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Karen Stohr [22]Karen E. Stohr [2]Karen Elizabeth Stohr [1]
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Karen Stohr
Georgetown University
  1. Kantian Beneficence and the Problem of Obligatory Aid.Karen Stohr - 2011 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (1):45-67.
    Common sense tells us that in certain circumstances, helping someone is morally obligatory. That intuition appears incompatible with Kant's account of beneficence as a wide imperfect duty, and its implication that agents may exercise latitude over which beneficent actions to perform. In this paper, I offer a resolution to the problem from which it follows that some opportunities to help admit latitude and others do not. I argue that beneficence has two components: the familiar wide duty to help others achieve (...)
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  2. Virtuous Motivation.Karen Stohr - 2018 - In Nancy Snow (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Virtue. New York, NY, USA: pp. 453-469.
    In this paper I describe and defend an account of virtuous motivation that differs from what we might call ordinary moral motivation. It is possible to be morally motivated without being virtuously motivated. In the first half of the essay, I explore different senses of moral motivation and the philosophical puzzles and problems it poses. In the second half, I give an account of virtuous motivation that, unlike ordinary moral motivation, requires the motivational structure characteristic of a fully virtuous person. (...)
     
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  3. On Manners.Karen Stohr - 2011 - Routledge.
    Many otherwise enlightened people often dismiss etiquette as a trivial subject or—worse yet—as nothing but a disguise for moral hypocrisy or unjust social hierarchies. Such sentiments either mistakenly assume that most manners merely frame the “real issues” of any interpersonal exchange or are the ugly vestiges of outdated, unfair social arrangements. But in _On Manners_, Karen Stohr turns the tables on these easy prejudices, demonstrating that the scope of manners is much broader than most people realize and that manners lead (...)
     
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  4.  92
    Moral Cacophony: When Continence is a Virtue.Karen E. Stohr - 2003 - The Journal of Ethics 7 (4):339-363.
    Contemporary virtue ethicists widely accept thethesis that a virtuous agent''s feelings shouldbe in harmony with her judgments about what sheshould do and that she should find virtuousaction easy and pleasant. Conflict between anagent''s feelings and her actions, by contrast,is thought to indicate mere continence – amoral deficiency. This ``harmony thesis'''' isgenerally taken to be a fundamental element ofAristotelian virtue ethics.I argue that the harmony thesis, understoodthis way, is mistaken, because there areoccasions where a virtuous agent will findright action painful and (...)
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  5.  65
    Virtue Ethics and Kant's Cold-Hearted Benefactor.Karen E. Stohr - 2002 - Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (2-3):187-204.
  6. Practical Wisdom and Moral Imagination in Sense and Sensibility.Karen Stohr - 2006 - Philosophy and Literature 30 (2):378-394.
  7.  50
    Recent Work in Virtue Ethics.Karen Stohr & Christopher Wellman - 2002 - American Philosophical Quarterly 39 (1):49-72.
    Given the continued popularity of virtue ethics, it is appropriate to evaluate its impact on normative theory and its ability to fulfill its promise as a new approach to ethics. In this paper, we review three new books by prominent virtue ethicists: Morals from Motives by Michael Slote, On Virtue Ethics by Rosalind Hursthouse, and Natural Goodness by Philippa Foot. We also assess the ability of virtue ethics to respond to three standard objections to the theory. Our conclusion is that (...)
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  8.  32
    Keeping the Shutters Closed: The Moral Value of Reserve.Karen Stohr - 2014 - Philosophers' Imprint 14.
    In this paper I defend a little noted claim of Kant’s — that we should “keep the shutters closed” on our flaws and failings. Kant’s own arguments for this claim aren’t fully satisfactorily, and they rest primarily on pragmatic considerations. My aim in this paper is to provide a more robust Kantian-inspired argument for the moral value of reserve. I argue that collaborating with others to keep the shutters closed on our individual and collective flaws aids in the difficult task (...)
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  9.  66
    Mirrors to One Another: Emotion and Value in Jane Austen and David Hume. [REVIEW]Karen Stohr - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (1):114-117.
  10.  77
    Contemporary Virtue Ethics.Karen Stohr - 2006 - Philosophy Compass 1 (1):22–27.
  11. Aristotelian Friendship and Ignatian Companionship.Karen Stohr - 2017 - In David McPherson (ed.), Spirituality and the Good Life: Philosophical Approaches. Cambridge, UK: pp. 155-176.
    This essay aims to construct a relationship between Aristotle's account of friendship in the Nicomachean Ethics and the ideal of companionship articulated and lived out by St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuit order. Although on the surface, it may seem as though Aristotelian friendship and Ignatian companionship have little in common, given that the accounts were developed in such different contexts, I argue that there are similarities worth exploring. Taken together, the accounts can help illuminate the good (...)
     
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  12. The Etiquette of Eating.Karen Stohr - 2018 - In Tyler Doggett (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Food Ethics. New York: pp. 700-721.
    This article explores and defends the idea that the etiquette conventions governing dinner parties, whether formal or informal, have moral significance. Their significance derives from the way that they foster and facilitate shared moral aims. I draw on literary and philosophical sources to make this claim, beginning with Isak Dineson's short story, Babette's Feast. I employ the concept of ritual from Confucius and Xunzi, as well as Immanuel Kant's detailed discussion of dinner parties in the Anthropology. Kant's account in particular (...)
     
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  13. Teaching & Learning Guide For: Contemporary Virtue Ethics.Karen Stohr - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (1):102-107.
    Virtue ethics is now well established as a substantive, independent normative theory. It was not always so. The revival of virtue ethics was initially spurred by influential criticisms of other normative theories, especially those made by Elizabeth Anscombe, Philippa Foot, John McDowell, Alasdair MacIntyre, and Bernard Williams. 1 Because of this heritage, virtue ethics is often associated with anti-theory movements in ethics and more recently, moral particularism. There are, however, quite a few different approaches to ethics that can reasonably claim (...)
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  14.  37
    Book ReviewsJonathan Jacobs,. Choosing Character: Responsibility for Virtue and Vice.Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2001. Pp. 176. $29.95. [REVIEW]Karen Stohr - 2003 - Ethics 113 (3):702-705.
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  15. Manners, Morals, and Practical Wisdom.Karen Stohr - 2006 - In T. D. J. Chappell (ed.), Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. Oxford University Press.
  16.  93
    Minding Others' Business.Karen Stohr - 2009 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 90 (1):116-139.
    What do we do when a loved one is seriously messing up her life? While Kantianism describes the predicament nicely as a tension between love and respect, it is not well-suited to resolving it. Kantian respect prevents minding another’s business in cases where love demands it. Virtue ethics can readily explain the predicament as a tension between the virtues of sympathy and humility. Moreover, by changing the focus away from the other as a setter of ends and toward the would-be-benefactor’s (...)
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  17.  34
    Why Have Children?: The Ethical Debate by Christine Overall (Review). [REVIEW]Karen Stohr - 2014 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (2):6-10.
    Christine Overall’s book, Why Have Children?: The Ethical Debate, begins with what would seem like an obvious point—that there are better and worse reasons to have a child. Given that that the well-being of a vulnerable and dependent creature hangs on the choice, it surely requires justification. And yet, as she illustrates, philosophers have been comparatively silent about what that justification could or should look like. In this lucid and comprehensive book, Overall sets out to remedy that situation and offer (...)
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  18.  15
    Viewing Manners Through a Wider Lens.Karen Stohr - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (2):273-290.
    I take up reflections on my book, On Manners, by Professors Van Norden, Cline, and Olberding. In response to Professor Van Norden, I further explain and defend my employment of Kant, arguing that Kantianism offers distinctive and valuable resources for thinking about manners. I suggest similarities between Kant and Xunzi 荀子. In response to Professor Cline, I take up the question of the developmental function of manners and explore in further detail the ways in which our social roles both give (...)
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  19.  13
    Kerstein, Samuel. How to Treat Persons.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Pp. 240. $65.00. [REVIEW]Karen Stohr - 2014 - Ethics 124 (3):626-631.
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  20.  17
    Review of Leslie Paul Thiele, The Heart of Judgment: Practical Wisdom, Neuroscience, and Narrative[REVIEW]Karen Stohr - 2007 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (4).
  21. Affective Transformation and the Kantian Moral Outlook : Comments on Susan Stark.Karen Stohr - 2011 - In Adrianne Leigh McEvoy (ed.), Sex, Love, and Friendship: Studies of the Society for the Philosophy of Sex and Love: 1993-2003. Rodopi.
     
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  22.  12
    Minding the Gap: Moral Ideals and Moral Improvement.Karen Stohr - 2019 - New York, NY, USA: Oup Usa.
    The book is an exploration of how we narrow the gap between our moral ideals and our actual selves. It develops an account of moral improvement as a practical project requiring what Karen Stohr calls a "moral neighborhood." Moral neighborhoods are constructed through social practices that instantiate shared moral ideals in a flawed world.
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  23. Pretending Not to Notice: Respect, Attention, and Disability.Karen Stohr - 2018 - In Adam Cureton & Jr Hill (eds.), Disability in Practice: Attitudes, Policies, and Relationships. Oxford, UK: pp. 50-71.
    This paper is about a category of social conventions that, I will argue, have significant moral implications. The category consists in our conventions about what we notice and choose not to notice about persons, features of persons, and their circumstances. We normally do not think much about what we notice about others, and what they notice about us, but I will argue that we should. Noticing people is a way of engaging with them in social contexts. We can engage in (...)
     
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  24. Honors, Awards, and the Catholic Moral Tradition.Karen Stohr - 2010 - Journal of Catholic Legal Studies 49 (2):277-292.
    The paper considers the moral constraints on speaking invitations and honors at Catholic colleges and universities. I argue that the Catholic moral framework does not support the current trend at many Catholic institutions toward restricting speakers to those who accept a narrow range of moral views. I employ standard Catholic philosophical principles, including double effect and cooperation, to defend the claim that Catholic institutions can at least sometimes legitimately bestow honors on pro-choice politicians.
     
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