132 found
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  1. Kim Sterelny (2003). Thought in a Hostile World. Blackwell.
  2. Kim Sterelny (2010). Minds: Extended or Scaffolded? [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):465-481.
    This paper discusses two perspectives, each of which recognises the importance of environmental resources in enhancing and amplifying our cognitive capacity. One is the Clark–Chalmers model, extended further by Clark and others. The other derives from niche construction models of evolution, models which emphasise the role of active agency in enhancing the adaptive fit between agent and world. In the human case, much niche construction is epistemic: making cognitive tools and assembling other informational resources that support and scaffold intelligent action. (...)
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  3. Kim Sterelny & Paul E. Griffiths (2002). Sex and Death. An Introduction to Philosophy of Biology (M. Matthen). Philosophical Books 43 (1):78-78.
     
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  4. Kim Sterelny (1990/1991). The Representational Theory of Mind. Blackwell.
  5.  49
    James Maclaurin & Kim Sterelny (2008). What is Biodiversity? University of Chicago Press.
    What Is Biodiversity? is a theoretical and conceptual exploration of the biological world and how diversity is valued. Maclaurin and Sterelny explore not only the origins of the concept of biodiversity, but also how that concept has been shaped by ecology and more recently by conservation biology. They explain the different types of biodiversity important in evolutionary theory, developmental biology, ecology, morphology and taxonomy and conclude that biological heritage is rich in not just one biodiversity but many. Maclaurin and Sterelny (...)
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  6.  44
    Kim Sterelny & Ben Fraser (forthcoming). Evolution and Moral Realism. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axv060.
    We are moral apes, a difference between humans and our relatives that has received significant recent attention in the evolutionary literature. Evolutionary accounts of morality have often been recruited in support of error theory: moral language is truth-apt, but substantive moral claims are never true. In this article, we: locate evolutionary error theory within the broader framework of the relationship between folk conceptions of a domain and our best scientific conception of that same domain; within that broader framework, argue that (...)
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  7.  37
    Kim Sterelny, Richard Joyce, Brett Calcott & Ben Fraser (eds.) (2013). Cooperation and its Evolution. MIT Press.
    This collection reports on the latest research on an increasingly pivotal issue for evolutionary biology: cooperation. The chapters are written from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and utilize research tools that range from empirical survey to conceptual modeling, reflecting the rich diversity of work in the field. They explore a wide taxonomic range, concentrating on bacteria, social insects, and, especially, humans. -/- Part I (“Agents and Environments”) investigates the connections of social cooperation in social organizations to the conditions that make (...)
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  8. Michael Devitt & Kim Sterelny (1999). Language and Reality. John Wiley & Sons.
    Completely revised and updated in its Second Edition, _Language and Reality_ provides students, philosophers and cognitive scientists with a lucid and provocative introduction to the philosophy of language.
     
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  9. Kim Sterelny & Philip Kitcher (1988). The Return of the Gene. Journal of Philosophy 85 (7):339-361.
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  10.  73
    Kim Sterelny, Kelly C. Smith & Michael Dickison (1996). The Extended Replicator. Biology and Philosophy 11 (3):377-403.
    This paper evaluates and criticises the developmental systems conception of evolution and develops instead an extension of the gene's eye conception of evolution. We argue (i) Dawkin's attempt to segregate developmental and evolutionary issues about genes is unsatisfactory. On plausible views of development it is arbitrary to single out genes as the units of selection. (ii) The genotype does not carry information about the phenotype in any way that distinguishes the role of the genes in development from that other factors. (...)
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  11.  44
    Philip Kitcher, Kim Sterelny & C. Kenneth Waters (1990). The Illusory Riches of Sober's Monism. Journal of Philosophy 87 (3):158-161.
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  12. Gregory Currie & Kim Sterelny (2000). How to Think About the Modularity of Mind-Reading. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (199):145-160.
  13. Kim Sterelny (2004). Externalism, Epistemic Artefacts and the Extended Mind. In Richard Schantz (ed.), The Externalist Challenge. De Gruyter 239--254.
    A common picture of evolution by natural selection sees it as a process through which organisms change so that they become better adapted to their environment. However, agents do not merely respond to the challenges their environments pose. They modify their environments, filtering and transforming the action of the environment on their bodies A beaver, in making a dam, engineers a stream, increasing both the size of its safe refuge and reducing its seasonal variability. Beavers, like many other animals, are (...)
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  14. Kim Sterelny, Paul E. Griffiths, David L. Hull, Michael Ruse & Jane Maienschein (2000). Sex and Death: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Biology. Journal of the History of Biology 33 (1):181-187.
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  15. Kim Sterelny (2007). Social Intelligence, Human Intelligence and Niche Construction. In Nathan Emery, Nicola Clayton & Chris Frith (eds.), Social Intelligence: From Brain to Culture. OUP Oxford
  16.  15
    Brett Calcott & Kim Sterelny (eds.) (2011). The Major Transitions in Evolution Revisited. MIT Press.
    Drawing on recent advances in evolutionary biology, prominent scholars return to the question posed in a pathbreaking book: how evolution itself evolved.
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  17. Kim Sterelny (2000). The "Genetic Program" Program: A Commentary on Maynard Smith on Information in Biology. Philosophy of Science 67 (2):195-201.
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  18.  85
    Kim Sterelny (2006). The Evolution and Evolvability of Culture. Mind and Language 21 (2):137-165.
    Joseph Henrich and Richard McElreath begin their survey of theories of cultural evolution with a striking historical example. They contrast the fate of the Bourke and Wills expedition — an attempt to explore some of the arid areas of inland Australia — with the routine survival of the local aboriginals in exactly the same area. That expedition ended in failure and death, despite the fact that it was well equipped, and despite the fact that those on the expedition were tough (...)
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  19.  96
    Kim Sterelny (2006). Memes Revisited. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (1):145-165.
    In this paper, I argue that the adaptive fit between human cultures and their environment is persuasive evidence that some form of evolutionary mechanism has been important in driving human cultural change. I distinguish three mechanisms of cultural evolution: niche construction leading to cultural group selection; the vertical flow of cultural information from parents to their children, and the replication and spread of memes. I further argue that both cultural group selection and the vertical flow of cultural information have been (...)
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  20. Kim Sterelny (2010). Moral Nativism: A Sceptical Response. Mind and Language 25 (3):279-297.
    In the last few years, nativist, modular views of moral cognition have been influential. This paper shares the view that normative cognition develops robustly, and is probably an adaptation. But it develops an alternative view of the developmental basis of moral cognition, based on the idea that adults scaffold moral development by organising the learning environment of the next generation. In addition, I argue that the modular nativist picture has no plausible account of the role of explicit moral judgement, and (...)
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  21.  7
    Kim Sterelny (2008). Thought in a Hostile World: The Evolution of Human Cognition. Wiley-Blackwell.
    __WINNER OF THE 2004 LAKATOS AWARD!__ _Thought in a Hostile World_ is an exploration of the evolution of cognition, especially human cognition, by one of today's foremost philosophers of biology and of mind. Featuresan exploration of the evolution of human cognition. Written by one of today’s foremost philosophers of mind and language. Presents a set of analytic tools for thinking about cognition and its evolution. Offers a critique of nativist, modular versions of evolutionary psychology, rejecting the example of language as (...)
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  22.  89
    Kim Sterelny (2011). Darwinian Spaces: Peter Godfrey-Smith on Selection and Evolution. Biology and Philosophy 26 (4):489-500.
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  23. Kim Sterelny (2005). Made by Each Other: Organisms and Their Environment. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 20 (1):21-36.
    The standard picture of evolution, is externalist: a causal arrow runs from environment to organism, and that arrow explains why organisms are as they are (Godfrey-Smith 1996). Natural selection allows a lineage to accommodate itself to the specifics of its environment. As the interior of Australia became hotter and drier, phenotypes changed in many lineages of plants and animals, so that those organisms came to suit the new conditions under which they lived. Odling-Smee, Laland and Feldman, building on the work (...)
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  24.  57
    Kim Sterelny (1996). Explanatory Pluralism in Evolutionary Biology. Biology and Philosophy 11 (2):193-214.
    The ontological dependence of one domain on another is compatible with the explanatory autonomy of the less basic domain. That autonomy results from the fact that the relationship between two domains can be very complex. In this paper I distinguish two different types of complexity, two ways the relationship between domains can fail to be transparent, both of which are relevant to evolutionary biology. Sometimes high level explanations preserve a certain type of causal or counterfactual information which would be lost (...)
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  25.  17
    Kim Sterelny (2013). The Evolved Apprentice Model: Scope and Limits. [REVIEW] Biological Theory 8 (1):37-43.
    Downes, Gerrans, and Sutton all raise important issues for the account of human social learning and cooperation developed in The Evolved Apprentice. Downes suggests that I have bought too uncritically into the view that hunting was economically critical to forager life; I remain unpersuaded, while conceding something to the alternative view that hunting was signaling. Downes also suggests that I consider extending the evolved apprentice model to contemporary issues in social epistemology; I wonder whether that might make the model so (...)
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  26.  22
    Kim Sterelny (2014). A Paleolithic Reciprocation Crisis: Symbols, Signals, and Norms. Biological Theory 9 (1):65-77.
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  27.  72
    Kim Sterelny (1996). The Return of the Group. Philosophy of Science 63 (4):562-584.
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  28.  13
    Frank Jackson, Jesse J. Prinz, Ernest Sosa & Kim Sterelny (2009). Viii Notes on Contributors Alvin Goldman is Board of Governors Professor of Philosophy and Cognitive Science at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. His Principal Research Areas Are Episte-Mology, Philosophy of Mind, and Cognitive Science. His Most Recent Book is Simulating Minds (2006). [REVIEW] In Michael Bishop & Dominic Murphy (eds.), Stich and His Critics. Blackwell
  29.  5
    Kim Sterelny (2012). Morality’s Dark Past. Analyse & Kritik 34 (1):95-115.
    Philip Kitcher’s The Ethical Project tries to vindicates ethics through an analysis of its evolutionary and cultural history, a history which in turn, he thinks, supports a particular conception of the role of moral thinking and normative practices in human social life. As Kitcher sees it, that role could hardly be more central: most of what makes human life human, and preferable to the fraught and impoverished societies of the great apes, depends on moral cognition. From this view of the (...)
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  30.  92
    Kim Sterelny, Symbiosis, Evolvability and Modularity.
    This paper explores the connections between inheritance systems, evolvability and modularity. I argue that the transmission of symbiotic micro-organisms is an inheritance system, and one that is evolutionarily significant because symbionts generate biologically crucial aspects of their hosts’ organisation through modular developmental pathways. More specifically, I develop and defend five theses.
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  31.  35
    Kim Sterelny (2000). Development, Evolution, and Adaptation. Philosophy of Science 67 (3):387.
    In this paper I develop three conceptions of the relationship between evolutionary and developmental biology. I further argue that: (a) the choice between them largely turns on as yet unresolved empirical considerations; (b) none of these conceptions demand a fundamental conceptual reevaluation of evolutionary biology; and (c) while developmental systems theorists have constructed an important and innovative alternative to the standard view of the genotype/phenotype relations, in considering the general issue of the relationship between evolutionary and developmental biology, we can (...)
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  32. Kim Sterelny (2001). Dawkins Vs. Gould Survival of the Fittest.
     
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  33.  48
    Massimo Pigliucci, Kim Sterelny & Werner Callebaut (2013). The Meaning of “Theory” in Biology. Biological Theory 7 (4):285-286.
    The articles in this issue reflect the results of the 25th Altenberg Workshop in Theoretical Biology on ‘‘The Meaning of ‘Theory’ in Biology’’ held at the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research, Altenberg, Austria, 30 June–3 July, 2011.
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  34.  23
    Kim Sterelny (2006). Local Ecological Communities. Philosophy of Science 73 (2):215-231.
  35.  18
    Kim Sterelny (2015). A Natural History of Human Thinking by Michael Tomasello. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 69 (1):156-158.
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  36.  4
    Kim Sterelny (2016). Cooperation, Culture, and Conflict. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 67 (1):31-58.
    In this article I develop a big picture of the evolution of human cooperation, and contrast it to an alternative based on group selection. The crucial claim is that hominin history has seen two major transitions in cooperation, and hence poses two deep puzzles about the origins and stability of cooperation. The first is the transition from great ape social lives to the lives of Pleistocene cooperative foragers; the second is the stability of the social contract through the early Holocene (...)
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  37.  38
    Kim Sterelny (2007). SNAFUS: An Evolutionary Perspective. Biological Theory 2 (3):317-328.
    Human cultural life is replete with examples of adaptations to the social, physical, and biological environments that have been built gradually, cumulatively, by hidden-hand mechanisms. The impressive technologies, natural history databases, and exchange networks of traditional peoples have been built in this way. But the ethnological record is also replete with evidence of maladaptive beliefs and practices, and of failures to adapt to changing circumstances. This paper is about such failures. In what ways is cultural evolution constrained, and what explains (...)
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  38.  61
    Kim Sterelny (2006). Folk Logic and Animal Rationality. In Susan L. Hurley & Matthew Nudds (eds.), Rational Animals? OUP
    It is indeed important to identify the rich variety of systems for the adaptive control of behaviour, rather than squeezing this richness into a few boxes. We need to recognise both the variety of systems for the cognitive control of adaptive behaviour and to chart the relationships between such systems. But I shall argue that these projects are not best pursued by asking about the extent of animal rationality. The argument develops in three stages. The first outlines a picture of (...)
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  39. Kim Sterelny (1981). Critical Notice. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 59 (4):442 – 453.
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  40.  44
    Kim Sterelny (1995). The Adapted Mind. Biology and Philosophy 10 (3):365-380.
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  41. Kim Sterelny (1983). Natural Kinds Terms. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 64 (2):100-125.
     
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  42.  59
    Kim Sterelny (1989). Fodor's Nativism. Philosophical Studies 55 (February):119-41.
  43. Peter Godfrey-Smith & Kim Sterelny (2007). Biological Information. In Thaddeus Metz (ed.), Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  44. Kim Sterelny (1986). The Imagery Debate. Philosophy of Science 53 (December):560-83.
    One central debate in cognitive science is over imagery. Do images constitute, or constitute evidence for, a distinctive, depictive form of mental representation? The most sophisticated advocacy of this view has been developed by Kosslyn and his coworkers. This paper focuses on his position and argues (i) that though Kosslyn has not developed a satisfactory account of depiction, there is nothing in principle unintelligible about the idea of depictive neural representation, but (ii) Kosslyn's model of imagery rescues the intelligibility of (...)
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  45.  11
    Kim Sterelny (2013). Cooperation in a Complex World: The Role of Proximate Factors in Ultimate Explanations. [REVIEW] Biological Theory 7 (4):358-367.
    Mayr’s distinction between proximate and ultimate explanation is justly famous, marking out a division of explanatory labor in biology. But while it is a useful heuristic in many cases, there are others in which proximate factors play an important role in shaping evolutionary trajectories, and in such cases, each project is sensitive to, and relevant to, the other. This general methodological claim is developed in the context of a discussion of human cooperation, and in particular, in a discussion on the (...)
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  46.  34
    Kim Sterelny (2005). Another View of Life. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 36 (3):585-593.
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  47.  42
    Kim Sterelny (1995). Basic Minds. Philosophical Perspectives 9:251-70.
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  48. Kim Sterelny (1995). Understanding Life: Recent Work in Philosophy of Biology. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 46 (2):155-183.
    This paper surveys recent philosophy of biology. It aims to introduce outsiders to the field to the recent literature (which is reviewed in the footnotes) and the main recent debates. I concentrate on three of these: recent critiques of the replicator/vehicle distinction and its application to the idea of the gene as the unit of section; the recent defences of group selection and the idea that standard alternatives to group selection are in fact no more than a disguised form of (...)
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  49.  34
    Kim Sterelny (1994). Science and Selection. Biology and Philosophy 9 (1):45-62.
    In this paper I consider the view that scientific change is the result of a selection process which has the same structure as that which drives natural selection. I argue that there are important differences between organic evolution and scientific growth. First, natural selection is much more constrained than scientific change; for example it is hard to populations of organisms to escape local maxima. Science progresses; it may not even make sense to say that biological evolution is progressive. Second, natural (...)
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  50.  20
    Kim Sterelny (2011). Civilizing Cooperation: Paul Seabright and the Company of Strangers. Biological Theory 6 (2):120-126.
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