Search results for 'Architecture as Topic history' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. G. A. Bremner & Jonathan Conlin (2011). History as Form: Architecture and Liberal Anglican Thought in the Writings of E. A. Freeman. Modern Intellectual History 8 (2):299-326.score: 414.0
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  2. Edward A. Freeman (2011). History as Form: Architecture and Liberal Anglican Thought in the Writings of Ea Freeman. Modern Intellectual History 8 (2):299-326.score: 414.0
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  3. Patricia Anne Baker, Han Nijdam & Karine van 'T. Land (eds.) (2011). Medicine and Space: Body, Surroundings, and Borders in Antiquity and the Middle Ages. Brill.score: 408.0
    The papers in this volume question how perceptions of space influenced understandings of the body and its functions, illness and treatment, and the surrounding natural and built environments in relation to health in the classical and ...
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  4. Ralph Lieberman (1991). Real Architecture, Imaginary History: The Arsenale Gate as Venetian Mythology. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 54:117-126.score: 405.0
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  5. Caroline van Eck (2012). The Warburg Institute and Architectural History. Common Knowledge 18 (1):134-148.score: 318.0
    At first sight, classical architecture, with its continuous revivals and reworking of the forms of Greek and Roman building, would appear to offer a privileged field in which to apply Warburg's central notion of the survival of classical forms (Nachleben der Antike) and his view of art history's unfolding as a process of remembrance (or Mnemosyne). Yet Warburg himself did not write on architecture. The topic has also largely vanished from the pages of the Journal of (...)
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  6. Juliet L. H. Foster (2014). What Can Social Psychologists Learn From Architecture? The Asylum as Example. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (2):131-147.score: 291.0
    In this paper I argue for a stronger consideration of the possible relationship between social psychology and architecture and architectural history. After a brief review of some of the ways in which other social psychologists have sought to develop links between social psychology and history, I consider the utility of architecture in more depth, especially to the social psychologist interested in the development of knowledge and understanding. I argue that, especially when knowledge is institutionalised, the design (...)
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  7. Kimmo Sarje (2011). Façades and Functions Sigurd Frosterus as a Critic of Architecture. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 22 (40-41).score: 279.0
    Alongside his work as a practising architect, Sigurd Frosterus (1876–1956) was one of Finland’s leading architectural critics during the first decades of the 20th century. In his early life, Frosterus was a strict rationalist who wanted to develop architecture towards scientific ideals instead of historical, archaeological, or mythological approaches. According to him, an architect had to analyse his tasks of construction in order to be able to logically justify his solutions, and he must take advantage of the possibilities of (...)
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  8. Malva Marina Vásquez & Constanza Vargas (2013). Topic history-fiction: Latin-American heterogeneity in Umbral of Juan Emar. Alpha (Osorno) 36:9-28.score: 238.5
    En el apartado Noche 3 de Umbral, Juan Emar se vale de la estrategia de la hibridez genérica al construir una novela-drama que resignifica aportes de la vanguardia metaficcional. Nuestra hipótesis es que mediante la “refuncionalización paródica” (Hutcheon) de la diferencia conceptual entre historia y ficción se despliega una poética vanguardista que acoge el simultaneísmo temporal y espacial. Se trabaja con el enfoque postestructuralista foucaultiano que distingue entre una Historia Global, el metarrelato moderno y una Historia General; la que estudia (...)
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  9. Thomas Mormann (2013). Topology as an Issue for History of Philosophy of Science. In Hanne Andersen, Dennis Dieks, Wenceslao J. Gonzalez, Thomas Uebel & Gregory Wheeler (eds.), New Challenges to Philosophy of Science. Springer. 423--434.score: 234.0
    Since antiquity well into the beginnings of the 20th century geometry was a central topic for philosophy. Since then, however, most philosophers of science, if they took notice of topology at all, considered it as an abstruse subdiscipline of mathematics lacking philosophical interest. Here it is argued that this neglect of topology by philosophy may be conceived of as the sign of a conceptual sea-change in philosophy of science that expelled geometry, and, more generally, mathematics, from the central position (...)
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  10. Mark Jarzombek (2000). The Psychologizing of Modernity: Art, Architecture, and History. Cambridge University Press.score: 231.0
    In The Psychologizing of Modernity, Mark Jarzombek examines the impact of psychology on twentieth-century aesthetics. Analysing the interface between psychology, art history and avant-gardist practices, he also reflects on the longevity of the myth of aesthetic individuality as it infiltrated not only avant-garde art, but also history writing. The principal focus of this study is pre-World War II Germany, where theories of empathy and Entartung emerged; and post-war America, where artists, critics and historians gradually shifted from their reliance (...)
     
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  11. David Hall & Christopher D. Manning, Studying the History of Ideas Using Topic Models.score: 216.0
    How can the development of ideas in a scientific field be studied over time? We apply unsupervised topic modeling to the ACL Anthology to analyze historical trends in the field of Computational Linguistics from 1978 to 2006. We induce topic clusters using Latent Dirichlet Allocation, and examine the strength of each topic over time. Our methods find trends in the field including the rise of probabilistic methods starting in 1988, a steady increase in applications, and a sharp (...)
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  12. Glenn Parsons (2008). Teaching & Learning Guide For: The Aesthetics of Nature. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):1106-1112.score: 192.0
    Traditionally, analytic philosophers writing on aesthetics have given short shrift to nature. The last thirty years, however, have seen a steady growth of interest in this area. The essays and books now available cover central philosophical issues concerning the nature of the aesthetic and the existence of norms for aesthetic judgement. They also intersect with important issues in environmental philosophy. More recent contributions have opened up new topics, such as the relationship between natural sound and music, the beauty of animals, (...)
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  13. Shadi Bartsch & Thomas Bartscherer (eds.) (2005). Erotikon: Essays on Eros, Ancient and Modern. University of Chicago Press.score: 192.0
    Erotikon brings together leading contemporary intellectuals from a variety of fields for an expansive debate on the full meaning of eros . Renowned scholars of philosophy, literature, classics, psychoanalysis, theology, and art history join poets and a novelist to offer fresh insights into a topic that is at once ancient and forever young. Restricted neither by historical period nor by genre, these contributions explore manifestations of eros throughout Western culture, in subjects ranging from ancient philosophy and baroque (...) to modern literature and Hollywood cinema. An idea charged with paradox, eros has always defied categorization, and yet it cannot--it will not--be ignored. Erotikon aims to raise the difficult question of what, if anything, unifies the erotic manifold. How is eros in a sculpture like eros in a poem? Does the ancient story of Cupid and Psyche still speak meaningfully to modern readers, and if so, why? Is Plato's eros the same as Freud's? Or Proust's? And what is the erotic dimension in Nietzsche's thought? While each essay takes on a specific issue, together they constitute a wide-ranging conversation in which these broader questions are at play. A compilation of the latest, best efforts to reckon with eros , Erotikon will appeal not just to scholars and educators, but also to artists and critics, to the curious and the disillusioned, to the prurient and the prudent. Contributors: Shadi Bartsch Peter Brooks J. M. Coetzee Catharine Edwards Anthony Grafton Tom Gunning David M. Halperin Valentina Izmirlieva Jonathan Lear Eric Marty Susan Mitchell Glenn W. Most Martha C. Nussbaum Robert B. Pippin James I. Porter Philippe Roger Ingrid D. Rowland Eric L. Santner Mark Strand David Tracy Richard Wollheim Slavoj Zizek. (shrink)
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  14. Ben Segal (2012). An Interview with Lance Olsen. Continent 2 (1):40-43.score: 192.0
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 40–43. Lance Olsen is a professor of Writing and Literature at the University of Utah, Chair of the FC2 Board of directors, and, most importantly, author or editor of over twenty books of and about innovative literature. He is one of the true champions of prose as a viable contemporary art form. He has just published Architectures of Possibility (written with Trevor Dodge), a book that—as Olsen's works often do—exceeds the usual boundaries of its genre as it (...)
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  15. Dmitri Levitin (2012). The Experimentalist as Humanist: Robert Boyle on the History of Philosophy. Annals of Science:1-34.score: 183.0
    Summary Historians of science have neglected early modern natural philosophers' varied attitudes to the history of philosophy, often preferring to use loose labels such as ?Epicureanism? to describe the survival of ancient doctrines. This is methodologically inappropriate: reifying such philosophical movements tells us little about the complex ways in which early modern natural philosophers approached the history of their own discipline. As this article shows, a central figure of early modern natural philosophy, Robert Boyle, invested great intellectual energy (...)
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  16. C. R. Blease (2013). Electroconvulsive Therapy, the Placebo Effect and Informed Consent. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):166-170.score: 180.0
    Major depressive disorder is not only the most widespread mental disorder in the world, it is a disorder on the rise. In cases of particularly severe forms of depression, when all other treatment options have failed, the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a recommended treatment option for patients. ECT has been in use in psychiatric practice for over 70 years and is now undergoing something of a restricted renaissance following a sharp decline in its use in the 1970s. Despite (...)
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  17. Christina Brandt (2012). Hybrid Times: Theses on the Temporalities of Cloning. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 35 (1):75-81.score: 180.0
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  18. Andrea Sauchelli (2012). On Architecture as a Spatial Art. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 23 (43):53-64.score: 171.0
    I present and evaluate various criticisms against the view that architecture and architectural value are to be understood solely in terms of internal space. I conclude that the architectural value of a building should not be limited to its internal spatial effects because the value of other elements, such as (non-spatial) function, materials, ornamentation, and so on cannot all be reduced to spatial values.
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  19. Jessica S. Dietrich (2001). Dead Parrots Society. American Journal of Philology 123 (1):95-110.score: 171.0
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  20. J. Edwards (2000). Philology and Cuisine in De Re Coquinaria. American Journal of Philology 122 (2):255-263.score: 171.0
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  21. W. E. Major (2001). Farting for Dollars: A Note on Agyrrhios in Aristophanes Wealth 176. American Journal of Philology 123 (4):549-557.score: 171.0
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  22. J. A. Greppin (1986). Latin Nenia and the Armenian Galen Dictionary. American Journal of Philology 108 (3):487-490.score: 171.0
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  23. R. D. Griffith (1994). A Homeric Metaphor Cluster Describing Teeth, Tongue, and Words. American Journal of Philology 116 (1):1-5.score: 171.0
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  24. K. Ormand (2003). Marriage, Identity, and the Tale of Mestra in the Hesiodic Catalogue of Women. American Journal of Philology 125 (3):303-338.score: 171.0
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  25. W. Bernardi (2000). [The controversy over animal electricity in 18th-century Italy: Galvani, Volta, and others]. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 54 (1):53-70.score: 171.0
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  26. D. Fauque (2000). [On the good use of eulogies: the case of Pierre Bouguer]. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 54 (3):351-382.score: 171.0
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  27. J. S. Romm (1988). Aristotle's Elephant and the Myth of Alexander's Scientific Patronage. American Journal of Philology 110 (4):566-575.score: 171.0
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  28. José Ferreirós Domínguez & Jeremy Gray (eds.) (2006). The Architecture of Modern Mathematics: Essays in History and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 170.0
    This edited volume, aimed at both students and researchers in philosophy, mathematics and history of science, highlights leading developments in the overlapping areas of philosophy and the history of modern mathematics. It is a coherent, wide ranging account of how a number of topics in the philosophy of mathematics must be reconsidered in the light of the latest historical research and how a number of historical accounts can be deepened by embracing philosophical questions.
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  29. Philip G. Cerny (1990). The Changing Architecture of Politics: Structure, Agency, and the Future of the State. Sage.score: 168.0
    A landmark study in the field of political science, The Changing Architecture of Politics charts the profound structural changes taking place in the late twentieth-century state. Looking at both theory and practice, Cerny argues that political structures--states in the broadest sense--are the key to understanding both the history and the future of modern politics. Included for discussion are such salient topics as the problem of locating institutional and structural theory within political and social science, how to describe and (...)
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  30. Toni Brennan & Peter Hegarty (2009). Magnus Hirschfeld, His Biographies and the Possibilities and Boundaries of 'Biography' as 'Doing History'. History of the Human Sciences 22 (5):24-46.score: 165.0
    This article considers the two major biographies of sexologist Magnus Hirschfeld, MD (1868—1935), an early campaigner for ‘gay rights’ avant la lettre. Like him, his first biographer Charlotte Wolff (1897—1986) was a Jewish doctor who lived and worked in Weimar Republic Berlin and fled Germany when the Nazi regime came to power. When researching Hirschfeld’s biography (published in English in 1986) Wolff met a librarian and gay activist, Manfred Herzer, who would eventually be a cofounder of the Gay Museum in (...)
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  31. Jari Kaukua & Vili Lähteenmäki (2010). Subjectivity as a Non-Textual Standard of Interpretation in the History of Philosophical Psychology. History & Theory 48 (1):21-37.score: 162.0
    Contemporary caution against anachronism in intellectual history, and the currently momentous theoretical emphasis on subjectivity in the philosophy of mind, are two prevailing conditions that set puzzling constraints for studies in the history of philosophical psychology. The former urges against assuming ideas, motives, and concepts that are alien to the historical intellectual setting under study, and combined with the latter suggests caution in relying on our intuitions regarding subjectivity due to the historically contingent characterizations it has attained in (...)
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  32. Abraham Akkerman (2006). Femininity and Masculinity in City-Form: Philosophical Urbanism as a History of Consciousness. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):229 - 256.score: 159.0
    Mutual feedback between human-made environments and facets of thought throughout history has yielded two myths: the Garden and the Citadel. Both myths correspond to Jung’s feminine and masculine collective subconscious, as well as to Nietzsche’s premise of Apollonian and Dionysian impulses in art. Nietzsche’s premise suggests, furthermore, that the feminine myth of the Garden is time-bound whereas the masculine myth of the Citadel, or the Ideal City, constitutes a spatial deportment. Throughout history the two myths have continually molded (...)
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  33. Joel D. Velasco (2013). Phylogeny as Population History. Philosophy and Theory in Biology 5 (20130604).score: 159.0
    The project of this paper is to understand what a phylogenetic tree represents and to discuss some of the implications that this has for the practice of systematics. At least the first part of this task, if not both parts, might appear trivial—or perhaps better suited for a single page in a textbook rather than a scholarly research paper. But this would be a mistake. While the task of interpreting phylogenetic trees is often treated in a trivial way, their interpretation (...)
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  34. Andrea Sauchelli (2012). The Structure and Content of Architectural Experience: Scruton on Architecture as Art. Estetika 49 (1):26-44.score: 159.0
    The notion of architectural experience has been explored by Roger Scruton in an essay in which he provides an account of both its structure and content, along with clarifications of certain key concepts in architectural criticism, such as architectural success and architectural beauty. In this article, I introduce Scruton’s theory and argue that, despite its intuitive appeal, some crucial elements for the appreciation of buildings as works of architecture are not adequately addressed there. I then propose various ways of (...)
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  35. Krystyna Najder-Stefaniak (2007). Architecture as the Art of Shaping the Human Environment and Human Space. Dialogue and Universalism 17 (12):115-121.score: 159.0
    The author suggests to view the architectural planning of the human environment as „directing” the phenomena and events that occur in human surroundings. In her reflections on human existence she juxtaposes the concepts “environment” and “space”, which both accentuate different aspects of the human environment. The author views “environment” as the objective existence of human surroundings, and “space” as the effect of environmental envisionment and experiencing the environment by means of rationality and valuation.The author also focuses on interactions between the (...)
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  36. William H. Dray (1995). History as Re-Enactment: R.G. Collingwood's Idea of History. Oxford University Press.score: 156.0
    This book explains and defends a central ideas in the theory of history put forward by R. G. Collingwood, perhaps the foremost philosopher of history in the 20th century. Professor Dray analyses critically the idea of re-enactment, explores the limits of its applicability, and determines its relationship to other key Collingwoodian ideas, such as the role of imagination in historical thinking, and the indispensability of a point of view.
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  37. Eric Palmer (1993). Lakatos’ “Internal History” as Historiography. Perspectives on Science 1 (4).score: 156.0
    Imre Lakatos' conception of the history of science is explicated with the purpose of replying to criticism leveled against it by Thomas Kuhn, Ian Hacking, and others. Kuhn's primary argument is that the historian's internal—external distinction is methodologically superior to Lakatos' because it is "independent" of an analysis of rationality. That distinction, however, appears to be a normative one, harboring an implicit and unarticulated appeal to rationality, despite Kuhn's claims to the contrary. Lakatos' history, by contrast, is clearly (...)
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  38. B. I. B. Lindahl, Aant Elzinga & Alfred Welljams-Dorof (1998). Credit for Discoveries: Citation Data as a Basis for History of Science Analysis. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (6):609-620.score: 156.0
    Citation data have become an increasingly significant source of information for historians, sociologists, and other researchers studying the evolution of science. In the past few decades elaborate methodologies have been developed for the use of citation data in the study of the modern history of science. This article focuses on how citation indexes make it possible to trace the background and development of discoveries as well as to assess the credit that publishing scientists assign to particular discoverers. Kuhn's notion (...)
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  39. George Parkin Grant (1969). Time as History. [Toronto]Canadian Broadcasting Corp..score: 156.0
    In Time as History, a collection of his 1969 Massey lectures, George Grant reviews the thought of Nietzsche and concludes that the conception of time as history ...
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  40. W. Jan van der Dussen (1981). History as a Science: The Philosophy of R.G. Collingwood. Distributors, Kluwer Boston.score: 156.0
    The Philosophy of R.G. Collingwood W. J. Van Der Dussen. Collingwood's conclusion is that " ... science, even at its best, always falls short of understanding the facts as they really are"88. Only history is able to realize this. It is another ...
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  41. Paula Viterbo (2007). History of Science as Interdisciplinary Education in American Colleges: Its Origins, Advantages, and Pitfalls. Journal of Research Practice 3 (2):Article M16.score: 156.0
    Before 1950, history of science did not exist as an independent academic branch, but was instead pursued by practitioners across various humanities and scientific disciplines. After professionalization, traces of its prehistory as a cross-disciplinary area of interest bound to an interdisciplinary, educational philosophy have remained. This essay outlines the development of history of science as an interdisciplinary academic field, and argues that it constitutes an obvious choice for inclusion in an interdisciplinary academic program, provided faculty and administrators learn (...)
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  42. José Ortega Y. Gasset (1961/1981). History as a System: And Other Essays Toward a Philosophy of History. Greenwood Press.score: 156.0
    The sportive origin of the state -- Unity and diversity of Europe -- Man the technician -- History as a system.
     
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  43. Hans-Jörg Rheinberger (2012). A Plea for a Historical Epistemology of Research. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 43 (1):105-111.score: 153.0
    The paper approaches the topic of what a general philosophy of science could mean today from the perspective of a historical epistemology. Consequently, in a first step, the paper looks at the notion of generality in the sciences, and how it evolved over time, on the example of the life sciences. In the second part of the paper, the urgency of a general philosophy of science is located in the history of philosophy of science. Two attempts at the (...)
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  44. Ian Hunter (2005). The State of History and the Empire of Metaphysics. History and Theory 44 (2):289–303.score: 153.0
    One of the curious things about this challenging book is that its ostensible subject— the Saxon medical and political scientist Hermann Conring (1606–1681)— is not mentioned in the title. Constantin Fasolt argues that we cannot know what Conring really thought or meant in his writings, which means that his topic cannot be Conring as such and must instead be that which occludes our knowledge of him, the titular limits of history. Given that we do in fact learn a (...)
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  45. Nikolaj Plotnikov (2012). «The Person is a Monad with Windows»: Sketch of a Conceptual History of 'Person' in Russia. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 64 (3-4):269-299.score: 153.0
    The basic concepts 'person' (Person), I/self (Ich) and 'subject' (Subjekt) structuring the Russian discourse of personhood (Personalität) developed during the philosophical discussions of the 1820s-1840s. The development occurred in the course of an intense reception of German Idealism and Romanticism. Characteristic of this process is that the modern meaning of personhood going back to the theological and natural-law interpretations of the person in Western Europe does not exist in the Russian cultural consciousness. Therefore the Russian concepts of personhood demonstrate the (...)
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  46. Zenonas Norkus (2005). Mechanisms as Miracle Makers? The Rise and Inconsistencies of the "Mechanismic Approach" in Social Science and History. History and Theory 44 (3):348–372.score: 150.0
    In the increasing body of metatheoretical literature on "causal mechanisms," definitions of "mechanism" proliferate, and these increasingly divergent definitions reproduce older theoretical and methodological oppositions. The reason for this proliferation is the incompatibility of the various metatheoretical expectations directed to them: (1) to serve as an alternative to the scientific theory of individual behavior (for some social theorists, most notably Jon Elster); (2) to provide solutions for causal inference problems in the quantitative social sciences, in social history, and in (...)
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  47. Thony Christie (1990). Nature as a Source in the History of Logic, 1870–1910. History and Philosophy of Logic 11 (1):1-3.score: 150.0
    By using examples drawn from the periodical Nature, I show that research into the history of logic in the nineteenth century involves journals and periodicals which are normally not considered as standard sources for logic or its history.
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  48. Gary Hatfield (2005). The History of Philosophy as Philosophy. In Tom Sorell & G. A. J. Rogers (eds.), Analytic Philosophy and History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 19-22.score: 150.0
    The history of philosophy involves the paradox of supposing the historical invulnerability of past philosophies. The transcendental problem of its possibility is that of the possibility of such an invulnerability. Now experience reveals that, On the one hand, Philosophies remain indestructible, As works of art do, Through an internal truth and that, On the other hand, In establishing them the philosopher does not view them as ends in themselves, The way an artist would do, But through them he seeks (...)
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  49. Roberto Farneti (2006). A Natural History of Crowds, Rulers and Survivors: Elias Canetti as a Political Thinker. History of Political Thought 27 (4):711-735.score: 150.0
    The article stresses the anti-normative thrust in Elias Canetti's thought by focusing on his genealogy of power. The scenario that Canetti opens up in both his major work, Crowds and Power, and his collections of notes, featuring mostly crowds, rulers and survivors, is a terrifying set-up in which things 'happen' (killings, huge gatherings of crowds, piling up of corpses, etc.) though there is no rational and accountable agency to explain them. His denial of the existence of a rational agency operating (...)
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  50. Michael Rosen (2011). The History of Ideas as Philosophy and History. History of Political Thought 32 (4):691-720.score: 150.0
    This article argues for a conception of the history of ideas that treats philosophy historically while avoiding sociological reductionism. On the view presented here, philosophical problems characteristically arise from a conflict of commitments, at least some of which have roots in wider forms of life and ways of seeing the world. In bringing such 'doxa' to our attention, the history of ideas, it is argued, plays a role that is both genuinely historical and, at the same time, contributes (...)
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