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  1. Jeanine Grenberg (unknown). Anthropology, History, and Education : KantImmanuel,.1724-1804Anthropology, History, and Education. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):474-475.
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  2. Jeanine Grenberg (2014). Humility, Kantian Style. In Stan van Hooft & Nafsika Athanassoulis (eds.), The Handbook of Virtue Ethics. Acumen Publishing Ltd..
     
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  3. Jeanine M. Grenberg (2014). Kant's Questions: What is the Human Being? By Patrick R. Frierson. Mind 123 (490):592-598.
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  4. Jeanine Grenberg (2011). Making Sense of the Relationship of Reason and Sensibility in Kant's Ethics. Kantian Review 16 (3):461-472.
    In this essay, I look at some claims Anne Margaret Baxley makes, in her recent book Kant's Theory of Virtue: The Value of Autocracy, about the relationship between reason and sensibility in Kant's theory of virtue. I then reflect on tensions I find in these claims as compared to the overall goal of her book: an account of Kant's conception of virtue as autocracy. Ultimately, I argue that interpreters like Baxley who want to welcome a more robust role for feeling (...)
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  5. Jeanine Grenberg (2010). Demons, Dreamers & Madmen. Teaching Philosophy 33 (2):210-212.
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  6. Jeanine Grenberg (2010). In Search of the Phenomenal Face of Freedom. In Benjamin Lipscomb & James Krueger (eds.), Kant's Moral Metaphysics: God, Freedom, and Immortality. De Gruyter. 111.
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  7. Jeanine Grenberg (2010). What is the Enemy of Virtue? In Lara Denis (ed.), Kant's Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  8. Jeanine M. Grenberg (2010). Social Dimensions of Kant's Conception of Radical Evil. In Sharon Anderson-Gold & Pablo Muchnik (eds.), Kant's Anatomy of Evil. Cambridge University Press.
  9. Jeanine M. Grenberg (2009). Anthropology, History, and Education (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 474-475.
    We are told in the introduction to this volume that what holds together such an apparently diverse collection of essays under a single rubric is the theme of "human nature." And this is fair enough: themes ranging from Kant's reflections on physiology, to his investigation of the vexed notion of what it is that constitutes a race, to his reflections on philosophy of history, to his lectures on pedagogy all fit reasonably enough under the rubric of "human nature." All point (...)
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  10. Jeanine M. Grenberg (2009). The Phenomenological Failure of Groundwork III. Inquiry 52 (4):335 – 356.
    Henry Allison and Paul Guyer have recently offered interpretations of Kant's argument in Groundwork III. These interpretations share this premise: the argument moves from a non-moral, theoretical premise to a moral conclusion, and the failure of the argument is a failure to make this jump from the non-moral to the moral. This characterization both of the nature of the argument and its failure is flawed. Consider instead the possibility that in Groundwork III, Kant is struggling toward something rather different from (...)
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  11. Jeanine Grenberg (2007). Courageous Humility in Jane Austen's Mansfield Park. Social Theory and Practice 33 (4):645-666.
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  12. Jeanine Grenberg (2007). Dependent and Corrupt Rational Agency. Kant-Studien 98 (1):81-105.
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  13. Jeanine Grenberg (2007). Imagination in Kant's Critique of Practical Reason. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (2):335-336.
    Jeanine Grenberg - Imagination in Kant's Critique of Practical Reason - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 45.2 335-336 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Jeanine M. Grenberg St. Olaf College Bernard Freydberg. Imagination in Kant's Critique of Practical Reason. Bloomington-Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2005. Pp. xiii + 180. Paper, $19.95. At the heart of the task of the historian of philosophy is the effort to interpret well what has been said (...)
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  14. Jeanine Grenberg (2007). John W. Yolton: The Two Intellectual Worlds of John Locke. Faith and Philosophy 24 (1):107-109.
  15. Jeanine M. Grenberg (2007). Précis of Kant and the Ethics of Humility: A Story of Dependence, Corruption and Virtue. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (3):622–623.
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  16. Jeanine M. Grenberg (2007). Replies. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (3):640–654.
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  17. Jeanine M. Grenberg (2006). Kant and the Empiricists. International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (3):375-377.
  18. Rex Butler, John D. Caputo, Michael J. Scanlon, Tina Chanter, Ewa Plonowska Ziarek & Jeanine Grenberg (2005). James W. Allard, The Logical Foundations of Bradley's Metaphysics: Judgment, Inference, and Truth (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005). Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 26 (2).
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  19. Jeanine Grenberg (2005). Kant and the Ethics of Humility: A Story of Dependence, Corruption and Virtue. Cambridge University Press.
    In recent years, philosophers have either ignored the virtue of humility or found it to be in need of radical redefinition. But humility is a central human virtue, and it is the purpose of this book to defend that claim from a Kantian point of view. Jeanine Grenberg argues that we can indeed speak of Aristotelian-style, but still deeply Kantian, virtuous character traits. She proposes moving from focus on action to focus on person, not leaving the former behind, but instead (...)
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  20. Jeanine M. Grenberg (2001). Feeling, Desire and Interest in Kant's Theory of Action. Kant-Studien 92 (2):153-179.
    Henry Allison's “Incorporation Thesis” has played an important role in recent discussions of Kantian ethics. By focussing on Kant's claim that “a drive [Triebfeder] can determine the will to an action only so far as the individual has incorporated it into his maxim,” (Rel 19, translation slightly modified) Allison has successfully argued against Kant's critics that desire-based non-moral action can be free action. His work has thus opened the door for a wide range of discussions which integrate feeling into (...)
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  21. Jeanine Grenberg (1999). Review: Kneller & Axinn, Autonomy and Community: Readings in Contemporary Kantian Social Philosophy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (3):538-540.
  22. Jeanine Grenberg (1999). Anthropology From a Metaphysical Point of View. Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (1):91-115.
    I argue that there can be, on Kant's account, a significant motivational role for feeling in moral action. I first discuss and reject Andrews Reath's claim that Kant is forced to disallow a motivational role for feeling because of his rejection of moral sense theory. I then consider and reject the more general challenge that allowing a role for the influence of feeling on the faculty of desire undermines Kant's commitment to a morality free from anthropological considerations. I conclude by (...)
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  23. Jeanine Grenberg (1999). Review: Munzel, Kant's Conception of Moral Character: The Critical Link of Morality, Anthropology and Reflective Judgment. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 3 (1):146-148.
  24. Jeanine Grenberg (1996). Review: Hudson, Kant's Compatibilism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (3):466-468.
    466 JOURNAL OF THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY 34:3 JULY 1996 offered in Rameau's Nephew called into question his long-held conviction that "even in a society as poorly ordered as ours.., there is no better path to happiness than to be a good man," Hulliung tends to assume too quickly that the Nephew's attacks on this belief carry the day . Diderot did, after all, eventually provide the Nephew's antago- nist with some responses and, while these may not always convince us, (...)
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