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  1. Berit Åberg (2008). Explanations of Internal Sex Segregation in a Male Dominated Profession : The Police Force. In Anna G. Jónasdóttir & Kathleen B. Jones (eds.), The Political Interests of Gender Revisited: Redoing Theory and Research with a Feminist Face. United Nations University Press.
  2. Mitchell Aboulafia (1993). Was George Herbert Mead a Feminist? Hypatia 8 (2):145 - 158.
    George Herbert Mead was a dedicated progressive and internationalist who strove to realize his political convictions through participation in numerous civic organizations in Chicago. These convictions informed and were informed by his approach to philosophy. This article addresses the bonds between Mead's philosophy, social psychology, and his support of women's rights through an analysis of a letter he wrote to his daughter-in-law regarding her plans for a career.
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  3. Brooke Ackerly, Alison Ainley, Linda Alcoff, Ellen Armour, Stella Gonzalez Arnal, Margaret Atherton, Amy Baehr, Bat-Ami Bar On, Robert Bernasconi & Carol Bigwood (forthcoming). Thanks to Reviewers 2006. Hypatia.
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  4. Alia Al-Saji (2010). Bodies and Sensings: On the Uses of Husserlian Phenomenology for Feminist Theory. Continental Philosophy Review 43 (1):13-37.
    What does Husserlian phenomenology have to offer feminist theory? More specifically, can we find resources within Husserl’s account of the living body ( Leib ) for the critical feminist project of rethinking embodiment beyond the dichotomies not only of mind/body but also of subject/object and activity/passivity? This essay begins by explicating the reasons for feminist hesitation with respect to Husserlian phenomenology. I then explore the resources that Husserl’s phenomenology of touch and his account of sensings hold for feminist theory. My (...)
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  5. Julia Annas (1976). Plato's "Republic" and Feminism. Philosophy 51 (197):307 - 321.
  6. Louise Antony & Ann E. Cudd (2012). The Mentoring Project. Hypatia 27 (2):461-468.
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  7. Thomas Attig (1976). "Why Are You, a Man, Teaching This Course on the Philosophy of Feminism?". Metaphilosophy 7 (2):155–166.
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  8. Carol Bacchi (2012). Introducing the 'What's the Problem Represented to Be?' Approach. In Angelique Bletsas & Chris Beasley (eds.), Engaging with Carol Bacchi: Strategic Interventions and Exchanges. University of Adelaide Press.
  9. Alison Bailey (1995). Mothering, Diversity and Peace: Comments on Sara Ruddick's Feminist Maternal Peace Politics. Journal of Social Philosophy 26 (1):162-182.
    Sara Ruddick's contemporary philosophical account of mothering reconsiders the maternal arguments used in the women's peace movements of the earlier part of this century. The culmination of this project is her 1989 book, Maternal Thinking: Toward a Politics of Peace. Ruddick's project is ground-breaking work in both academic philosophy and feminist theory. -/- In this chapter, I first look at the relationship between the two basic components of Ruddick's argument in Maternal Thinking: the "practicalist conception of truth" (PCT) and feminist (...)
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  10. Alison Bailey & Jacquelyn N. Zita (2007). The Reproduction of Whiteness: Race and the Regulation of the Gendered Body. Hypatia 22 (2).
    Historically critical reflection on whiteness in the United States has been a long-standing practice in slave folklore and in Mexican resistance to colonialism, Asian American struggles against exploitation and containment, and Native American stories of contact with European colonizers. Drawing from this legacy and from the disturbing silence on "whiteness" in postsecondary institutions, critical whiteness scholarship has emerged in the past two decades in U.S. academies in a variety of disciplines. A small number of philosophers, critical race theorists, postcolonial theorists, (...)
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  11. Sandra Lee Bartky, Marilyn Friedman, William Harper, Alison M. Jaggar, Richard H. Miller, Abigail L. Rosenthal, Naomi Scheman, Nancy Tuana, Steven Yates, Christina Sommers, Philip E. Devine, Harry Deutsch, Michael Kelly & Charles L. Reid (1992). Letters to the Editor. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 65 (7):55 - 90.
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  12. Seyla Benhabib (ed.) (1995). Feminist Contentions: A Philosophical Exchange. Routledge.
    This unique volume presents a debate between four of the top feminist theorists in the US today, discussing the key questions facing contemporary feminist theory, responding to each other, and distinguishing their views from others.
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  13. Paul Benson (2011). Symposia on Gender, Race and Philosophy. Hypatia 24 (4):26-49.
  14. Susan E. Bernick (1992). Philosophy and Feminism: The Case of Susan Bordo. Hypatia 7 (3):188 - 196.
    In this paper I lay out what I take to be the crucial insights in Susan Bordo's "Feminist Skepticism and the 'Maleness' of Philosophy" and point out some additional difficulties with the skeptical position. I call attention to an ambiguity in the nature or content of the "maleness" of philosophy that Bordo identifies. Finally, I point out that, unlike some feminist skeptics, Bordo never loses sight in her work of women's lived experiences.
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  15. Talia Mae Bettcher, Feminist Perspectives on Trans Issues. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  16. Talia Mae Bettcher & Ann Garry (2007). Call for Papers. Hypatia 22 (3):242-243.
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  17. Emanuela Bianchi (ed.) (1999). Is Feminist Philosophy Philosophy? Northwestern University Press.
    Drawing attention to the vexed relationship between feminist theory and philosophy, Is Feminist Philosophy Philosophy? demonstrates the spectrum of significant work being done at this contested boundary. The volume offers clear statements by seventeen distinguished scholars as well as a full range of philosophical approaches; it also presents feminist philosophers in conversation both as feminists and as philosophers, making the book accessible to a wide audience. -/- Table of Contents -/- Opening plenary: Drucilla Cornell, Jacques Derrida, and Teresa Brennan — (...)
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  18. Jelisaveta Blagojević & Dušan Đorđević Mileusnić (eds.) (2002). Selected Papers: Anniversary Issue. Belgrade Women's Studies Center.
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  19. Cheshire Calhoun (2009). The Undergraduate Pipeline Problem. Hypatia 24 (2):216 - 223.
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  20. Joan Callahan (2010). Greetings From an Unlikely Filmmaker. Hypatia 25 (1):213 - 216.
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  21. Joan Callahan (1996). Symposium: A Roundtable on Feminism and Philosophy in the Mid-1990s: Taking Stock: Introduction. Metaphilosophy 27 (1-2):184-188.
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  22. Lisa Campo-Engelstein (2008). Goodbye Hypatia, My Friend. Hypatia 23 (3):pp. 233-235.
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  23. Claudia Card (2000). Drucilla Cornell, At the Heart of Freedom: Feminism, Sex, and Equality:At the Heart of Freedom: Feminism, Sex, and Equality. Ethics 110 (3):607-609.
  24. Claudia Card (1996). Feminism and Philosophy in the Mid-Nineties: Taking Stock. Metaphilosophy 27 (1-2):193-196.
  25. Patricia Ticineto Clough (1994). Feminist Thought: Desire, Power, and Academic Discourse. Blackwell.
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  26. Sharyn Clough (2004). Book Review: Virginia Valian. Why so Slow? The Advancement of Women. Cambridge: Mit Press, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia 19 (2):150-151.
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  27. Andrew Cohen (2003). Book Review: Mimi Reisel Gladstein and Chris Matthew Sciabarra. Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (3):226-229.
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  28. Catherine Constable (2000). Provocations. Hypatia 15 (2):94-99.
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  29. Drucilla Cornell (2005). The Solace of Resonance. Hypatia 20 (2):215-222.
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  30. Alice Crary (2012). What is Posthumanism? By Cary Wolfe. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2010. Hypatia 27 (3):678-685.
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  31. Jean Curthoys (1997). Feminist Amnesia: The Wake of Women's Liberation. Routledge.
    Feminist Amnesia is an important challenge to contemporary academic feminism. Jean Curthoys argues that the intellectual decline of university arts education and the loss of a deep moral commitment in feminism are related phenomena. The contradiction set up by the radical ideas of the 1960s, and institutionalised life of many of its protagonists in the academy, has produced a special kind of intellectual distortion. This book criticizes current trends in feminist theory from the perspective of forgotten and allegedly outdated feminist (...)
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  32. Nancy Daukas (2011). Altogether Now: A Virtue-Theoretic Approach to Pluralism in Feminist Epistemology In. In Heidi Grasswick (ed.), Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science: Power in Knowledge.
    In this paper I develop and support a feminist virtue epistemology and bring it into conversation with feminist contextual empiricism and feminist standpoint theory. The virtue theory I develop is centered on the virtue of epistemic trustworthiness, which foregrounds the social/political character of knowledge practices and products, and the differences between epistemic agencies that perpetuate, on the one hand, and displace, on the other hand, normative patterns of unjust epistemic discrimination. I argue that my view answers important questions regarding epistemic (...)
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  33. Hilary E. Davis (1994). Pleasure, Pain, and Ethical Responsibility: A Felt-Situated Reading of Menace II Society. In Philosophy of Education.
    This paper posits a feminist aesthetic of reading, ‘re-captivation,’ which accounts for both the reader's pleasure and his/her ethical responsibility. Re-captivation is distinguished by its introspective and ethical characteristics; it is a pleasure informed by the pain of misrecognition, i.e. acknowledgement of one's own complicity in systems of oppression. After a brief explanation of re-captivation, this paper describes my experience viewing the film Menace II Society. Using my paths of identification and emotional response to this film as my data, I (...)
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  34. Jane Duran (2002). Wittgenstein, Feminism and Theory. Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (3):321-336.
    An attempt is made to try to delineate the common ground of feminist concerns and the work of Wittgenstein by alluding to several areas of theory - among them are the orality-literacy distinction, the notion of the universal, and the realm of particulars. I cite portions of both the Tractatus and the Investigations, and utilize the work of commentators such as Anscombe, Fogelin and Genova. The broader argument is that Wittgenstein's turn away from a kind of logical atomism is (...)
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  35. Susan Dwyer (1996). Who's Afraid of Feminism? Dialogue 35 (02):327-.
  36. Therese Boos Dykeman (2004). The Philosophy of Halfness and the Philosophy of Duality: Julia Ward Howe and Ednah Dow Cheney. Hypatia 19 (2):17-34.
    : Julia Ward (1819-1910) and Ednah Dow Littlehale (1824-1904), lifelong friends, wrote and lectured on many of the same issues, traveled across the country to lend support to causes, and taught together at the Concord School of Philosophy. Despite their close association and mutual efforts on similar issues, I argue that their philosophical principles were essentially different, in particular their approaches to an understanding of God, society, the sexes, art, and science.
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  37. Therese Boos Dykeman (ed.) (1999). The Neglected Canon: Nine Women Philosophers: First to the Twentieth Century. Kluwer Academic.
    The outstanding points of The Neglected Canon are that it provides a multicultural anthology of women philosophers: Chinese, European, North and Central American, that it provides a history of women philosophers through selected works from the first century to the beginning of the twentieth century, and that it provides unusual comprehensiveness in its bibliographies, biographies, and introductions to the works. In these three points it offers a more complete text than any yet on the market in this field. Designed for (...)
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  38. Gertrude Ezorsky (1979). Correspondence. Philosophy and Public Affairs 8 (3):296-302.
  39. Nadine Faulkner (2005). Theorizing Backlash: Philosophical Reflections on the Resistance to Feminism. Dialogue 44 (1):201-204.
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  40. Cordelia Fine (2008). Will Working Mothers' Brains Explode? The Popular New Genre of Neurosexism. Neuroethics 1 (1):69-72.
    A number of recent popular books about gender differences have drawn on the neuroscientific literature to support the claim that certain psychological differences between the sexes are ‘hard-wired’. This article highlights some of the ethical implications that arise from both factual and conceptual errors propagated by such books.
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  41. Catherine Villanueva Gardner (2000). Rediscovering Women Philosophers: Philosophical Genre and the Boundaries of Philosophy. Westview.
    This book examines the philosophical foremothers of women’s philosophy and explores what their work may have to offer modern theorizing in feminist ethics. Through such writers as Catharine Macaulay, Mary Wollstonecraft, and George Eliot, Gardner interprets a varied selection of moral philosophers in an attempt both to contribute to our understanding of their work, and perhaps even to encourage other philosophers to interpretive work of their own. She also looks into the reasons such forms as novels, letters, and poetry have (...)
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  42. Anca Gheaus (2014). Three Cheers for the Token Woman! Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (4):n/a-n/a.
    Concerns about the under-representation of female academic philosophers and about the stereotype that philosophy is best done by men have recently led to efforts to make academic philosophy a more inclusive discipline. An example is the Gendered Conference Campaign, encouraging event organisers and volume editors to include women amongst invited speakers and authors. Initiatives such as the GCC raise worries about tokenism. Potential invitees may be concerned about unfairness towards whose who would have been invited in their place in the (...)
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  43. David Golumbia (1997). Rethinking Philosophy in the Third Wave of Feminism. Hypatia 12 (3):100 - 115.
    The influence of feminist theory on philosophy has been less pervasive than it might have been. This is due in part to inherent tensions between feminist critique and the university as an institution, and to philosophy's place in the academy. These tensions, if explored rather than resisted, can result in a revitalized, more explicitly feminist conception of philosophy itself, wherein philosophy is seen as an attempt to rethink the deepest aspects of experience and culture.
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  44. Victoria Grace (2000). Baudrillard's Challenge: A Feminist Reading. Routledge.
    Jean Baudrillard is a pivotal figure in contemporary cultural theory. Without doubt one of the foremost European thinkers of the last fifty years, his work has provoked debate and controversy across a number of disciplines, yet his significance has so far been largely ignored by feminist theorists.
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  45. Lori Gruen & Alison Wylie (2010). Feminist Legacies/Feminist Futures: 25th Anniversary Special Issue—Editors' Introduction. Hypatia 25 (4):725-732.
  46. Hana Havelková (1993). "Patriarchy" in Czech Society. Hypatia 8 (4):89 - 96.
    1948 and 1989 were turning points in Czech society. In forty years under communism, men and women were equalized by the regime's totalitarianism and egalitarianism. I argue that these forces, as well as concomitant changes in the public and private spheres, dictate that women's situation should not be interpreted in terms of patriarchy. Women's issues and the problem of patriarchy, which under communism seemed irrelevant in Czech society, may now come to the fore because the postcommunist period requires women to (...)
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  47. Agnes Hess (2009). Der Verein. Die Philosophin 1 (1):115 - 117.
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  48. Agnes Hess (1990). Feministische Theorie - Philosophie - Universität. Die Philosophin 1 (1):115-117.
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  49. Judith A. Howard & Carolyn Allen (eds.) (2000). Feminisms at a Millennium. University of Chicago Press.
    Last year the editors of Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society invited feminists worldwide to comment on the millennial transition. Representing a disciplinary and generational range of writers, the resulting collection is at turns inspiring, troubling, provocative, despairing, celebratory. Some of the essays give voice to anxieties, others are more hopeful some reflect back, others look forward. Many of these fifty-plus short essays speak to themes of gender, nationality, global independence, transnational corporate domination, racial and ethnic identities, and (...)
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  50. F. M. Kamm (1998). The Noble Warrior: Feminism, Contractarianism, and Self in the Light of Hampton. Philosophical Studies 89 (2-3):237-258.
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