2022 - Debates in Aesthetics 17 (2):39-53.
    Where Gillo Dorfles sees an ‘aesthetic quotient’ able to promote a right relationship between man and nature, and nature and artefact, the concept of objectualization accounts for the ambivalent consequences of man’s appropriation of nature, occurring in the shaping of reality. This concept appears in the arts but also in the production of ordinary man-made objects. The latter recalibrates our own understanding of art and nature. Starting from a definition of objectualization, the hypothesis of an equation between ar- tificiality and (...)
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  27. Art Criticism in the Contracted Field1.Matthew Bowman - 2021 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 79 (2):200-212.
    Just over a decade-and-a-half ago, a roundtable discussion published in the pages of October worried that the periodic renewal of critical discourses had slowed to a standstill and that art criticism was faced with obsolescence. Such an obsolescence should be understood in a broadly Hegelian manner: the danger is not that art criticism would disappear from the cultural field, but that it will continue—although drained of its previous necessity. Such fears perhaps run the risk of exaggeration, yet this article shall (...)
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  28. The Complexity of Play: A Response to Guyer’s Analysis of Play in Schiller’s Letters on the Aesthetic Education of Man.Kate Brelje - 2021 - In Malcolm MacLean & Wendy Russell (eds.), Play, Philosophy and Performance. New York: Routledge. pp. 142-155.
    In the Letters on the Aesthetic Education of Man (Aesthetic Letters), Friedrich Schiller asserts the importance of play for human beings. He claims, “man only plays when he is in the fullest sense of the word a human being, and he is only fully a human being when he plays” (Schiller, 2005, 131). Play is so pivotal that it qualifies as the activity resonating the state of human fullness. So, naturally, one might ask, what does play consist in for Schiller? (...)
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  29. Materiality and sublimation in Dan Flavin's luminous minimalism.Vangelis Giannakakis - 2021 - Zeitschrift für Ästhetik Und Allgemeine Kunstwissenschaft (Special issue / Sonderheft 19):313-330.
    Modern aesthetic Minimalism is neither a flight to abstract spirituality, nor an extracting process of a primordial essence. It is concerned, rather, with the aesthetic object as pure refiguration and the production of “concrete universality”, of form as content and possibility of itself. This becomes especially apparent in the Minimalism of the 1960s. The main focus of this paper will be on Dan Flavin’s luminous minimalism. The latter is characterised by a style that, though simple in appearance, introduced a higher (...)
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  30. Industrial Modernism and the Hegelian Dialectic in Winslow Homer.Trevor Griffith - 2021 - Labyrinth: An International Journal for Philosophy, Value Theory and Sociocultural Hermeneutics 23 (1):166-183.
    This paper looks at the themes of nature, humanity, and military and industrial development in the nineteenth century American painter Winslow Homer through the lens of the Hegelian theory of art. Robert Pippin's After the Beautiful has recently put the Hegelian framework to very fruitful use in understanding pictorial modernism. This study of Homer follows a similar approach but argues that Homer's canvases represent a development in the modern spirt which, in many ways, goes beyond the canvases of Manet – (...)
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  31. Truth in Visual Media: Aesthetics, Ethics and Politics.Marguerite La Caze & Ted Nannicelli - 2021 - Edinburgh, UK: Edinburgh University Press.
    This book investigates the interrelations between aesthetics, ethics and politics in a variety of visual media forms, ranging across art installations, film and television, interactive documentaries, painting, photography, social media and videogames. An international mix of emerging and established authors, with interdisciplinary expertise, explores how different ethical questions, political implications and aesthetic pleasures arise and shape one another in distinct visual media. Investigating themes such as the use of cinema as a medium for ethical and political thought, how documentary subjects (...)
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  32. Von Bildimpulsen zu Vitality Semiotics. Affordanz und Rahmen (frames) aus kunstgeschichtlicher Sichtweise am Beispiel der Exekias-Schale in München.Martina Sauer - 2021 - In Mehrdeutigkeiten: Rahmentheorien und Affordanzkonzepte in den Archäologischen Bildwissenschaften, edited by Elisabeth Günther and Johanna Fabricius. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2021 (Philippika ; 147). pp. 79-103.
    To relate theories of affordance and frame with the tradition of formal aesthetics, philosophical iconology and the life sciences (keyword Vitality Semiotics) is the starting point of the paper. According to this approach, the structural preconditions of images, as determined by materials, techniques and the composition of the design means, become essential. Through these structures, the producers are able to set impulses that become decisive for the interpretation of space and time or the "scene" as a dynamic event. Against the (...)
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  33. On Globes, the Earth and the Cybernetics of Grace.Claudia Westermann - 2021 - Technoetic Arts 19 (1):29-47.
    Following the traces of Margaret Mead’s statement that emphasized that the first photographic images of the Earth from space presented notions of fragility, the article contextualizes the recent critique of the dominant representation of the Earth as a globe that emerged in conjunction with the discourse on the Anthropocene. It analyses the globe as an image and the sentiments that accompanied it since the first photographs of our planet from space were published in 1968. The article outlines how the cultural (...)
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  34. James O. Young, "Radically Rethinking Copyright in the Arts: A Philosophical Approach.". [REVIEW]Michel-Antoine Xhignesse - 2021 - Philosophy in Review 41 (1):49-51.
    A review of James Young's "Radically Rethinking Copyright in the Arts: A Philosophical Approach" (Routledge 2020).
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  35. Beauty, Art and the Western Tradition.Derek Allan - 2020 - In Matthew Del Nevo, Robert Andrews & Rohan Curnow (eds.), Beauty and the Christian Tradition. St Paul's Publications. pp. 1-21.
    Examines the birth of art-as-beauty in Western art and the concomitant birth of the idea of art itself. Also discusses the death of art-as-beauty from Manet onward and certain implications for aesthetics (the philosophy of art). Includes relevant reproductions. (The essay is a longer version of my paper "The Birth and Death of Beauty in Western Art" also listed on PhilPapers.).
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  36. A sereia e o desavisado: Ideologia Francesa, crítica dialética e a “matéria brasileira”.Raphael F. Alvarenga - 2020 - Sinal de Menos 14:228-62.
    Since the 1980s, there have been many attempts to bring together Critical Theory of Frankfurtian strain and French theories generally referred to as poststructuralist. The present text seeks to readdress the problem of their tricky articulation by taking a look at some vicissitudes those two currents of thought underwent in Brazil. In addition to the risk – embedded in the Parisian passion for dissolution – of positivizing atrocious aspects of Brazilian society related to the country’s multi-secular informality and backwardness, what (...)
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  37. Viscarra, Nietzsche: Las virtudes del genio y la comunicación de la “cultura superior”. Viscarra, Nietzsche. The virtues of genius and the communication of "superior culture".Osman Choque-Aliaga - 2020 - Journal de Comunicación Social 10 (10):147-165.
    Bolivian writer Victor Hugo Viscarra is a constant figure on whom a good number of readers have focused their attention. Review after review of his work has been appearing in the Bolivian press and, in that sense, readers have taken his writings with a blind acceptance omitting in such a way a position that goes beyond the literary frontier. The existence of any work on Viscarra’s role as a thinker, his views on politics, the customs of society itself or the (...)
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  38. Understanding Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts.Jay Friedenberg - 2020 - Amazon Direct.
    What is art? What is beauty? Why are we driven to create? People have been struggling with the answers to these questions for millenia. In this book Jay Friedenberg examines age old and contemporary responses to the perceptual and performative side of aesthetics. The work is wide-ranging in scope, addressing all forms of art including painting, photography, writing, film, music, theater, dance, and more. Issues are examined from multiple perspectives with separate chapters on history, philosophy, mathematics, physics, psychology, and neuroscience. (...)
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  39. Early body ornamentation as Ego-culture: Tracing the co-evolution of aesthetic ideals and cultural identity.Antonis Iliopoulos - 2020 - Semiotica 2020 (232):187-233.
    While the “symbolic” meaning of early body ornamentation has received the lion’s share of attention in the debate on human origins, this paper sets out to explore their aesthetic and agentive dimensions, for the purpose of explaining how various ornamental forms would have led interacting groups to form a cultural identity of their own. To this end, semiotics is integrated with a new paradigm in the archaeology of mind, known as the theory of material engagement. Bridging specifically Peirce’s pragmatic theory (...)
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  40. A Layered, Bounded, Integrated Approach to Research on the Arts Across Disciplines.Dominic McIver Lopes - 2020 - Leonardo 53 (5):537-541.
    Cooperation among arts scholars is thought to be hampered by the division of research on the arts into two cultures, one scientific, one humanistic. This paper proposes an alternative model for research into the arts wherein multiple levels of explanation focussed on well-bounded phenomena integrate research across academic disciplines. Two case studies of research that fits the model are presented.
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  41. Desolation Sound: Social Practices of Natural Beauty.Dominic McIver Lopes - 2020 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 9 (4):266–273.
    Instances of natural beauty are widely regarded as counterexamples to practice-based theories of aesthetic value. They are not. To see that they are not, we require the correct account of natural beauty and the correct account of social practices.
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  42. Art works for isolates.Paul O'Halloran - 2020 - Dissertation, University of Melbourne
    In a Covid-19 world, everyone’s circumstances changed. Most of us are living and or working in quarantine or lockdown. There is evidence that lockdown itself can have serious negative psychological impact (Brooks et al., 2020). Nonetheless, strategies are being proposed which, arguably, mitigate these harms. Artmaking is one such strategy. As ‘art therapy’, it has been usefully deployed to address a wide range of mental health challenges including anxiety, depression, fatigue and post-traumatic stress (Regev & Cohen-Yatziv, 2018). Given that these (...)
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  43. A Comedian and a Fascist Walk into Freud's Bar: On the Mass Character of Stand‐Up Comedy.Martin Shuster - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 78 (4):525-534.
    This article explores the psychoanalytic points of commonality between stand‐up comedy shows and fascist rallies, arguing that both are concerned with the creation of a “mass” audience. The article explores the political significance of this analogy by arguing that while stand‐up shows are not as regressive as fascist rallies, their “mass” character does run counter to any political aspirations they may have toward the end of critical consciousness raising.
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  44. Affizierende Oberflächen, affektive Benutzung und algorithmische Rationalität.Judith Siegmund - 2020 - Internationales Jahrbuch Für Medienphilosophie 6 (1):195-202.
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  45. The Fruit Fly, the Vermin, and the Prokurist: Operations of Appearing in Kafka’s Metamorphosis.Katrin Trüstedt - 2020 - In Jörg Dünne, Kathrin Fehringer, Kristina Kuhn & Wolfgang Struck (eds.), Cultural Techniques: Assembling Spaces, Texts & Collectives. De Gruyter. pp. 295-315.
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  46. Chinese Landscape Aesthetics: the Exchange and Nurturing of Emotions.Claudia Westermann - 2020 - In Jutta Kehrer (ed.), New Horizons: Eight Perspectives on Chinese Landscape Architecture Today. Basel, Switzerland: pp. 34-37.
    "[..] flowing with the waters, halting with the mountains. In the images of light and wind the ephemeral is inscribed. Time is part of space. The scene performs." -/- The essay "Chinese Landscape Aesthetics: the exchange and nurturing of emotions" by Claudia Westermann included in "New Horizons: Eight Perspectives on Chinese Landscape Architecture Today" introduces ideas of landscape in traditional Chinese thought. Following the etymology of the Chinese terms for landscape and recognizing that their conceptual focus is on the exchange (...)
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  47. Aproximaciones teóricas a la danza.Carlos Eduardo Sanabria Bohórquez & Sheyla Lusseth Yurivilca Aguilar - 2019 - Bogota, Colombia: Fundación Integrando Fronteras & Idartes.
    Aproximaciones teóricas a la danza es producto de un trabajo investigativo conjunto que permite la circulación del conocimiento producido por distintos actores involucrados en el campo de la danza en Colombia. Para la Red de Investigación Cuerpo Danza Movimiento, esta publicación es un logro investigativo colectivo que ofrece una visión del conjunto de esfuerzos y perspectivas actuales sobre la danza en Colombia y en otras latitudes en donde este arte se ha ido convirtiendo en un objeto de estudio específico. En (...)
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  48. Review of Illuminations by Walter Benjamin. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2019 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 124 (7):576 & 582.
    This review highlights how fascism and populism qua, popular culture feeds each other. Hannah Arendt's introduction too is commented upon.
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  49. La sociedad del espectáculo de Guy Debord: 50 años después.José Ramón Fabelo Corzo - 2019 - In Mayra Sánchez Medina & José Ramón Fabelo-Corzo (eds.), Coordenadas epistemológicas para una estética en construcción. Puebla, Pue., México: Colección La Fuente. pp. 259-274.
    En 1967, el francés Guy Debord escribía un resonante texto, La sociedad del espectáculo, en el que nos ofrece una penetrante y aguda reflexión sobre la sociedad de consumo —cuya experiencia directa vive en la Francia de la posguerra—, donde florece la economía de la abundancia, la industria del ocio, la generalización de los medios de comunicación audiovisual y la propagación del llamado american way of life. Anclado fuertemente en las ideas de Marx sobre la alienación y el fetichismo mercantil, (...)
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  50. Ally Aesthetics.Jeremy Fried - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 77 (4):447-459.
    In this article I discuss what I am calling “ally aesthetics.” I suggest a set of necessary, though not necessarily sufficient, considerations for the creation of successful instances of ally art. Focusing on three case studies, I propose some key characteristics of ally aesthetics, such as its contextual/temporal nature and how that relates to success and the importance of understanding the place of the ally aesthetic within the larger movements they are allying with.
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