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  1. Brian Bocking & Youxuan Wang (2006). Signs of Liberation?—A Semiotic Approach to Wisdom in Chinese Madhyamika Buddhism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (3):375–392.
  2. David Chai (2012). Philosophy and Religion in Early Medieval China. Edited by Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet-Keung Lo . (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2010. V, 375 Pp. Hardback, ISBN 978-1-4384-3187-1. Paperback, ISBN 978-1-4384-3188-8.) Interpretation and Literature in Early Medieval China. Edited by Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet-Keung Lo . (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2010. Vi, 288 Pp. Hardback, ISBN 978-1-4384-3217-5. Paperback, ISBN 978-1-4384-3218-2.). [REVIEW] Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (2):314-316.
  3. Philip J. Ivanhoe (1995). On the Metaphysical Foundations of Neo-and New Confucianism: Reflections on Lauren Pfister's Essay on Religious Confucianism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (1):81-89.
  4. Ha Tai Kim (1977). The Religious Dimension of Neo-Confucianism. Philosophy East and West 27 (3):337-348.
  5. Aaron K. Koseki (1981). The Concept of Practice in San-Lun Thought: Chi-Tsang and the "Concurrent Insight" of the Two Truths. Philosophy East and West 31 (4):449-466.
  6. Shu-hsien Liu (1971). The Religious Import of Confucian Philosophy: Its Traditional Outlook and Contemporary Significance. Philosophy East and West 21 (2):157-175.
    Confucianism has usually been regarded as a secular moral philosophy with no religious import at all. In china, However, Confucianism has been mentioned along with buddhism and taoism as one of the three religions (the so-Called san-Chiao) for centuries. This means that we must revise and broaden our traditional concept of religion. The confucian tradition certainly has its unique way of expressing its ultimate and therefore religious concern. The present essay is an attempt to uncover the religious import in confucian (...)
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  7. Ping-Cheung Lo (2005). Neo-Confucian Religiousness Vis-a-Vis Neoorthodox Protestantism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (3):367-390.
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  8. Edward J. Machle (1980). Leibniz and Confucianism: The Search for Accord, And: Discourse on the Natural Theology of the Chinese (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 18 (4):476-477.
  9. David E. Mungello (1978). Confucianism and Christianity. International Philosophical Quarterly 18 (3):364-366.
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  10. On-Cho Ng (2007). Religious Hermeneutics: Text and Truth in Neo-Confucian Readings of the Yijing. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (1):5-24.
  11. Deborah Sommer (ed.) (1995). Chinese Religion: An Anthology of Sources. Oxford University Press.
    For centuries, westerners have referred to China's numerous traditions of spiritual expression as "religious"--a word born of western thought that cannot completely characterize the passionate writing that fills the pages of this pathbreaking anthology. The first of its kind in well over thirty years, this text offers the student of Chinese ritual and cosmology the broadest range of primary sources from antiquity to the modern era. Readings are arranged chronologically and cover such concepts as Taoism, Confucianism, Buddhism, and even communism. (...)
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  12. Rodney L. Taylor (1975). Neo-Confucianism, Sagehood and the Religious Dimension. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 2 (4):389-415.
  13. David W. Tien (2004). Warranted Neo-Confucian Belief: Religious Pluralism and the Affections in the Epistemologies of Wang Yangming (1472–1529) and Alvin Plantinga. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 55 (1):31-55.
    In this article, I argue that Wang Yangming'sNeo-Confucian religious beliefs can bewarranted, and that the rationality of hisreligious beliefs constitutes a significantdefeater for the rationality of Christianbelief on Alvin Plantinga's theory of warrant. I also question whether the notion of warrantas proper function can adequately account fortheories of religious knowledge in which theaffections play an integral role. Idemonstrate how a consideration of Wang'sepistemology reveals a difficulty forPlantinga's defense of the rationality ofChristian belief and highlights a limitation ofPlantinga's current conception of (...)
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  14. Hoyt Cleveland Tillman (2004). Zhu XI's Prayers to the Spirit of Confucius and Claim to the Transmission of the Way. Philosophy East and West 54 (4):489-513.
    : What philosophical and historical insights might be gained by juxtaposing and linking two distinct areas of Zhu Xi's comments, those on guishen (conventionally glossed as ghosts or spirits) and those on the transmission and succession of the Way (daotong)? There is considerable evidence that he regarded canonical rites for ancestors and teachers as insufficiently satisfying, and thus he sought enhanced communion with the dead. His statements about spirits and especially his prayers to Confucius' spirit served to enhance his confidence (...)
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  15. Xiaomei Yang (2008). Some Issues in Chinese Philosophy of Religion. Philosophy Compass 3 (3):551–569.
    Chinese philosophy of religion is a less discussed and less clearly formed area in the study of Chinese philosophy. It is true that there is virtually no discussion in Chinese philosophy about rationality or justification of religious beliefs comparable to the discussion of the same issues in Western philosophy of religion. The inquiry about rationality and justification of religious beliefs has shaped Western philosophy of religion. However, the scope of philosophy of religion in the Western context has been widened since (...)
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  16. Xinzhong Yao (1996). Confucianism and Christianity: A Comparative Study of Jen and Agape. Distributed in the U.S. By International Specialized Bk. Services.
    The underlying idea presented in this book is that there are similarities as well as differences between Confucianism as Humanistic tradition and Christianity ...
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  17. Maoze Zhang (2011). Confucius' Transformation of Traditional Religious Ideas. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (1):20-40.
    Confucius’ religious thought summarized and utilized existing historical and cultural achievements. He strove to bring problems concerning traditional religious ideas such as destiny, the spirits, ritual propriety and faith into the realm of the rational. He sought to unearth the elements of human reason contained within these and to highlight the sublime and sacred in actual human society. He established a system of religious humanism that incorporated views on edification, faith, destiny, the ghosts and spirits and self-cultivation. Using a dialectic (...)
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