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  1. Berit Åberg (2008). Explanations of Internal Sex Segregation in a Male Dominated Profession : The Police Force. In Anna G. Jónasdóttir & Kathleen B. Jones (eds.), The Political Interests of Gender Revisited: Redoing Theory and Research with a Feminist Face. United Nations University Press
  2. Mitchell Aboulafia (1993). Was George Herbert Mead a Feminist? Hypatia 8 (2):145 - 158.
    George Herbert Mead was a dedicated progressive and internationalist who strove to realize his political convictions through participation in numerous civic organizations in Chicago. These convictions informed and were informed by his approach to philosophy. This article addresses the bonds between Mead's philosophy, social psychology, and his support of women's rights through an analysis of a letter he wrote to his daughter-in-law regarding her plans for a career.
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  3. Liliana Acero (2009). The Commodification of Women's Bodies in Trafficking for Prostitution and Egg Donation. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (1):25-32.
  4. Brooke Ackerly, Alison Ainley, Linda Alcoff, Ellen Armour, Stella Gonzalez Arnal, Margaret Atherton, Amy Baehr, Bat-Ami Bar On, Robert Bernasconi & Carol Bigwood (forthcoming). Thanks to Reviewers 2006. Hypatia.
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  5. Alia Al-Saji (2010). Bodies and Sensings: On the Uses of Husserlian Phenomenology for Feminist Theory. Continental Philosophy Review 43 (1):13-37.
    What does Husserlian phenomenology have to offer feminist theory? More specifically, can we find resources within Husserl’s account of the living body ( Leib ) for the critical feminist project of rethinking embodiment beyond the dichotomies not only of mind/body but also of subject/object and activity/passivity? This essay begins by explicating the reasons for feminist hesitation with respect to Husserlian phenomenology. I then explore the resources that Husserl’s phenomenology of touch and his account of sensings hold for feminist theory. My (...)
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  6. Julia Annas (1976). Plato's "Republic" and Feminism. Philosophy 51 (197):307 - 321.
    Not many philosophers have dealt seriously with the problems of women's rights and status, and those that have, have unfortunately often been on the wrong side. In fact Plato and Mill are the only great philosophers who can plausibly be called feminists. But there has been surprisingly little serious effort made to analyse their arguments; perhaps because it has seemed like going over ground already won.
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  7. Anna Antonopoulos (1991). The Space That Claws and Knaws: Topoi of a Critical Discourse on 'Home'. Dissertation, Concordia University (Canada)
    With the rise of academic interest in objects of inquiry such as 'space', 'the family', 'woman', and 'the child', the discursive circulation of 'home' has seen an equal boom in the production and reproduction of academic texts. However, while the theoretical autonomy of such related concepts as gender, the family, and the household has been challenged, the 'home' as that space within which gendered subjectivity, the family, and the household unfold, remains a kind of unitary vat, an undifferentiated container of (...)
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  8. Louise Antony & Ann E. Cudd (2012). The Mentoring Project. Hypatia 27 (2):461-468.
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  9. Thomas Attig (1976). "Why Are You, a Man, Teaching This Course on the Philosophy of Feminism?". Metaphilosophy 7 (2):155–166.
  10. Carol Bacchi (2012). Introducing the 'What's the Problem Represented to Be?' Approach. In Angelique Bletsas & Chris Beasley (eds.), Engaging with Carol Bacchi: Strategic Interventions and Exchanges. University of Adelaide Press
  11. Alison Bailey & Jacquelyn N. Zita (2007). The Reproduction of Whiteness: Race and the Regulation of the Gendered Body. Hypatia 22 (2):vii-xv.
    Historically critical reflection on whiteness in the United States has been a long-standing practice in slave folklore and in Mexican resistance to colonialism, Asian American struggles against exploitation and containment, and Native American stories of contact with European colonizers. Drawing from this legacy and from the disturbing silence on "whiteness" in postsecondary institutions, critical whiteness scholarship has emerged in the past two decades in U.S. academies in a variety of disciplines. A small number of philosophers, critical race theorists, postcolonial theorists, (...)
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  12. Lawrie Balfour (2005). Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in Du Bois's “Damnation of Women”. Hypatia 20 (3):127-148.
  13. Olive Banks (1985). The Biographical Dictionary of British Feminists.
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  14. Sandra Bartky (1993). Reply to Commentators on Femininity and Domination. Hypatia 8 (1):192-196.
  15. Sandra Lee Bartky, Marilyn Friedman, William Harper, Alison M. Jaggar, Richard H. Miller, Abigail L. Rosenthal, Naomi Scheman, Nancy Tuana, Steven Yates, Christina Sommers, Philip E. Devine, Harry Deutsch, Michael Kelly & Charles L. Reid (1992). Letters to the Editor. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 65 (7):55 - 90.
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  16. Elizabeth Ann Bartlett (1989). Sarah Grimké: Letters on the Equality of the Sexes and Other Essays. Hypatia 4 (1):175-180.
  17. Michelle Bastian (2009). Inventing Nature: Re-Writing Time and Agency in a More-Than-Human World. Australian Humanities Review 47:99-116.
    This paper is a response to Val Plumwoods call for writers to engage in ‘the struggle to think differently’. Specifically, she calls writers to engage in the task of opening up an experience of nature as powerful and as possessing agency. I argue that a critical component of opening up who or what can be understood as possessing agency involves challenging the conception of time as linear, externalised and absolute, particularly in as much as it has guided Western conceptions of (...)
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  18. Erin Beeghly (2015). What is a Stereotype? What is Stereotyping? Hypatia 30 (4):675-691.
    If someone says, “Asians are good at math” or “women are empathetic,” I might interject, “you're stereotyping” in order to convey my disapproval of their utterance. But why is stereotyping wrong? Before we can answer this question, we must better understand what stereotypes are and what stereotyping is. In this essay, I develop what I call the descriptive view of stereotypes and stereotyping. This view is assumed in much of the psychological and philosophical literature on implicit bias and stereotyping, yet (...)
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  19. Mary Field Belenky, Blythe Mcvicker Clinchy, Nancy Rule Goldberger & Jill Mattuck Tarule (1988). Women's Ways of Knowing: The Development of Self, Voice, and Mind. Hypatia 3 (2):177-179.
  20. Macalester Bell (2005). A Woman's Scorn: Toward a Feminist Defense of Contempt as a Moral Emotion. Hypatia 20 (4):80-93.
  21. Macalester Bell (2000). A Woman's Scorn: Toward a Feminist Defense of Contempt as a Moral Emotion. Hypatia 20 (4):80-93.
  22. Seyla Benhabib (ed.) (1995). Feminist Contentions: A Philosophical Exchange. Routledge.
    This unique volume presents a debate between four of the top feminist theorists in the US today, discussing the key questions facing contemporary feminist theory, responding to each other, and distinguishing their views from others.
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  23. Paul Benson (2011). Symposia on Gender, Race and Philosophy. Hypatia 24 (4):26-49.
  24. Paul Benson (2007). Feminism and the A-Word: Power and Community in the University. Hypatia 22 (4):223-229.
  25. Paul Benson (1990). Feminist Second Thoughts About Free Agency. Hypatia 5 (3):47-64.
  26. Sandrine Bergès (2016). A Republican Housewife: Marie‐Jeanne Phlipon Roland on Women's Political Role. Hypatia 31 (1):107-122.
    In this paper I look at the philosophical struggles of one eighteenth-century woman writer to reconcile a desire and obvious capacity to participate in the creation of republican ideals and their applications on the one hand, and on the other a deeply held belief that women's role in a republic is confined to the domestic realm. I argue that Marie-Jeanne Phlipon Roland's philosophical writings—three unpublished essays, published and unpublished letters, as well as parts of her memoirs—suggest that even though she (...)
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  27. Debra Bergoffen (2003). February 22, 2001: Toward a Politics of the Vulnerable Body. Hypatia 18 (1):116-134.
  28. Debra B. Bergoffen (2008). The Just War Tradition: Translating the Ethics of Human Dignity Into Political Practices. Hypatia 23 (2):72-94.
  29. Debra B. Bergoffen (1999). Marriage, Autonomy, and the Feminine Protest. Hypatia 14 (4):18-35.
  30. Susan E. Bernick (1992). Philosophy and Feminism: The Case of Susan Bordo. Hypatia 7 (3):188 - 196.
    In this paper I lay out what I take to be the crucial insights in Susan Bordo's "Feminist Skepticism and the 'Maleness' of Philosophy" and point out some additional difficulties with the skeptical position. I call attention to an ambiguity in the nature or content of the "maleness" of philosophy that Bordo identifies. Finally, I point out that, unlike some feminist skeptics, Bordo never loses sight in her work of women's lived experiences.
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  31. Susan E. Bernick (1992). The Logic of the Development of Feminism; or, Is MacKinnon to Feminism as Parmenides Is to Greek Philosophy? Hypatia 7 (1):1-15.
  32. Talia Mae Bettcher, Feminist Perspectives on Trans Issues. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  33. Talia Mae Bettcher (2007). Evil Deceivers and Make-Believers: On Transphobic Violence and the Politics of Illusion. Hypatia 22 (3):43-65.
  34. Talia Mae Bettcher & Ann Garry (2007). Call for Papers. Hypatia 22 (3):242-243.
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  35. Rosemary Betterton (2006). Promising Monsters: Pregnant Bodies, Artistic Subjectivity, and Maternal Imagination. Hypatia 21 (1):80-100.
  36. Emanuela Bianchi (ed.) (1999). Is Feminist Philosophy Philosophy? Northwestern University Press.
    Drawing attention to the vexed relationship between feminist theory and philosophy, Is Feminist Philosophy Philosophy? demonstrates the spectrum of significant work being done at this contested boundary. The volume offers clear statements by seventeen distinguished scholars as well as a full range of philosophical approaches; it also presents feminist philosophers in conversation both as feminists and as philosophers, making the book accessible to a wide audience. -/- Table of Contents -/- Opening plenary: Drucilla Cornell, Jacques Derrida, and Teresa Brennan — (...)
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  37. Janet Biehl (1992). Rethinking Ecofeminist Politics. Hypatia 7 (3):216-220.
  38. Carol Bigwood (1991). Renaturalizing the Body. Hypatia 6 (3):54-73.
  39. Jelisaveta Blagojević & Dušan Đorđević Mileusnić (eds.) (2002). Selected Papers: Anniversary Issue. Belgrade Women's Studies Center.
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  40. Megan Boler (2002). Feeling Power: Emotions and Education. Hypatia 17 (1):205-209.
  41. Susan Bordo (2004). Feminist Interpretations of Descartes. Hypatia 19 (2):190-194.
  42. Susan Bordo (1992). “Maleness” Revisited. Hypatia 7 (3):197-207.
  43. Guy Bouchard (1994). DUMAIS, Monique, Diversité des utilisations féministes du concept «expériences des femmes» en sciences religieusesDUMAIS, Monique, Diversité des utilisations féministes du concept «expériences des femmes» en sciences religieuses. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 50 (3):660-662.
    Cet bref ouvrage propose une typologie des tendances de la théologie féministe en relation avec la notion d'expérience des femmes. Il peut inciter son lectorat à approfondir l'une ou l'autre des dix tendances répertoriées, et la pensée de l'une ou l'autre des représentantes de ces tendances. Mais il est difficile de comprendre la décision de s'en tenir aux "aspects positifs", dans le mesure où le féminisme est difficilement concevable sans sa dimension critique. Et, au lieu de répartir les tendances en (...)
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  44. Guy Bouchard (1991). Typologie des tendances théoriques du féminisme contemporain. Philosophiques 18 (1):119-167.
    L'étude des rapports entre féminisme et philosophie politique présuppose une classification des principales tendances du féminisme contemporain. l'article présente d'abord la typologie proposée par Alison Jaggar et indique les problèmes qu'elle pose. Il examine ensuite un ensemble de textes consacrés, expressément ou non, à la taxonomie de ces tendances, pour dégager une grille d'interprétation permettant de les rassembler dans un même cadre théorique explicitant les enjeux qu'elles abordent,mais aussi ceux qui sont ignorés.
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  45. Guy Bouchard (1989). L'hétéropolitique féministe. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 45 (1):95-120.
    Le modèle hétéropolitique comporte d'abord un moment discursif où le thème de la société idéalisée se présente soit dans une fiction (utopie) soit dans un texte non fictif (para-utopie); celle-ci peut-être élaborée en détails ou rester nucléaire, selon un mode négatif (facteurs à proscrire) ou positif (changements souhaités). Si le moment discursif paraît prometteur, il peut être repris dans un relais idéologique collectif et, éventuellement, aboutir à une implantation historique. La seconde partie de l'article illustre le modèle hétéropolitique d'une part (...)
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  46. Guy Bouchard (1987). La métaphore heuristique de l'esclavage dans les textes féministes. Philosophiques 14 (1):112-144.
    Associant théorie de la métaphore et conception hétéropolitique de l'utopie, cet article montre comment la métaphore de l'esclavage, dans les textes féministes, constitue un instrument heuristique nous incitant à redéfinir à la fois nos sociétés et nos théories.
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  47. Susan J. Brison (2006). Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction. Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
  48. Susan J. Brison (2001). Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction. Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
  49. Barbara Brook, Gail Weiss, Honi Fern Haber, Jane Arthurs & Jean Grimshaw (2004). Feminist Perspectives on the Body. Hypatia 19 (2):160-169.
  50. Belinda Brooks-Grodon (2002). Suzanne M. Zeedyk, and Fiona E. Raitt, The Implicit Relation of Psychology and Law: Women and Syndrome Evidence. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 10 (2):195-197.
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