This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
102 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 102
  1. Fernando Andacht (2001). Those Powerful Materialized Dreams: Peirce on Icons and the Human Imagination. American Journal of Semiotics 17 (3):91-116.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Richard E. Aquila (1988). Self-Consciousness, Self-Determination, and Imagination in Kant. Topoi 7 (1):65-79.
    I argue for a basically Sartrean approach to the idea that one's self-concept, and any form of knowledge of oneself as an individual subject, presupposes concepts and knowledge about other things. The necessity stems from a pre-conceptual structure which assures that original self-consciousness is identical with one's consciousness of objects themselves. It is not a distinct accomplishment merely dependent on the latter. The analysis extends the matter/form distinction to concepts. It also requires a distinction between two notions of consciousness: one (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Andrew Arana (2016). Imagination in Mathematics. In Amy Kind (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination. Routledge 463-477.
  4. R. Attfield (1970). Berkeley and Imagination. Philosophy 45 (173):237 - 239.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Gary Banham (2005). Kant's Transcendental Imagination. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The role and place of transcendental psychology in Kant's Critique of Pure Reason has been a source of some contention. This work presents a detailed argument for restoring transcendental psychology to a central place in the interpretation of Kant's Analytic, in the process providing a detailed response to more "austere" analytic readings.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Jennifer Ann Bates (1997). The Genesis and Spirit of Imagination. Dissertation, University of Toronto (Canada)
    Given the importance of imagination for Kant, Fichte and Schelling, it is significant that the word only comes up once in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit, and that it is not a chapter heading alongside "Sense-Certainty," "Perception," "Understanding" and "Reason." ;Part I. "Imagination in Theory" looks at the development in Hegel's theory of imagination from the Differenzschrift and Faith and Knowledge, through three different versions of the Philosophy of Spirit . Part II. "Imagination in Practice," focuses on the final moment of (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. I. Berlin (1976). Vicos Philosophy of Imagination-Reply. Social Research 43 (3):426-429.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Sophie Berman (1998). Descartes's Imagination. International Philosophical Quarterly 38 (4):457-458.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Harry Blocker (1965). Kant's Theory of the Relation of Imagination and Understanding in Aesthetic Judgements of Taste. British Journal of Aesthetics 5 (1):37-45.
  10. Richard Bodéüs (1990). Imagination Et Action Chez Aristote. Dialogue 29 (01):5-.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Gerald Bonner (1995). Soundings in St. Augustine's Imagination. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 69 (4):633-636.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Stephen Boulter (2011). The Medieval Origins of Conceivability Arguments. Metaphilosophy 42 (5):617-641.
    The central recommendation of this article is that philosophers trained in the analytic tradition ought to add the sensibilities and skills of the historian to their methodological toolkit. The value of an historical approach to strictly philosophical matters is illustrated by a case study focussing on the medieval origin of conceivability arguments and contemporary views of modality. It is shown that common metaphilosophical views about the nature of the philosophical enterprise as well as certain inference patterns found in thinkers from (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13. Daniel Breazeale (1984). Imagination and Reflection: Intersubjectivity. Fichte's "Grundlage" of 1794. Journal of the History of Philosophy 22 (4):487-490.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. A. D. Fitton Brown (1966). Nicolaos C. Hourmouziades: Production and Imagination in Euripides: Form and Function of the Scenic Space. (Greek Society for Humanistic Studies, Publications, 2nd Series, No. 5.) Pp. Xii + 180. Athens, 1965. (Obtainable From the Institute of Books, 51 Stadiou, Athens 121.) Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 16 (02):232-233.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Ty D. Camp, From the Schematic to the Symbolic: The Radical Possibilities of the Imagination in Kant's Third Critique.
    In this thesis it is argued that Kant's Copernican turn depends on his doctrine of the imagination, and that by understanding the role of imagination as symbolic rather than schematic, the resources are provided to show that his critical philosophy has more radical possibilities than those of his post-Kantian critics. To display this, it is first pointed out that the crucial role the imagination plays in Kant's Copernican turn is not fully developed in his first Critique. Next, it is argued (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Victor Caston (1996). Why Aristotle Needs Imagination. Phronesis 41 (1):20-55.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  17. Raz D. Chen-Morris (2001). Optics, Imagination, and the Construction of Scientific Observation in Kepler's New Science. The Monist 84 (4):453-486.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  18. Timothy M. Costelloe (2007). Hume's Phenomenology of the Imagination. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 5 (1):31-45.
    This paper examines the role of the imagination in Hume's epistemology. Three specific powers of the imagination are identified – the imagistic, conceptual and productive – as well as three corresponding kinds of fictions based on the degree of belief contained in each class of ideas the imagination creates. These are generic fictions, real and mere fictions, and necessary fictions, respectively. Through these manifestations, it is emphasized, Hume presents the imagination both as the positive force behind human creativity and a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19. Daniel Dahlstrom (2010). The Critique of Pure Reason and Continental Philosophy: Heidegger's Interpretation of Transcendental Imagination. In Paul Guyer (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. Cambridge University Press
  20. Mary Domski (2010). Kant on the Imagination and Geometrical Certainty. Perspectives on Science 18 (4):409-431.
    My goal in this paper is to develop our understanding of the role the imagination plays in Kant’s Critical account of geometry, and I do so by attending to how the imagination factors into the method of reasoning Kant assigns the geometer in the First Critique. Such an approach is not unto itself novel. Recent commentators, such as Friedman (1992) and Young (1992), have taken a careful look at the constructions of the productive imagination in pure intuition and highlighted the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21. Fabian Dorsch (2012). The Unity of Imagining. Ontos.
    Please send me an email (fabian.dorsch@unifr.ch) if you wish to receive a copy of the book. — 'In this highly ambitious, wide ranging, immensely impressive and ground-breaking work Fabian Dorsch surveys just about every account of the imagination that has ever been proposed. He identifies five central types of imagining that any unifying theory must accommodate and sets himself the task of determining whether any theory of what imagining consists in covers these five paradigms. Focussing on what he takes to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22. Jamie Dow (2009). Feeling Fantastic? - Emotions and Appearances in Aristotle. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 37:143-175.
  23. François Dugré (1990). Le Rôle de l'Imagination Dans le Mouvement Animal Et l'Action Humaine Chez Aristote. Dialogue 29 (01):65-.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Kathleen Eamon (2005). Hegel's Theory of Imagination (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of Speculative Philosophy 19 (4):257-259.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Brian Elliott (2004). Phenomenology and Imagination in Husserl and Heidegger. Routledge.
    Phenomenology is one of the most pervasive and influential schools of thought in twentieth-century European philosophy. This book provides a systematic and comprehensive analysis of the idea of the imagination in Husserl and Heidegger. The author also locates phenomenology within the broader context of a philosophical world dominated by Kantian thought, arguing that the location of Husserl within the Kantian landscape is essential to an adequate understanding of phenomenology both as an historical event and as a legacy for present and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  26. Joyce Engmann (1976). Imagination and Truth in Aristotle. Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (3):259-265.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Alfredo Ferrarin (2008). Imagination and Judgment in Kant's Practical Philosophy. Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (1-2):101-121.
    My aim in this article is to understand the role of imagination and practical judgment in Kant's moral philosophy. After a comparison of Kant with Rousseau, I explore Kant's moral philosophy itself — unlike Hannah Arendt, who finds in the enlarged mentality of the third Critique the ground for the activity of imagination in a shared world. Instead, I place the concept of moral legislation in its background, the reflection on particulars relevant to deliberation, and discuss the mutual relation of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Alfredo Ferrarin (2003). Imagination and Hobbes. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 24 (2):5-27.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. M. Jamie Ferreira (1994). Hume and Imagination. International Philosophical Quarterly 34 (1):39-57.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  30. Desmond J. FitzGerald (1996). Soundings in St. Augustine's Imagination. International Philosophical Quarterly 36 (2):238-240.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Véronique M. Fóti (1986). The Cartesian Imagination. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 46 (4):631-642.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  32. E. J. Furlong (1961). Imagination in Hume's Treatise and Enquiry Concerning the Human Understanding. Philosophy 36 (136):62 - 70.
    The author addresses two questions concerning hume's philosophy: (1) why is imagination so prominent in hume's thought? and (2) what exactly did hume mean by imagination? (staff).
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Sarah L. Gibbons (1994). Kant's Theory of Imagination: Bridging Gaps in Judgement and Experience. Oxford University Press.
    This book departs from much of the scholarship on Kant by demonstrating the centrality of imagination to Kant's philosophy as a whole. In Kant's works, human experience is simultaneously passive and active, thought and sensed, free and unfree: these dualisms are often thought of as unfortunate byproducts of his system. Gibbons, however, shows that imagination performs a vital function in "bridging gaps" between the different elements of cognition and experience. Thus, the role imagination plays in Kant's works expresses his fundamental (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  34. Simon Goldhill (1990). Paul Veyne: Did the Greeks Believe in Their Myths? An Essay on the Constitutive Imagination (Translated by Paula Wissing From the Original 1983 French Edition). Pp. Xii + 161. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1988. £19.95 (Paper, £8.75). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 40 (01):172-.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Gabriel Gottlieb (2007). Review: Kneller, Kant and the Power of Imagination. [REVIEW] Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 28 (2):189-194.
  36. Jeanine Grenberg (2007). Imagination in Kant's Critique of Practical Reason. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (2):335-336.
    Jeanine Grenberg - Imagination in Kant's Critique of Practical Reason - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 45.2 335-336 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Jeanine M. Grenberg St. Olaf College Bernard Freydberg. Imagination in Kant's Critique of Practical Reason. Bloomington-Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2005. Pp. xiii + 180. Paper, $19.95. At the heart of the task of the historian of philosophy is the effort to interpret well what has been said (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Daniel Guevara (2009). Kant and the Power of Imagination (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (4):pp. 629-630.
    Kant and the Power of the Imagination discusses some neglected literature from the early German Romantic period—one major text that Kneller discusses was not published until the manuscript, lost for decades, resurfaced at an auction in New York in the 1960s. Kneller argues that this unduly neglected literature makes a productive and illuminating contribution to Kant’s program in the three Critiques. More particularly, she argues that it contributes to our understanding of the true philosophical potential of the role of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Paolo Guietti (1997). Descartes's Imagination. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 71 (2):275-279.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. J. B. Hainsworth (1972). Homeric Imagination Paolo Vivante: The Homeric Imagination. A Study of Homer's Poetic Perception of Reality. Pp. Viii+215. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1970. Cloth, $7.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 22 (03):318-320.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Ray L. Hart (1965). The Imagination in Plato. International Philosophical Quarterly 5 (3):436-461.
  41. T. P. Hohler (1982). Imagination and Reflection: Intersubjectivity: Fichte's Grundlage of 1794. Distributors for the United States and Canada, Kluwer Boston.
    INTRODUCTION There are only real men. With the emergence of philosophical questioning there concurrently emerges a subject who gives orientation to the ...
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Robert Hopkins (forthcoming). Sartre. In Amy Kind (ed.), Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Imagination. Routledge 82-93.
    In The Imaginary Sartre offers a systematic, insightful and heterodox account of imagining in many forms. Beginning with four ‘characteristics’ he takes to capture the phenomenology of imagining, he draws on considerations both philosophical and psychological to describe the deeper nature of the state that has those features. The result is a view that remains the most potent challenge to the Humean orthodoxy that to this day dominates both philosophical and psychological thinking on the topic.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Robert D. Hume (1970). Kant and Coleridge on Imagination. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 28 (4):485-496.
  44. Lawrence F. Hundersmarck (2003). 4. The Use of Imagination, Emotion, and the Will in a Medieval Classic: The Meditaciones Vite Christi. Logos 6 (2).
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Dale Jacquette (2009). Collingwood on Historical Authority and Historical Imagination. Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (1):55-78.
    R. G. Collingwood's philosophy of history is explained and critically evaluated. Collingwood advances an objective idealist historiography, according to which it is necessary for the historian to enter vicariously into the thoughts of historically interesting decision makers, literally re-thinking them in order to understand their reasoning in historical context. A detailed exposition of Collingwood's theory is presented, identifying its central features as they developed from the early to later periods of his philosophy. Collingwood's remarkable inversion of the positivist unity of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Susan James (2010). Narrative as the Means to Freedom: Spinoza on the Uses of Imagination. In Yitzhak Y. Melamed & Michael A. Rosenthal (eds.), Spinoza's 'Theological-Political Treatise': A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press 250.
  47. Julia Jansen (2005). On the Development of Husserl's Transcendental Phenomenology of Imagination and its Use for Interdisciplinary Research. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):121-132.
    In this paper I trace Husserl’s transformation of his notion of phantasy from its strong leanings towards empiricism into a transcendental phenomenology of imagination. Rejecting the view that this account is only more incompatible with contemporary neuroscientific research, I instead claim that the transcendental suspension of naturalistic (or scientific) pretensions precisely enables cooperation between the two distinct realms of phenomenology and science. In particular, a transcendental account of phantasy can disclose the specific accomplishments of imagination without prematurely deciding upon a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  48. T. E. Jessop (1930). Gianfrancesco Pico Della Mirandola “On the Imagination.” By H. Caplan, Assistant Professor of Classics in Cornell University. New Haven: Yale University Press, for Cornell University. England: Milford and Oxford University Press. 1930. Pp. Ix + 102. Price 4s. 6d., Wrappers. [REVIEW] Philosophy 5 (19):486-.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Lindsay Judson (1991). Mind and Imagination in Aristotle. Ancient Philosophy 11 (2):434-439.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Richard Kearney (1988). Paul Ricoeur and the Hermeneutic Imagination. Philosophy and Social Criticism 14 (2):115-145.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 102