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Margaret Urban Walker [101]Mark Walker [73]Matthew Walker [14]Mark Thomas Walker [14]
Melanie Walker [9]M. Walker [7]Michelle Boulous Walker [7]Mary Jean Walker [6]

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See also:
Profile: Mark Thomas Walker (University of Birmingham)
Profile: Mark Walker
Profile: Mark Alan Walker (New Mexico State University)
Profile: Mary Jean Walker (Monash University)
Profile: Michael Walker (Oxford University)
Profile: Marissa Walker (University of Nevada, Las Vegas)
Profile: Marilyn Walker (Georgetown University)
Profile: Michael Walker
Profile: Marie Walker (Ashford University)
Profile: Mitchell Walker (Utah State University)
  1.  16
    Margaret Urban Walker (2006). Moral Repair: Reconstructing Moral Relations After Wrongdoing. Cambridge.
    1. What. Is. Moral. Repair? A woman is at home in an isolated house by the sea. It is night, and she sits on the terrace. When a car turns in toward the house, the woman gets a gun. When she hears her husband's voice, she puts the gun away  ...
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  2. Margaret Urban Walker (2007). Moral Understandings: A Feminist Study in Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This is a revised edition of Walker's well-known book in feminist ethics first published in 1997. Walker's book proposes a view of morality and an approach to ethical theory which uses the critical insights of feminism and race theory to rethink the epistemological and moral position of the ethical theorist, and how moral theory is inescapably shaped by culture and history. The main gist of her book is that morality is embodied in "practices of responsibility" that express our identities, values, (...)
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  3.  11
    Mary Jean Walker, Wendy A. Rogers & Vikki Entwistle (2014). Ethical Justifications for Access to Unapproved Medical Interventions: An Argument for (Limited) Patient Obligations. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (11):3-15.
    Many health care systems include programs that allow patients in exceptional circumstances to access medical interventions of as yet unproven benefit. In this article we consider the ethical justifications for?and demands on?these special access programs (SAPs). SAPs have a compassionate basis: They give patients with limited options the opportunity to try interventions that are not yet approved by standard regulatory processes. But while they signal that health care systems can and will respond to individual suffering, SAPs have several disadvantages, including (...)
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  4. Margaret Urban Walker (1998). Moral Understandings: A Feminist Study In. In Stephen Everson (ed.), Ethics. Cambridge University Press
     
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  5.  3
    Hilde Lindemann, Marian Verkerk & Margaret Urban Walker (eds.) (2009). Naturalized Bioethics: Toward Responsible Knowing and Practice. Cambridge University Press.
    Naturalized Bioethics represents a revolutionary change in how health care ethics is practiced. It calls for bioethicists to give up their dependence on utilitarianism and other ideal moral theories and instead to move toward a self-reflexive, socially inquisitive, politically critical, and inclusive ethics. Wary of idealizations that bypass social realities, the naturalism in ethics that is developed in this volume is empirically nourished and acutely aware that ethical theory is the practice of particular people in particular times, places, cultures, and (...)
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  6. Sandra Lee Bartky, Paul Benson, Sue Campbell, Claudia Card, Robin S. Dillon, Jean Harvey, Karen Jones, Charles W. Mills, James Lindemann Nelson, Margaret Urban Walker, Rebecca Whisnant & Catherine Wilson (2004). Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Moral psychology studies the features of cognition, judgement, perception and emotion that make human beings capable of moral action. Perspectives from feminist and race theory immensely enrich moral psychology. Writers who take these perspectives ask questions about mind, feeling, and action in contexts of social difference and unequal power and opportunity. These essays by a distinguished international cast of philosophers explore moral psychology as it connects to social life, scientific studies, and literature.
     
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  7.  64
    Mark D. Groza, Mya R. Pronschinske & Matthew Walker (2011). Perceived Organizational Motives and Consumer Responses to Proactive and Reactive CSR. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (4):639-652.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has emerged as an effective way for firms to create favorable attitudes among consumers. Although prior research has addressed the direct influence of proactive and reactive CSR on consumer responses, this research hypothesized that consumers’ perceived organizational motives (i.e., attributions) will mediate this relationship. It was also hypothesized that the source of information and location of CSR initiative will affect the motives consumers assign to a firms’ engagement in the initiative. Two experiments were conducted to test (...)
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  8.  1
    Margaret Urban Walker (2002). Moral Contexts. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    To be truly reflective, moral thinking and moral philosophy must become aware of the contexts that bind our thinking about how to live. These essays show how to do this, and why it makes a difference.
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  9.  19
    Melanie Walker (2006). Higher Education Pedagogies: A Capabilities Approach. Open University Press.
    This book sets out to generate new ways of reflecting ethically about the purposes and values of contemporary higher education in relation to agency, learning, public values and democratic life, and the pedagogies which support these.
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  10.  5
    Sandra Lee Bartky, Daniel Callahan, Joan C. Callahan, Peggy DesAutels, Robin Fiore, Frida Kerner Furman, Martha Holstein, Diana Tietjens Meyers, Hilde Lindemann Nelson, James Lindemann Nelson, Sara Ruddick, Anita Silvers, Joan Tronto, Margaret Urban Walker & Susan Wendell (eds.) (2000). Mother Time: Women, Aging, and Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Fifteen original essays open up a novel area of inquiry: the distinctively ethical dimensions of women's experiences of and in aging. Contributors distinguished in the fields of feminist ethics and the ethics of aging explore assumptions, experiences, practices, and public policies that affect women's well-being and dignity in later life. The book brings to the study of women's aging a reflective dimension missing from the empirical work that has predominated to date. Ethical studies of aging have so far failed to (...)
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  11. Joan Tronto, Nel Noddings, Eloise Buker, Selma Sevenhuijsen, Vivienne Bozalek, Amanda Gouws, Marie Minnaar-Mcdonald, Deborah Little, Margaret Urban Walker, Fiona Robinson, Judith Stadtman Tucker & Cheryl Brandsen (2006). Socializing Care: Feminist Ethics and Public Issues. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Contributors to this volume demonstrate how the ethics of care factors into a variety of social policies and institutions, and can indeed be useful in thinking about a number of different social problems. Divided into two sections, the first looks at care as a model for an evaluative framework that rethinks social institutions, liberal society, and citizenship at a basic conceptual level. The second explores care values in the context of specific social practices or settings, as a framework that should (...)
     
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  12.  10
    Catriona Mackenzie & Mary Walker, Neurotechnologies, Personal Identity and the Ethics of Authenticity.
    In the recent neuroethics literature, there has been vigorous debate concerning the ethical implications of the use of neurotechnologies that may alter a person’s identity. Much of this debate has been framed around the concept of authenticity. The argument of this chapter is that the ethics of authenticity, as applied to neurotechnological treatment or enhancement, is conceptually misleading. The notion of authenticity is ambiguous between two distinct and conflicting conceptions: self-discovery and self-creation. The self-discovery conception of authenticity is based on (...)
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  13.  3
    Merridy Wilson-Strydom & Melanie Walker (2015). A Capabilities-Friendly Conceptualisation of Flourishing in and Through Education. Journal of Moral Education 44 (3):310-324.
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  14.  9
    Matthew Walker, Bob Heere, Milena M. Parent & Dan Drane (2010). Social Responsibility and the Olympic Games: The Mediating Role of Consumer Attributions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):659 - 680.
    Current literature suggests that corporate social responsibility (CSR) can affect consumers' attitudes towards an organization and is regarded as a driver for reputation-building and fostering sustained consumer patronage. Although prior research has addressed the direct influence of CSR on consumer responses, this research examined the mediating influence of consumer's perceived organizational motives within an NGO setting.Given the heightened public attention surrounding the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, data were collected from consumers of the Games to assess their perceptions of the International (...)
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  15.  18
    Mark Walker (2016). Externalism, Skepticism, and Skeptical Dogmatism. Journal of Philosophy 113 (1):27-57.
    A claimed benefit of epistemic externalism is that it alone can avoid skepticism. Most epistemic externalists, however, allow a residual amount of internalism in terms of a defeasibility condition. The paper argues that this internal condition is sufficient for skeptics to cast doubt on many claims to justified belief about perceptual matters about the world. Furthermore, the internal defeasibility condition also opens the door to a darker form of skepticism; skeptical dogmatism, which maintains that many of our perceptually based beliefs (...)
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  16.  3
    Margaret Urban Walker (1993). Keeping Moral Space Open: New Images of Ethics Consulting. Hastings Center Report 23 (2):33-40.
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  17.  73
    Matthew P. Walker (2005). A Refined Model of Sleep and the Time Course of Memory Formation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):51-64.
    Research in the neurosciences continues to provide evidence that sleep plays a role in the processes of learning and memory. There is less of a consensus, however, regarding the precise stages of memory development during which sleep is considered a requirement, simply favorable, or not important. This article begins with an overview of recent studies regarding sleep and learning, predominantly in the procedural memory domain, and is measured against our current understanding of the mechanisms that govern memory formation. Based on (...)
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  18.  6
    Matthew Walker & Aubrey Kent (2013). The Roles of Credibility and Social Consciousness in the Corporate Philanthropy-Consumer Behavior Relationship. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):341-353.
    The attention paid to the influence of organizational philanthropy on consumer responses has precipitated a shift in the role this practice plays in organizational dynamics—with philanthropy becoming an increasingly strategic marketing tool. The authors develop and test a model predicting that: (1) perceived organizational credibility will mediate the relationship between awareness of philanthropy and the outcomes of advocacy and financial sacrifice; (2) consumer social consciousness will moderate the relationship between awareness of philanthropy and firm credibility, and between credibility and the (...)
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  19.  28
    Margaret Urban Walker (1989). Moral Understandings: Alternative "Epistemology" for a Feminist Ethics. Hypatia 4 (2):15 - 28.
    Work on representing women's voices in ethics has produced a vision of moral understanding profoundly subversive of the traditional philosophical conception of moral knowledge. I explicate this alternative moral "epistemology," identify how it challenges the prevailing view, and indicate some of its resources for a liberatory feminist critique of philosophical ethics.
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  20.  32
    Margaret Urban Walker (2005). Diotima's Ghost: The Uncertain Place of Feminist Philosophy in Professional Philosophy. Hypatia 20 (3):153-165.
  21.  23
    Mark Thomas Walker (2014). The Real Reason Why the Prisoner's Dilemma is Not a Newcomb Problem. Philosophia 42 (3):841-859.
  22.  11
    Margaret Urban Walker (2013). Moral Vulnerability and the Task of Reparations. In Catriona Mackenzie, Wendy Rogers & Susan Dodds (eds.), Vulnerability: New Essays in Ethics and Feminist Philosophy. OUP Usa
    This essay seeks to understand the domain and demands of reparative justice in terms of moral vulnerability. Significant harms raise the question of whether victims stand in truly reciprocal practices of accountability; if they do, they enjoy the power of calling others to account as well as bearing the liability of being accountable to others. In the aftermath of harms, victims’ moral vulnerability is tested: they may be exposed to the insult and injury of discovering that they do not enjoy (...)
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  23.  1
    Margaret Urban Walker (2005). Diotima's Ghost: The Uncertain Place of Feminist Philosophy in Professional Philosophy. Hypatia 20 (3):153-164.
  24. Margaret Urban Walker (1991). Moral Luck and the Virtues of Impure Agency. Metaphilosophy 22 (1-2):14-27.
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  25.  20
    Haylee Uecker-Mercado & Matthew Walker (2012). The Value of Environmental Social Responsibility to Facility Managers: Revealing the Perceptions and Motives for Adopting ESR. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 110 (3):269-284.
    This study is grounded in the debate surrounding the perceived value of environmental social responsibility (ESR). Applying the Managerial Theory of the Firm, in-depth interviews were conducted to identify managerial motives, perceptions, and perceived value of ESR. Using sport and public assembly facilities as the research context, environmentally responsible information was obtained from facility managers who were members of the International Association of Venue Managers. In total, 15 one-hour, interviews with key facility personnel demonstrate that (1) internal stakeholder pressure, (2) (...)
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  26.  37
    Robert Stickgold & Matthew Walker (2004). To Sleep, Perchance to Gain Creative Insight? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (5):191-192.
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  27.  6
    Margaret Urban Walker, Feminist Skepticism, Authority, and Transparency.
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  28.  71
    Margaret Urban Walker (2006). Restorative Justice and Reparations. Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (3):377–395.
  29. Melanie Walker (2010). Critical Capability Pedagogies and University Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (8):898-917.
    The article argues for an alliance of the capability approach developed by Amartya Sen with ideas from critical pedagogy for undergraduate university education which develops student agency and well being on the one hand, and social change towards greater justice on the other. The purposes of a university education in this article are taken to include both intrinsic and instrumental purposes and to therefore include personal development, economic opportunities and becoming educated citizens. Core ideas from the capability approach are outlined, (...)
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  30. Margaret Urban Walker (1997). Moral Understandings: A Feminist Study in Ethics. Routledge.
    First published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  31.  18
    Mark Walker (2014). Eugenic Selection Benefits Embryos. Bioethics 28 (5):214-224.
    The primary question to be addressed here is whether pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), used for both negative and positive trait selection, benefits potential supernumerary embryos. The phrase ‘potential supernumerary embryos’ is used to indicate that PGD is typically performed on a set of embryos, only some of which will be implanted. Prior to any testing, each embryo in the set is potentially supernumerary in the sense that it may not be selected for implantation. Those embryos that are not selected, and (...)
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  32.  29
    Mark Walker (2014). Occam’s Razor, Dogmatism, Skepticism, and Skeptical Dogmatism. New Content is Available for International Journal for the Study of Skepticism.
    _ Source: _Page Count 29 Underdetermination arguments for skepticism maintain that our common sense view of the external world is no better, evidentially speaking, than some skeptical competitors. An important and well-known response by dogmatists, those who believe our commonsense view is justified, appeals to abduction or inference to the best explanation. The predominant version of this strategy, going back at least to Locke, invokes Occam’s razor: dogmatists claim the common sense view is simpler than any of its skeptical alternatives (...)
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  33.  15
    Mark Walker (2016). Occam’s Razor, Dogmatism, Skepticism, and Skeptical Dogmatism. International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 6 (1):1-29.
    _ Source: _Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 1 - 29 Underdetermination arguments for skepticism maintain that our common sense view of the external world is no better, evidentially speaking, than some skeptical competitors. An important and well-known response by dogmatists, those who believe our commonsense view is justified, appeals to abduction OR inference to the best explanation. The predominant version of this strategy, going back at least to Locke, invokes Occam’s razor: dogmatists claim the common sense view is simpler than (...)
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  34. Mark A. Walker & M. Milan (2006). Astrophysical Fine Tuning, Naturalism, and the Contemporary Design Argument. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 20 (3):285 – 307.
    Evidence for instances of astrophysical 'fine tuning' (or 'coincidences') is thought by some to lend support to the design argument (i.e. the argument that our universe has been designed by some deity). We assess some of the relevant empirical and conceptual issues. We argue that astrophysical fine tuning calls for some explanation, but this explanation need not appeal to the design argument. A clear and strict separation of the issue of anthropic fine tuning on one hand and any form of (...)
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  35.  96
    Margaret Urban Walker (2002). Morality in Practice: A Response to Claudia Card and Lorraine Code. Hypatia 17 (1):174-182.
    : I briefly reprise a few themes of my bookMoral Understandingsin order to address some questions about responsibility and justification. I argue for a thoroughly situated and naturalized view of moral justification that warns us not to take moral universalism too easily at face value. I also argue for the significance of reports of experience, among other kinds of empirical evidence, in testing the habitability of moral forms of life.
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  36. Mary Jean Walker, Wendy A. Rogers & Vikki Entwistle (2014). Special Access Programs Warrant Further Critical Attention: Authors' Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Ethical Justifications for Access to Unapproved Medical Interventions: An Argument for (Limited) Patient Obligations”. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (11):W1 - W2.
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  37.  33
    Margaret Urban Walker (1991). Partial Consideration. Ethics 101 (4):758-774.
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  38.  22
    Margaret Urban Walker (1992). Feminism, Ethics, and the Question of Theory. Hypatia 7 (3):23 - 38.
    Feminist discussions of ethics in the Western philosophical tradition range from critiques of the substance of dominant moral theories to critiques of the very practice of "doing ethics" itself. I argue that these critiques really target a certain historically specific model of ethics and moral theory-a "theoretical-juridical" one. I outline an "expressive-collaborative" conception of morality and ethics that could be a politically self-conscious and reflexively critical alternative.
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  39.  67
    Mark Walker (2009). The Anthropic Argument Against the Existence of God. Sophia 48 (4):351 - 378.
    If God is morally perfect then He must perform the morally best actions, but creating humans is not the morally best action. If this line of reasoning can be maintained then the mere fact that humans exist contradicts the claim that God exists. This is the ‘anthropic argument’. The anthropic argument, is related to, but distinct from, the traditional argument from evil. The anthropic argument forces us to consider the ‘creation question’: why did God not create other gods rather than (...)
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  40.  4
    Patricia Masterson-Algar, Christopher R. Burton, Jo Rycroft-Malone, Catherine M. Sackley & Marion F. Walker (2014). Towards a Programme Theory for Fidelity in the Evaluation of Complex Interventions. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (4):445-452.
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  41.  25
    Peggy DesAutels & Margaret Urban Walker (eds.) (2004). Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield.
    These essays by a distinguished international cast of philosophers explore moral psychology as it connects to social life, scientific studies, and literature.
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  42.  27
    Matthew Walker (2010). The Utility of Contemplation in Aristotle's Protrepticus. Ancient Philosophy 30 (1):135-153.
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  43.  21
    Mark Walker (2014). Occam’s Razor, Dogmatism, Skepticism, and Skeptical Dogmatism. Brill.
    _ Source: _Page Count 29 Underdetermination arguments for skepticism maintain that our common sense view of the external world is no better, evidentially speaking, than some skeptical competitors. An important and well-known response by dogmatists, those who believe our commonsense view is justified, appeals to abduction or inference to the best explanation. The predominant version of this strategy, going back at least to Locke, invokes Occam’s razor: dogmatists claim the common sense view is simpler than any of its skeptical alternatives (...)
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  44.  13
    Wendy A. Rogers & Mary J. Walker (2016). Fragility, Uncertainty, and Healthcare. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (1):71-83.
    Medicine seeks to overcome one of the most fundamental fragilities of being human, the fragility of good health. No matter how robust our current state of health, we are inevitably susceptible to future illness and disease, while current disease serves to remind us of various frailties inherent in the human condition. This article examines the relationship between fragility and uncertainty with regard to health, and argues that there are reasons to accept rather than deny at least some forms of uncertainty. (...)
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  45.  32
    Mark Thomas Walker (1996). The Voluntariness of Judgment. Inquiry 39 (1):97 – 119.
    While various items closely associated with belief, such as speech?acts of assertion, or what have recently been termed acts of ?acceptance?, can clearly be voluntary, it is commonly supposed that belief itself, being intrinsically truth?directed, is essentially passive. I argue that while this may be true of belief proper, understood as a kind of disposition, it is not true of acts of assent or ?judgment?. Judgments, I contend, must be deemed voluntary precisely because of their truth?aimedness, for in their case (...)
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  46.  12
    Mary Jean Walker (2012). Neuroscience, Self-Understanding, and Narrative Truth. AJOB Neuroscience 3 (4):63-74.
    Recent evidence from the neurosciences and cognitive sciences provides some support for a narrative theory of self-understanding. However, it also suggests that narrative self-understanding is unlikely to be accurate, and challenges its claims to truth. This article examines a range of this empirical evidence, explaining how it supports a narrative theory of self-understanding while raising questions of these narrative's accuracy and veridicality. I argue that this evidence does not provide sufficient reason to dismiss the possibility of truth in narrative self-understanding. (...)
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  47.  2
    Mary Jean Walker & Wendy Rogers (forthcoming). Defining Disease in the Context of Overdiagnosis. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy.
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  48.  39
    Mark A. Walker & Milan M. Ćirković (2006). Astrophysical Fine Tuning, Naturalism, and the Contemporary Design Argument. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 20 (3):285-307.
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  49.  28
    Mary Walker & Cynthia Townley (2012). Contract Cheating: A New Challenge for Academic Honesty? [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (1):27-44.
    ‘Contract cheating’ has recently emerged as a form of academic dishonesty. It involves students contracting out their coursework to writers in order to submit the purchased assignments as their own work, usually via the internet. This form of cheating involves epistemic and ethical problems that are continuous with older forms of cheating, but which it also casts in a new form. It is a concern to educators because it is very difficult to detect, because it is arguably more fraudulent than (...)
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  50.  67
    Mary Jean Walker (2010). Addiction and Self-Deception: A Method for Self-Control? Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (3):305-319.
    Neil Levy argues that while addicts who believe they are not addicts are self-deceived, addicts who believe they are addicts are just as self-deceived. Such persons accept a false belief that their addictive behaviour involves a loss of control. This paper examines two implications of Levy's discussion: that accurate self-knowledge may be particularly difficult for addicts; and that an addict's self-deceived belief that they cannot control themselves may aid their attempts at self-control. I argue that the self-deceived beliefs of addicts (...)
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