Results for 'World Medical Association'

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  1.  36
    Decisions Relating to Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Joint Statement From the British Medical Association, the Resuscitation Council (UK) and the Royal College of Nursing.British Medical Association - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (5):310.
    Summary Principles Timely support for patients and people close to them, and effective, sensitive communication are essential. Decisions must be based on the individual patient's circumstances and reviewed regularly. Sensitive advance discussion should always be encouraged, but not forced. Information about CPR and the chances of a successful outcome needs to be realistic. Practical matters Information about CPR policies should be displayed for patients and staff. Leaflets should be available for patients and people close to them explaining about CPR, how (...)
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  2.  17
    Principles of the German Medical Association Concerning Terminal Medical Care.German Medical Association - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (2):254-58.
  3. Declaration of Helsinki. Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects.World Medical Association - 2009 - Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 14 (1):233-238.
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  4.  36
    The Ethics Activities of the World Medical Association.Professor John R. Williams - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (1):7-12.
    Since its formation in 1947, the World Medical Association (WMA) has been a leading voice in international medical ethics. The WMA’s principal ethics activity over the years has been policy development on a wide variety of issues in medical research, medical practice and health care delivery. With the establishment of a dedicated Ethics Unit in 2003, the WMA’s ethics activities have intensified in the areas of liaison, outreach and product development. Initial priorities for the (...)
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  5. Advance Statements About Medical Treatment Code of Practice with Explanatory Notes.Derek British Medical Association & Morgan - 1995
     
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  6.  40
    The Ethics Activities of the World Medical Association.John R. Williams - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (1):7-12.
    Since its formation in 1947, the World Medical Association (WMA) has been a leading voice in international medical ethics. The WMA’s principal ethics activity over the years has been policy development on a wide variety of issues in medical research, medical practice and health care delivery. With the establishment of a dedicated Ethics Unit in 2003, the WMA’s ethics activities have intensified in the areas of liaison, outreach and product development. Initial priorities for the (...)
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  7.  25
    Risk and Trust in Public Health: A Cautionary Tale.Matthew K. Wynia & American Medical Association - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):3 – 6.
    *The views expressed are the author's own. This article should not be construed as representing policies of the American Medical Association.
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  8.  36
    Response to Reviews of the World Medical Association Medical Ethics Manual.J. R. Williams - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (3):164-165.
    There are many challenges to be met when writing an introductory treatise on an academic topic. The subject matter must be presented in a simple but not oversimplified manner. Enough theory must be included to ground the discussion of specific issues but not so much as to overwhelm or bore the readers. The text should be long enough to do justice to the subject matter but short enough to be readily accessible, especially for readers such as healthcare professionals, whose primary (...)
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  9.  12
    Medical Oath: Use and Relevance of the Declaration of Geneva. A Survey of Member Organizations of the World Medical Association.Zoé Rheinsberg, Ramin Parsa-Parsi, Otmar Kloiber & Urban Wiesing - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (2):189-196.
  10.  10
    Research Ethics Revised: The New CIOMS Guidelines and the World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki in Context.Angela Ballantyne & Stefan Eriksson - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (3):310-311.
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  11.  16
    The World Medical Association Launches A Revision of the Declaration of Geneva.Urban Wiesing & Ramin Parsa‐Parsi - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (3):140-140.
  12. World Medical Association, Medical Ethics Manual.P. Momoh - 2006 - In Ian E. Thompson, Kath M. Melia & Kenneth M. Boyd (eds.), Nursing Ethics. Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. pp. 13--6.
     
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  13.  30
    The Law and Ethics of Male Circumcision: Guidance for Doctors.British Medical Association - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (3):259-263.
    1. Aim of the guidelines2. Principles of good practice3. Circumcision for medical purposes4. Non-therapeutic circumcision 4.1. The law 4.1.1. Summary: the law 4.2. Consent and refusal 4.2.1. Children’s own consent 4.2.2. Parents’ consent 4.2.3. Summary: consent and refusal 4.3. Best interests 4.3.1. Summary: best interests 4.4. Health issues 4.5. Standards 4.6. Facilities 4.7. Charging patients 4.8. Conscientious objection5. Useful addresses.
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  14. Whitehead and the Modern World Science, Metaphysics, and Civilization. Three Essays on the Thought of Alfred North Whitehead.Victor Lowe & American Philosophical Association - 1950 - Beacon Press.
     
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  15.  42
    Human Rights From the Nuremberg Doctors Trial to the Geneva Declaration. Persons and Institutions in Medical Ethics and History.Andreas Frewer - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (3):259-268.
    The “Universal Declaration of Human Rights” and the “Geneva Declaration” by the World Medical Association, both in 1948, were preceded by the foundation of the United Nations in New York (1945), the World Medical Association in London (1946) and the World Health Organization in Geneva (1948). After the end of World War II the community of nations strove to achieve and sustain their primary goals of peace and security, as well as their (...)
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  16.  14
    On the Disenchantment of Medicine: Abraham Joshua Heschel’s 1964 Address to the American Medical Association.Alan B. Astrow - 2018 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 39 (6):483-497.
    In 1964, the American Medical Association invited liberal theologian Abraham Joshua Heschel to address its annual meeting in a program entitled “The Patient as a Person” [1]. Unsurprisingly, in light of Heschel’s reputation for outspokenness, he launched a jeremiad against physicians, claiming: “The admiration for medical science is increasing, the respect for its practitioners is decreasing. The depreciation of the image of the doctor is bound to disseminate disenchantment and to affect the state of medicine itself” [1, (...)
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  17.  11
    Placebo: Its Action and Place in Health Research Today. [REVIEW]Dr Randolph Smoak Jr - 2004 - Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (1):9-13.
    The place for the placebo in human clinical research is addressed in this paper. The World Medical Association which is comprised of some 80 National Medical Associations uses much of its resources to address medical ethics and human rights issues. It adopted the Declaration of Helsinki in June 1964 which addressed the protection of individuals in clinical trials. The use of placebos assumes an important role in this document. Five Revisions of the Declaration of Helsinki (...)
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  18.  53
    Conflicts of Interest in Science and Medicine: The Physician’s Perspective.Delon Human - 2002 - Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):273-276.
    The various statements and declarations of the World Medical Association that address conflicts of interest on the part of physicians as (1) researchers, and (2) practitioners, are examined, with particular reference to the October 2000 revision of the Declaration of Helsinki. Recent contributions to the literature, notably on conflicts of interest in medical research, are noted. Finally, key provisions of the American Medical Association’s Code of Medical Ethics (2000–2001 Edition) that address the various (...)
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  19.  41
    Extracts From the New Zealand Minister of Health's Speech to the New Zealand Medical Association Conference. 19 April 1994.Jenny Shipley - 1995 - Health Care Analysis 3 (2):116-118.
    I said at the beginning that some quantum leaps in our thinking would be required as we face up to the challenges and changes that health care delivery will and must undergo.It is not a matter of politics, it is a matter of pragmatism.It is a matter of reality and it's a matter of simply having to face up to what, may I say, has been glaringly obious for some time.I know that doctors come with a strong ethos in terms (...)
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  20.  16
    Steve Biko, Medical Student Leader of the South African “Black Con-Sciousness Movement,” Was Arrested on August 6, 1977, and Died on September 11 as a Result of Police Beatings. Biko Was Seen by Two Dis-Trict Surgeons Who Were Later Accused of Failing to Render Adequate Atten-Tion. At the Time These Doctors Were Defended by the Medical Association of South Africa and the South African Medical and Dental Council. One of the Two Continued to Practice as a District Surgeon in the Port Eliza-Beth Region ... [REVIEW]Wendy Orr - 2008 - In Neil Arya & Joanna Santa Barbara (eds.), Peace Through Health: How Health Professionals Can Work for a Less Violent World. Kumarian Press. pp. 1111.
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  21.  22
    The Art of Perception: From the Life World to the Medical Gaze and Back Again.Christian Hick - 1999 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (2):129-140.
    Perceptions are often merely regarded as the basic elements of knowledge. They have, however, a complex structure of their own and are far from being elementary. My paper will analyze two basic patterns of perception and some of the resulting medical implications. Most basically, all object perception is characterized by a mixture of knowledge and ignorance (Husserl). Perception essentially perceives with inner and outer horizons, brought about by the kinesthetic activity of the perceiving subject (Sartre). This first layer of (...)
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  22.  5
    Illegitimate Authorship and Flawed Procedures: Fundamental, Formal Criticisms of the Declaration of Helsinki.Hans‐Joerg Ehni & Urban Wiesing - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (3):319-325.
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  23.  21
    Palliative Sedation: Not Just Normal Medical Practice. Ethical Reflections on the Royal Dutch Medical Association's Guideline on Palliative Sedation.R. Janssens, J. J. M. van Delden & G. A. M. Widdershoven - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (11):664-668.
    The main premise of the Royal Dutch Medical Association's (RDMA) guideline on palliative sedation is that palliative sedation, contrary to euthanasia, is normal medical practice. Although we do not deny the ethical distinctions between euthanasia and palliative sedation, we will critically analyse the guideline's argumentation strategy with which euthanasia is demarcated from palliative sedation. First, we will analyse the guideline's main premise, which entails that palliative sedation is normal medical treatment. After this, we will critically discuss (...)
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  24.  45
    The Medical Profession and Human Rights: Handbook for a Changing Agenda: British Medical Association. Zed Books, 2001, Pound50.00 (Hb), Pound18.95 (Pb), Pp 561. ISBN 1 85649 611. [REVIEW]D. Dickenson - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (5):332-332.
    Review of British Medical Association handbook on human rights and doctors.
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  25.  39
    Physicians' Intent to Comply with the American Medical Association's Guidelines on Gifts From the Pharmaceutical Industry.S. L. Pinto, E. Lipowski, R. Segal, C. Kimberlin & J. Algina - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (6):313-319.
    Objective: To identify factors that predict physicians’ intent to comply with the American Medical Association’s ethical guidelines on gifts from the pharmaceutical industry.Methods: A survey was designed and mailed in June 2004 to a random sample of 850 physicians in Florida, USA, excluding physicians with inactive licences, incomplete addresses, addresses in other states and pretest participants. Factor analysis extracted six factors: attitude towards following the guidelines, subjective norms , facilitating conditions , profession-specific precedents , individual-specific precedents and intent. (...)
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  26.  49
    The Discrepancy Between the Legal Definition of Capacity and the British Medical Association's Guidelines.J. O. A. Tan - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (5):427-429.
    Differences in guidance from various organisations is preventing uniform standards of practiceThe emphasis in medical law and ethics on protecting the patient’s right to choose is at an all time high. Apart from circumscribed situations, for instance where the Mental Health Act 19831 is applicable, the only justification for medically treating an adult patient against his or her wishes is on the basis of common law, using the principle of best interests, and only when he or she lacks capacity (...)
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  27.  35
    Assault on Editorial Independence: Improprieties of the Canadian Medical Association.J. P. Kassirer - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (2):63-66.
    The violation of editorial independence by the CMA seriously damaged trust in CMAJ and raises questions whether the CMA can operate a truly independent journalOn February 20, 2006, John Hoey and Anne Marie Todkill, the two most senior editors of the Canadian Medical Association Journal were fired by the journal’s publisher, Graham Morris. At first, CMA spokespersons said that the firing had been planned for some time based on a desire to “refresh” the journal. Later they refused to (...)
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  28.  20
    Thick as Thieves the Norwegian Medical Association Attempts to Stifle Ethical Debate.S. Holm - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (1):1-1.
    In January 2006, one of the major cases of scientific fraud in recent years broke in the media. It was discovered that the Norwegian researcher John Sudbø had falsified the complete set of data on which an article published in the Lancet in 2005 had been based.1 The article had 14 authors, and Professor Jan Helge Solbakk, Professor of Medical Ethics at the University of Oslo, was quoted in Norwegian media as saying that “… also the 13 other co-authors (...)
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  29.  49
    Snyder V. American Association of Blood Banks: A Re‐Examination of Liability for Medical Practice Guideline Promulgators.Alice Noble, Troyen A. Brennan & Andrew L. Hyams - 1998 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 4 (1):49-62.
  30.  55
    The Medical Ethics Committee of the British Medical Association - Principles and Pragmatism.J. Sheather - 2008 - Clinical Ethics 3 (2):91-94.
    This article gives an overview of the development, remit, structure and working of the British Medical Association's Medical Ethics Committee. It situates it within a brief history of the Association and gives examples of current work.
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  31.  24
    The American Medical Association.John Hart - 2014 - Catholic Social Science Review 19:287-294.
    At one time, the American Medical Association had a strong pro-life position regarding unborn human beings. Using an online AMA archives database, this research note contrasts early AMA pro-life commentary with its eventual pro-choice position. Strong pro-life advocacy in the mid-to-late 1800s, led by doctors such as Horatio Storer, gave way in the 1900s to a waning of pro-life zeal, and eventually developed into a pro-choice stance on abortion.
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  32.  11
    From an Exercise in Professional Etiquette to Society's Wish List? Review of American Medical Association, Code of Medical Ethics: Current Opinions with Annotations.Tom Meulenbergs - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (2):69-70.
    (2004). From an Exercise in Professional Etiquette to Society's Wish List? Review of American Medical Association, Code of Medical Ethics: Current Opinions with Annotations. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 4, No. 2, pp. 69-70. doi: 10.1162/152651604323097907.
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  33. The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics.Robert B. Baker & Laurence B. McCullough (eds.) - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics is the first comprehensive scholarly account of the global history of medical ethics. Offering original interpretations of the field by leading bioethicists and historians of medicine, it will serve as the essential point of departure for future scholarship in the field. The volumes reconceptualize the history of medical ethics through the creation of new categories, including the life cycle; discourses of religion, philosophy, and bioethics; and the relationship between (...) ethics and the state, which includes a historical reexamination of the ethics of apartheid, colonialism, communism, health policy, imperialism, militarism, Nazi medicine, Nazi "medical ethics," and research ethics. Also included are the first global chronology of persons and texts; the first concise biographies of major figures in medical ethics; and the first comprehensive bibliography of the history of medical ethics. An extensive index guides readers to topics, texts, and proper names. (shrink)
     
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  34.  84
    Should Trainee Doctors Use the Developing World to Gain Clinical Experience? The Annual Varsity Medical Debate ¿ London, Friday 20th January, 2012.Barnabas Gilbert, Calum Miller, Fenella Corrick & Robert Watson - 2013 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8:1-4.
    The 2012 Varsity Medical Debate between Oxford University and Cambridge University provided a stage for representatives from these famous institutions to debate the motion “This house believes that trainee doctors should be able to use the developing world to gain clinical experience.” This article brings together many of the arguments put forward during the debate, centring around three major points of contention: the potential intrinsic wrong of ‘using’ patients in developing countries; the effects on the elective participant; and (...)
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  35.  73
    Medical Professionalism, Revenue Enhancement, and Self-Interest: An Ethically Ambiguous Association[REVIEW]Jan C. Heller - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (4):307-315.
    This article explores the association between medical professionalism, revenue enhancement, and self-interest. Utilizing the sociological literature, I begin by characterizing professionalism generally and medical professionalism particularly. I then consider “pay for performance” mechanisms as an example of one way physicians might be incentivized to improve their professionalism and, at the same time, enhance their revenue. I suggest that the concern discussed in much of the medical professionalism literature that physicians might act on the basis of self-interest (...)
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  36.  14
    The Relation Between Medical Education and the Medical Profession's World View.Walter Burger - 2001 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (1):79-84.
    Thinking in medicine is still dominated by the cartesian view of science of the past centuries, dividing individuals into the reasoning mind (res cogitans) and an objective body as part of all non-subjective things of the world (res extensa). This classical scientific paradigm does not take into account the influence the observer exerts on the observed phenomena. Applying this paradigm to medical research and education has consequences regarding the relationship between physicians and patients as well as between (...) teachers and their students. An improvement of medical education towards a broader understanding of complex illnesses with their psycho-social implications must be based on philosophical and epistemological issues. The requirements of modern medicine cannot just be met by adding more psycho-social content to somatic medical education or by changing the didactic approach without reflection on the underlying concepts and the relation of the human being to his world. (shrink)
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  37.  46
    Canadian Medical Association's Ethics Activities.John R. Williams - 2004 - HEC Forum 16 (2):138-151.
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  38.  13
    Medical Migration and World Health.A. G. Fraser - 1977 - Journal of Medical Ethics 3 (4):179-182.
    Everyone knows that British doctors are emigrating and that other doctors, mostly from the third world, are immigrating to Britain. Also everyone thinks that he knows the reasons why. However, the Edinburgh Medical Group thought the various reasons for this medical migration should be examined more closely, and held a symposium (Chairman, Professor A S Duncan, Professor Emeritus of Medical Education in the University of Edinburgh) to examine the causes for medical migration at the present (...)
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  39.  39
    Misconduct in Medical Students.Jaime Vengoechea, Socorro Moreno & Alvaro Ruiz - 2008 - Developing World Bioethics 8 (3):219-225.
    We developed a survey to explore the association between misconduct and stress, potential stressors and other possible contributing f.
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  40.  44
    The Pitfalls of Deducing Ethics From Behavioral Economics: Why the Association of American Medical Colleges Is Wrong About Pharmaceutical Detailing.Thomas S. Huddle - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (1):1-8.
    The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) is urging academic medical centers to ban pharmaceutical detailing. This policy followed from a consideration of behavioral and neuroeconomics research. I argue that this research did not warrant the conclusions drawn from it. Pharmaceutical detailing carries risks of cognitive error for physicians, as do other forms of information exchange. Physicians may overcome such risks; those determined to do so may ethically engage in pharmaceutical detailing. Whether or not they should do (...)
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  41.  41
    The Position of the Chilean Medical Association with Respect to Torture as an Instrument of Political Repression.G. Seelmann - 1991 - Journal of Medical Ethics 17 (Suppl):33-34.
  42.  25
    Current Opinions of the Judicial Council of the American Medical Association.G. R. Dunstan - 1982 - Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (2):102-102.
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  43.  26
    Current Opinions of the Judicial Council of the American Medical Association.D. Lamb - 1986 - Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (1):52-52.
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  44. The Position of the Chilean Medical Association with Respect to Torture as an Instrument of Political Repression.Seelmann Gunther - 1991 - Journal of Medical Ethics 17.
     
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  45.  36
    Illness as Unhomelike Being-in-the-World? Phenomenology and Medical Practice.Rolf Ahlzén - 2011 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (3):323-331.
    Scientific medicine has been successful by ways of an ever more detailed understanding and mastering of bodily functions and dysfunctions. Biomedical research promises new triumphs, but discontent with medical practice is all around. Since several decades this has been acknowledged and discussed. The philosophical traditions of phenomenology and hermeneutics have been proposed as promising ways to approach medical practice, by ways of a richer understanding of the meaning structures of health and illness. In 2000, Swedish philosopher Fredrik Svenaeus (...)
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  46. Moral Luck in Medical Ethics and Practical Politics.Donna Dickenson - 1989 - Dissertation, Open University (United Kingdom)
    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. ;Typically we maintain two incompatible standards towards right action and good character, and the tension between these polarities creates the paradox of moral luck. In practice we regard actions as right or wrong, and character as good or bad, partly according to what happens as a result of the agent's decision. Yet we also think that people should not be held responsible for matters beyond their control. ;This split underpins Kant's (...)
     
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  47.  20
    Medicine in a Neurocentric World: About the Explanatory Power of Neuroscientific Models in Medical Research and Practice. [REVIEW]Lara Huber & Lara K. Kutschenko - 2009 - Medicine Studies 1 (4):307-313.
    Medicine in a Neurocentric World: About the Explanatory Power of Neuroscientific Models in Medical Research and Practice Content Type Journal Article Category Editorial Notes Pages 307-313 DOI 10.1007/s12376-009-0036-2 Authors Lara Huber, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz Institute for History, Philosophy and Ethics of Medicine Am Pulverturm 13 55131 Mainz Germany Lara K. Kutschenko, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz Institute for History, Philosophy and Ethics of Medicine Am Pulverturm 13 (...)
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  48.  54
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “The Pitfalls of Deducing Ethics From Economics: Why the Association of American Medical Colleges is Wrong About Pharmaceutical Detailing”.Thomas S. Huddle - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (1):1-3.
    (2010). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “The Pitfalls of Deducing Ethics from Economics: Why the Association of American Medical Colleges is Wrong About Pharmaceutical Detailing”. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 10, No. 1, pp. W1-W3.
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  49.  25
    The Nazi Doctors and the Medical Community; Honor or Censure? The Case of Hans Sewering.Lawrence W. White - 1996 - Journal of Medical Humanities 17 (2):119-135.
    During the Nazi era, most German physicians abrogated their responsibilities to individual patients, and instead chose to advocate the interests of an evil regime. In so doing, several fundamental bioethical principles were violated. Despite gross violations of individual rights, many physicians went on to have successful careers, and in many cases were honored. This paper will review the case of Hans Sewering, a participant in the Nazi euthanasia program who became the President-elect of the World Medical Association. (...)
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  50.  50
    Should Patents for Antiretrovirals Be Waived in the Developing World? Annual Varsity Medical Debate - London, 21 January 2011.Fenella Corrick, Robert Watson & Sanjay Budhdeo - 2011 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 6:1-6.
    The 2011 Varsity Medical Debate, between Oxford and Cambridge Universities, brought students and faculty together to discuss the waiving of patents for antiretroviral therapies in the developing world. With an estimated 29.5 million infected by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in low- and middle-income countries and only 5.3 million of those being treated, the effective and equitable distribution of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) is an issue of great importance. The debate centred around three areas of contention. Firstly, there was disagreement (...)
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