Results for 'World Medical Association'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Declaration of Helsinki. Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects.World Medical Association - 2009 - Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 14 (1):233-238.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   276 citations  
  2.  22
    The World Medical Association Launches A Revision of the Declaration of Geneva.Urban Wiesing & Ramin Parsa-Parsi - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (3):140-140.
  3. World Medical Association, Medical Ethics Manual.P. Momoh - 2006 - In Ian E. Thompson, Kath M. Melia & Kenneth M. Boyd (eds.), Nursing Ethics. Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. pp. 13--6.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  15
    Medical Oath: Use and Relevance of the Declaration of Geneva. A Survey of Member Organizations of the World Medical Association.Zoé Rheinsberg, Ramin Parsa-Parsi, Otmar Kloiber & Urban Wiesing - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (2):189-196.
    The Declaration of Geneva is one of the core documents of medical ethics. A revision process was started by the World Medical Association in 2016. The WMA has also used this occasion to examine how the Declaration of Geneva is used in countries throughout the world by conducting a survey of all WMA constituent members. The findings are highly important and raise urgent questions for the World Medical Association and its National (...) Associations : The Declaration of Geneva is only rarely used as an oath text despite the fact that physicians’ oaths are generally widespread. This is not consistent with the intention and claim of the Declaration of Geneva. The article then discusses three questions. Should there be one single binding oath? Which organization should be responsible for such an oath? Which oath is the most obvious candidate? In a globalized world and despite all cultural diversity, the medical profession should have one core moral basis which is binding for physicians all over the world. The most obvious candidate for an oath incorporating this moral basis is the Declaration of Geneva. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5.  46
    The Ethics Activities of the World Medical Association.Professor John R. Williams - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (1):7-12.
    Since its formation in 1947, the World Medical Association (WMA) has been a leading voice in international medical ethics. The WMA’s principal ethics activity over the years has been policy development on a wide variety of issues in medical research, medical practice and health care delivery. With the establishment of a dedicated Ethics Unit in 2003, the WMA’s ethics activities have intensified in the areas of liaison, outreach and product development. Initial priorities for the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  42
    The Ethics Activities of the World Medical Association.John R. Williams - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (1):7-12.
    Since its formation in 1947, the World Medical Association (WMA) has been a leading voice in international medical ethics. The WMA’s principal ethics activity over the years has been policy development on a wide variety of issues in medical research, medical practice and health care delivery. With the establishment of a dedicated Ethics Unit in 2003, the WMA’s ethics activities have intensified in the areas of liaison, outreach and product development. Initial priorities for the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  15
    Research Ethics Revised: The New CIOMS Guidelines and the World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki in Context.Angela Ballantyne & Stefan Eriksson - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (3):310-311.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  36
    Response to Reviews of the World Medical Association Medical Ethics Manual.J. R. Williams - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (3):164-165.
    There are many challenges to be met when writing an introductory treatise on an academic topic. The subject matter must be presented in a simple but not oversimplified manner. Enough theory must be included to ground the discussion of specific issues but not so much as to overwhelm or bore the readers. The text should be long enough to do justice to the subject matter but short enough to be readily accessible, especially for readers such as healthcare professionals, whose primary (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  27
    On the Disenchantment of Medicine: Abraham Joshua Heschel’s 1964 Address to the American Medical Association.Alan Astrow - 2018 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 39 (6):483-497.
    In 1964, the American Medical Association invited liberal theologian Abraham Joshua Heschel to address its annual meeting in a program entitled “The Patient as a Person” [1]. Unsurprisingly, in light of Heschel’s reputation for outspokenness, he launched a jeremiad against physicians, claiming: “The admiration for medical science is increasing, the respect for its practitioners is decreasing. The depreciation of the image of the doctor is bound to disseminate disenchantment and to affect the state of medicine itself” [1, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  42
    Extracts From the New Zealand Minister of Health's Speech to the New Zealand Medical Association Conference. 19 April 1994.Jenny Shipley - 1995 - Health Care Analysis 3 (2):116-118.
    I said at the beginning that some quantum leaps in our thinking would be required as we face up to the challenges and changes that health care delivery will and must undergo.It is not a matter of politics, it is a matter of pragmatism.It is a matter of reality and it's a matter of simply having to face up to what, may I say, has been glaringly obious for some time.I know that doctors come with a strong ethos in terms (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11.  19
    Steve Biko, Medical Student Leader of the South African “Black Con-Sciousness Movement,” Was Arrested on August 6, 1977, and Died on September 11 as a Result of Police Beatings. Biko Was Seen by Two Dis-Trict Surgeons Who Were Later Accused of Failing to Render Adequate Atten-Tion. At the Time These Doctors Were Defended by the Medical Association of South Africa and the South African Medical and Dental Council. One of the Two Continued to Practice as a District Surgeon in the Port Eliza-Beth Region ... [REVIEW]Wendy Orr - 2008 - In Neil Arya & Joanna Santa Barbara (eds.), Peace Through Health: How Health Professionals Can Work for a Less Violent World. Kumarian Press. pp. 1111.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  58
    Human Rights From the Nuremberg Doctors Trial to the Geneva Declaration. Persons and Institutions in Medical Ethics and History.Andreas Frewer - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (3):259-268.
    The “Universal Declaration of Human Rights” and the “Geneva Declaration” by the World Medical Association, both in 1948, were preceded by the foundation of the United Nations in New York (1945), the World Medical Association in London (1946) and the World Health Organization in Geneva (1948). After the end of World War II the community of nations strove to achieve and sustain their primary goals of peace and security, as well as their (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  80
    Medicalizing Mental Health: A Phenomenological Alternative. [REVIEW]Kevin Aho - 2008 - Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (4):243-259.
    With the increasingly close relationship between the pharmaceutical industry and the American Psychiatric Association (APA) there has been a growing tendency in the mental health professions to interpret everyday emotional suffering and behavior as a medical condition that can be treated with a particular drug. In this paper, I suggest that hermeneutic phenomenology is uniquely suited to challenge the core assumptions of medicalization by expanding psychiatry's narrow conception of the self as an enclosed, biological individual and recognizing the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  14.  14
    Medical Practice: Defendants and Prisoners.P. Bowden - 1976 - Journal of Medical Ethics 2 (4):163-172.
    It is argued in this paper that a doctor cannot serve two masters. The work of the prison medical officer is examined and it is shown that his dual allegiance to the state and to those individuals who are under his care results in activities which largely favour the former. The World Health Organisation prescribes a system of health ethics which indicates, in qualitative terms, the responsibility of each state for health provisions. In contrast, the World (...) Association acts as both promulgator and guardian of a code of medical ethics which determines the responsibilities of the doctor to his patient. In the historical sense medical practitioners have always emphasized the sanctity of the relationship with their patients and the doctor's role as an expert witness is shown to have centered around this bond. The development of medical services in prisons has focused more on the partnership between doctor and institution. Imprisonment in itself could be seen as prejudicial to health as are disciplinary methods which are more obviously detrimental. The involvement of medical practitioners in such procedures is discussed in the light of their role as the prisoner's personal physician. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Do Medical Schools Teach Medical Humanities? Review of Curricula in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom.Jeremy Howick, Lunan Zhao, Brenna McKaig, Alessandro Rosa, Raffaella Campaner, Jason Oke & Dien Ho - 2021 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice (1):86-92.
    Rationale and objectives: Medical humanities are becoming increasingly recognized as positively impacting medical education and medical practice. However, the extent of medical humanities teaching in medical schools is largely unknown. We reviewed medical school curricula in Canada, the UK and the US. We also explored the relationship between medical school ranking and the inclusion of medical humanities in the curricula. -/- Methods: We searched the curriculum websites of all accredited medical schools (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  25
    Euthanasia in The Netherlands: The Role of the Dutch Medical Profession.R. J. M. Dillmann - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (1):100.
    Is it remarkable that the Royal Dutch Medical Association as a medical professional organization has the point of view that in particular circumstances euthanasia is an acceptable act for a physician. Seen from the viewpoints in the international community, we might say that it is highly remarkable. Frankly put: the RDMA has met strong international disapproval of its standpoint on euthanasia during the last 10 years or so. For instance, the World Medical Association still (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  17.  7
    War of Conscience: Antivaccination and the Battle for Medical Freedom During World War I.Susan McPherson - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2020-012069.
    The nineteenth century British antivaccination movement attracted popular and parliamentary support and ultimately saw the 1853 law which had made smallpox vaccination compulsory nullified by the 1898 ‘conscientious objector’ clause. In keeping with popular public health discourse of the time, the movement had employed rhetoric associated with sanitary science and liberalism. In the early twentieth century new discoveries in bacteriology were fuelling advances in vaccination and the medical establishment was increasingly pushing for public health to move towards more interventionist (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  8
    The WMA on Medical Ethics--Some Critical Comments.S. Holm - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (3):161-162.
    Because the WMA’s new manual contains a partially partisan view of what constitutes medical ethics, if used for teaching it needs to be balanced by other materialsThe recent publication of the World Medical Association’s Medical Ethics Manual should be welcomed since it gives people all over the world, or at least those people who are on the internet and who have a reasonable printer, access to an introduction to medical ethics that can be (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  21
    Social Health Disparities in Clinical Care: A New Approach to Medical Fairness.Klaus Puschel, Enrico Furlan & Wim Dekkers - 2015 - Public Health Ethics:phv034.
    Social health disparities are increasing in most countries around the world. During the past two decades, a large amount of evidence has emerged about the health consequences of social inequalities. Despite such evidence, the concept of medical fairness, as traditionally defined by the World Medical Association, has remained unchallenged and even reinforced by some scholars who emphasize that doctors should remain neutral to the socioeconomic status of their patients when providing clinical care. The inconsistency between (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. Moral Luck in Medical Ethics and Practical Politics.Donna Dickenson - 1989 - Dissertation, Open University (United Kingdom)
    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. ;Typically we maintain two incompatible standards towards right action and good character, and the tension between these polarities creates the paradox of moral luck. In practice we regard actions as right or wrong, and character as good or bad, partly according to what happens as a result of the agent's decision. Yet we also think that people should not be held responsible for matters beyond their control. ;This split underpins Kant's (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  21.  1
    Is the International Regulation of Medical Complicity with Torture Largely Window Dressing? The Case of Israel and the Lessons of a 12-Year Medical Ethical Appeal.Derek Summerfield - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):367-370.
    This is the account of an ongoing appeal initiated in 2009 by 725 doctors from 43 countries concerning medical complicity with torture in Israel. It has been underpinned by a voluminous and still accumulating evidence base from reputable international and regional human rights organisations, quoted below, and has spanned the terms of office of four World Medical Association presidencies and two UN special rapporteurs on torture. This campaign has been a litmus test of whether international (...) codes regarding doctors and torture actually matter, and are applied rigorously and even-handededly, particularly when compelling evidence incriminates a WMA member association. Our findings in the case of Israel suggest that this is not true, and that impunity largely operates. The WMA seems in partisan violation of its mandate to be the official international watchdog on the ethical behaviour of doctors. And as the IMA case demonstrates, by their inaction national medical associations or other regulatory bodies appear to function at base as buttresses and shields of the state. All data relevant to the study are included in the article. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  28
    When Doctoring is Not About Doctoring: An Ethical Analysis of Practices Associated with Canadian Immigration HIV Testing.Laura Bisaillon & Carolyn Ells - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (3):287-297.
    Immigration medicine and the work carried out by Panel Physicians within the Canadian immigration system give rise to ethically troublesome practices and consequences. In this analysis in three parts, we explore the context of the immigration medical examination, characterize the observed and potential burdens and harms for immigrant and refugee applicants with HIV, and critically assess the possibilities for transforming immigration medical practices and policy to reduce inequities. We use the Code of Ethics of the Canadian Medical (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  13
    Chasing Medical Miracles: The Promise and Perils of Clinical Trials.Alex O'Meara - 2009 - Walker & Co..
    Journalist Alex O’Meara is one of the more than twenty million Americans enrolled in a clinical trial—three times as many people as a decade ago. Indeed, clinical trials have become a $24 billion industry that is reshaping every aspect of health-care development and delivery in the United States and around the world. As O’Meara chronicles, twentieth-century medical trials have led to epic advances in health care, from asthma inhalers and insulin pumps to heart valves and pacemakers. And yet, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  29
    The Nazi Doctors and the Medical Community; Honor or Censure? The Case of Hans Sewering.Lawrence W. White - 1996 - Journal of Medical Humanities 17 (2):119-135.
    During the Nazi era, most German physicians abrogated their responsibilities to individual patients, and instead chose to advocate the interests of an evil regime. In so doing, several fundamental bioethical principles were violated. Despite gross violations of individual rights, many physicians went on to have successful careers, and in many cases were honored. This paper will review the case of Hans Sewering, a participant in the Nazi euthanasia program who became the President-elect of the World Medical Association. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  13
    Judging the Scientific and Medical Literature: Some Legal Implications of Changes to Biomedical Research and Publication.Gary Edmond - 2008 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 28 (3):523-561.
    Over the last two decades judges (and regulators) in all common law jurisdictions have increased their reliance on published medical and scientific literature. During the same period biomedical research has undergone fundamental and unprecedented change. This article explores some of the changes to the location, organization and funding of biomedical research in order to assess their implications for liability and proof. Focusing on peer review and publication, along with reforms promoted by the editors of some of the world's (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  14
    Placebo: Its Action and Place in Health Research Today. [REVIEW]Dr Randolph Smoak Jr - 2004 - Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (1):9-13.
    The place for the placebo in human clinical research is addressed in this paper. The World Medical Association which is comprised of some 80 National Medical Associations uses much of its resources to address medical ethics and human rights issues. It adopted the Declaration of Helsinki in June 1964 which addressed the protection of individuals in clinical trials. The use of placebos assumes an important role in this document. Five Revisions of the Declaration of Helsinki (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27.  51
    Misconduct in Medical Students.Jaime Vengoechea, Socorro Moreno & Alvaro Ruiz - 2008 - Developing World Bioethics 8 (3):219-225.
    We developed a survey to explore the association between misconduct and stress, potential stressors and other possible contributing f.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28.  20
    Bioethics Down Under--Medical Ethics Engages with Political Philosophy.S. Holm - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (1):1-1.
    Philosophers should be wary of using the methods they use in philosophy when engaging in discussions about policy makingThe beginning of November last year was a busy time in the bioethics calendar with four conferences taking place in New Zealand and Australia. The Fifth International Conference on Priorities in Health Care took place in Wellington; the Fifth Feminist Approaches to Bioethics congress, the Seventh World Congress of Bioethics, and the meeting of the Australasian Bioethics Association were all in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  29. Job Burnout Is Associated With Prehospital Decision Delay: An Internet-Based Survey in China.Han Yin, Cheng Jiang, Xiaohe Shi, Yilin Chen, Xueju Yu, Yu Wang, Weiya Li, Huan Ma & Qingshan Geng - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    BackgroundPrehospital delay is associated with non-modifiable factors such as age, residential region, and disease severity. However, the impact of psychosocial factors especially for job burnout on prehospital decision delay is still little understood.MethodThis internet-based survey was conducted between 14 February 2021 and 5 March 2021 in China through the Wechat platform and web page. Self-designed questionnaires about the expected and actual length of prehospital decision time and the Chinese version of Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, Type D Personality Scale-14, and Social (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  74
    The World is One Great Hospital.David-Olivier Gougelet - 2010 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 18 (1):43-66.
    This article attempts to locate the origin of Foucault’s work on biopolitics and biopower in his writings on medicine and medicalization. Though the concept of biopower is most closely associated with Foucault’ genealogy of the dispositif of sexuality, this essay sets aside the question of sexuality and examines more closely the archeology and genealogy of the medical dispositif to which Foucault dedicated a significant portion of his work throughout the 60’s and 70’s, in order to locate therein the lineage (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. The Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the World.Elaine Scarry - 1985 - Oxford University Press.
    Part philosophical meditation, part cultural critique, The Body in Pain is a profoundly original study that has already stirred excitement in a wide range of intellectual circles. The book is an analysis of physical suffering and its relation to the numerous vacabularies and cultural forces--literary, political, philosophical, medical, religious--that confront it. Elaine Scarry bases her study on a wide range of sources: literature and art, medical case histories, documents on torture compiled by Amnesty International, legal transcripts of personal (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   226 citations  
  32.  65
    Conflicts of Interest in Science and Medicine: The Physician’s Perspective.Delon Human - 2002 - Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):273-276.
    The various statements and declarations of the World Medical Association that address conflicts of interest on the part of physicians as (1) researchers, and (2) practitioners, are examined, with particular reference to the October 2000 revision of the Declaration of Helsinki. Recent contributions to the literature, notably on conflicts of interest in medical research, are noted. Finally, key provisions of the American Medical Association’s Code of Medical Ethics (2000–2001 Edition) that address the various (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  3
    Raising the Profile of Fairness and Justice in Medical Practice and Policy.Raanan Gillon - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (12):789-790.
    Justice, one of the four Beauchamp and Childress prima facie basic principles of biomedical ethics, is explored in two excellent papers in the current issue of the journal. The papers stem from a British Medical Association essay competition on justice and fairness in medical practice and policy. Although the competition was open to all comers, of the 235 entries both the winning paper by Alistair Wardrope1 and the highly commended runner-up by Zoe Fritz and Caitríona Cox2 were (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  22
    Principles of the German Medical Association Concerning Terminal Medical Care.German Medical Association - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (2):254-58.
  35.  31
    The Standard of Care Debate: The Declaration of Helsinki Versus the International Consensus Opinion.R. K. Lie - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (2):190-193.
    The World Medical Association’s revised Declaration of Helsinki endorses the view that all trial participants in every country are entitled to the worldwide best standard of care. In this paper the authors show that this requirement has been rejected by every national and international committee that has examined this issue. They argue that the consensus view now holds that it is ethically permissible, in some circumstances, to provide research participants less than the worldwide best care. Finally, the (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  36.  64
    Decisions Relating to Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Joint Statement From the British Medical Association, the Resuscitation Council (UK) and the Royal College of Nursing.British Medical Association - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (5):310.
    Summary Principles Timely support for patients and people close to them, and effective, sensitive communication are essential. Decisions must be based on the individual patient's circumstances and reviewed regularly. Sensitive advance discussion should always be encouraged, but not forced. Information about CPR and the chances of a successful outcome needs to be realistic. Practical matters Information about CPR policies should be displayed for patients and staff. Leaflets should be available for patients and people close to them explaining about CPR, how (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  37.  21
    Dilemmas of Medical Ethics in the Canadian Penitentiary Service.C. Roy - 1976 - Journal of Medical Ethics 2 (4):180-184.
    There is a unique hospital in Canada-and perhaps in the world-because it is built outside prison walls and it exists specifically for the psychiatric treatment of prisoners. It is on the one hand a hospital and on the other a prison. Moreover it has to provide the same quality and standard of care which is expected of a hospital associated with a university. From the time the hospital was established moral dilemmas appeared which were concerned with conflicts between the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  15
    Commercial Pressures on Professionalism in American Medical Care: From Medicare to the Affordable Care Act.Theodore R. Marmor & Robert W. Gordon - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (4):412-419.
    This essay describes how longstanding conceptions of professionalism in American medical care came under attack in the decades since the enactment of Medicare in 1965 and how the reform strategy and core provisions of the 2010 Affordable Care Act illustrate the weakening of those ideas and the institutional practices embodying them.The opening identifies the dominant role of physicians in American medical care in the two decades after World War II. By the time Medicare was enacted in 1965, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  39.  26
    On Euthanasia: Exploring Psychological Meaning and Attitudes in a Sample of Mexican Physicians and Medical Students.Asunción Álvarez Del Río & Ma Luisa Marván - 2011 - Developing World Bioethics 11 (3):146-153.
    Euthanasia has become the subject of ethical and political debate in many countries including Mexico. Since many physicians are deeply concerned about euthanasia, due to their crucial participation in its decision and implementation, it is important to know the psychological meaning that the term ‘euthanasia’ has for them, as well as their attitudes toward this practice. This study explores psychological meaning and attitudes toward euthanasia in 546 Mexican subjects, either medical students or physicians, who were divided into three groups: (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40.  21
    The 2008 Declaration of Helsinki — First Among Equals in Research Ethics?Annette Rid & Harald Schmidt - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (1):143-148.
    The World Medical Association's Declaration of Helsinki is one of the most important and influential international research ethics documents. Launched in 1964, when ethical guidance for research was scarce, the Declaration comprised eleven basic principles and provisions on clinical research. The document has since evolved to a complex set of principles, norms, and directions for action of varying degrees of specificity, ranging from specific rules to broad aspirational statements. It has been revised six times in an effort (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  41.  45
    Proceedings of the 4th World Conference on Research Integrity: Brazil, Rio de Janeiro. 31 May - 3 June 2015.Lex Bouter, Melissa S. Anderson, Ana Marusic, Sabine Kleinert, Susan Zimmerman, Paulo S. L. Beirão, Laura Beranzoli, Giuseppe Di Capua, Silvia Peppoloni, Maria Betânia de Freitas Marques, Adriana Sousa, Claudia Rech, Torunn Ellefsen, Adele Flakke Johannessen, Jacob Holen, Raymond Tait, Jillon Van der Wall, John Chibnall, James M. DuBois, Farida Lada, Jigisha Patel, Stephanie Harriman, Leila Posenato Garcia, Adriana Nascimento Sousa, Cláudia Maria Correia Borges Rech, Oliveira Patrocínio, Raphaela Dias Fernandes, Laressa Lima Amâncio, Anja Gillis, David Gallacher, David Malwitz, Tom Lavrijssen, Mariusz Lubomirski, Malini Dasgupta, Katie Speanburg, Elizabeth C. Moylan, Maria K. Kowalczuk, Nikolas Offenhauser, Markus Feufel, Niklas Keller, Volker Bähr, Diego Oliveira Guedes, Douglas Leonardo Gomes Filho, Vincent Larivière, Rodrigo Costas, Daniele Fanelli, Mark William Neff, Aline Carolina de Oliveira Machado Prata, Limbanazo Matandika, Sonia Maria Ramos de Vasconcelos & Karina de A. Rocha - 2016 - Research Integrity and Peer Review 1 (Suppl 1).
    Table of contentsI1 Proceedings of the 4th World Conference on Research IntegrityConcurrent Sessions:1. Countries' systems and policies to foster research integrityCS01.1 Second time around: Implementing and embedding a review of responsible conduct of research policy and practice in an Australian research-intensive universitySusan Patricia O'BrienCS01.2 Measures to promote research integrity in a university: the case of an Asian universityDanny Chan, Frederick Leung2. Examples of research integrity education programmes in different countriesCS02.1 Development of a state-run “cyber education program of research ethics” (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  45
    Comparative Analysis of the Risk-Handling Procedures for Gene Technology Applications in Medical and Plant Science.Anna Lydia Svalastog, Petter Gustafsson & Stefan Jansson - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (3):465-479.
    In this paper we analyse how the risks associated with research on transgenic plants are regulated in Sweden. The paper outlines the way in which pilot projects in the plant sciences are overseen in Sweden, and discusses the international and national background to the current regulatory system. The historical, and hitherto unexplored, reasons for the evolution of current administrative and legislative procedures in plant science are of particular interest. Specifically, we discuss similarities and differences in the regulation of medicine and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  25
    Patients, Doctors and Experimentation: Doubts About the Declaration of Helsinki.A. Belsey - 1978 - Journal of Medical Ethics 4 (4):182-185.
    The World Medical Association's Declaration of Helsinki offers guidelines to doctors engaged in biomedical research with human subjects. The fundamental distinction of the Declaration is between clinical research combined with professional care and non-clinical scientific research. If hospital patients are the experimental subjects, then the former research must be carried out by the patient's own doctor, whereas the latter research must not be; it must be carried out by other doctors. The relevance of the distinction between the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44.  47
    Beyond the Genome: Community-Level Analysis of the Microbial World.Iratxe Zarraonaindia, Daniel P. Smith & Jack A. Gilbert - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (2):261-282.
    The development of culture-independent strategies to study microbial diversity and function has led to a revolution in microbial ecology, enabling us to address fundamental questions about the distribution of microbes and their influence on Earth’s biogeochemical cycles. This article discusses some of the progress that scientists have made with the use of so-called “omic” techniques (metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, and metaproteomics) and the limitations and major challenges these approaches are currently facing. These ‘omic methods have been used to describe the taxonomic structure (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  45.  17
    Who Cares? The Declaration of Helsinki and 'The Conscience of Physicians'.James Appleyard - 2008 - Research Ethics 4 (3):106-110.
    The World Medical Association's ‘Declaration of Helsinki’ on Medical Research on Human Subjects is undergoing its sixth revision in its 44 years. The aim of this paper is to put the Declaration into an historical context, define and identify the core ethical principles, and illustrate how these are applied within the Declaration.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  6
    Perceptions of and Barriers to Ethical Promotion of Pharmaceuticals in Pakistan: Perspectives of Medical Representatives and Doctors.Zeeshan Danish, Syed Atif Raza, Imran Imran, Muhammad Islam, Furqan Kurshid Hashmi, Fawad Rasool, Zikria Saleem, Hamid Saeed & Rehan Gul - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-16.
    BackgroundIn Pakistan, drug promotion practices, ethical or unethical, have rarely been in the spotlight. We aimed to assess the perception and barriers of medical representatives and doctors regarding ethical promotion of pharmaceuticals in Pakistan.MethodsA cross sectional survey was conducted in seven major cities of Pakistan for 6-months period. Self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Logistic regression and five-point Likert scale scoring was used to estimate the perceptions and barriers.ResultsCompared to national companies, the medical representatives of multinational companies (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. A Mixed-Methods Investigation of Medical Follow-Up in Long-Term Childhood Cancer Survivors: What Are the Reasons for Non-Attendance?Mareike Ernst, Elmar Brähler, Jörg Faber, Philipp S. Wild, Hiltrud Merzenich & Manfred E. Beutel - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    As long-term childhood cancer survivors are at risk for late effects, ongoing medical care is crucial to detect and treat physical illnesses as early as possible. However, previous research from around the world has shown that many adult survivors did not participate in long-term medical follow-up. This study aimed to provide insight into German survivors’ care situation, with a particular focus on barriers to follow-up care. We investigated a sample of adult CCS drawn from the German Childhood (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  16
    Duke Ferdinand: Patient or Possessed? The Reflection of Contemporary Medical Discourse in John Webster's The Duchess of Malfi.E. Tullo - 2010 - Medical Humanities 36 (1):19-22.
    The Duchess of Malfi, a tragedy written by John Webster, makes frequent reference to contemporary Jacobean concerns about health and disease for dramatic effect. Most notably Webster chooses to highlight lycanthropy through the evolution of the condition in the character of Duke Ferdinand. This paper examines Webster's knowledge of contemporary medical, religious and political texts and explores the reflection of both a natural humoral understanding of lycanthropy as a disease, and the concurrent importance of supernatural concerns prevalent at the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  34
    Informed Consent in Clinical Research in France: Assessment and Factors Associated with Therapeutic Misconception.I. S. Durand-Zaleski, C. Alberti, P. Durieux, X. Duval, S. Gottot, P. Ravaud, S. Gainotti, C. Vincent-Genod, D. Moreau & P. Amiel - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e16-e16.
    Background: Informed consent in clinical research is mandated throughout the world. Both patient subjects and investigators are required to understand and accept the distinction between research and treatment.Aim: To document the extent and to identify factors associated with therapeutic misconception in a population of patient subjects or parent proxies recruited from a variety of multicentre trials .Patients and methods: The study comprised two phases: the development of a questionnaire to assess the quality of informed consent and a survey of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  50.  42
    The Reporting of Irb Review in Journal Articles Presenting Hiv Research Conducted in the Developing World.Robert L. Klitzman, Kelly Kleinert, Hoda Rifai-Bashjawish & L. E. U. Shiung - 2011 - Developing World Bioethics 11 (3):161-169.
    Objectives: We investigated how often journal articles reporting on human HIV research in four developing world countries mention any institutional review boards (IRBs) or research ethics committees (RECs), and what factors are involved.Methods: We examined all such articles published in 2007 from India, Nigeria, Thailand and Uganda, and coded these for several ethical and other characteristics.Results: Of 221 articles meeting inclusion criteria, 32.1% did not mention IRB approval. Mention of IRB approval was associated with: biomedical (versus psychosocial) research (P (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000