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  1. Berit Åberg (2008). Explanations of Internal Sex Segregation in a Male Dominated Profession : The Police Force. In Anna G. Jónasdóttir & Kathleen B. Jones (eds.), The Political Interests of Gender Revisited: Redoing Theory and Research with a Feminist Face. United Nations University Press
  2. Mitchell Aboulafia (1993). Was George Herbert Mead a Feminist? Hypatia 8 (2):145 - 158.
    George Herbert Mead was a dedicated progressive and internationalist who strove to realize his political convictions through participation in numerous civic organizations in Chicago. These convictions informed and were informed by his approach to philosophy. This article addresses the bonds between Mead's philosophy, social psychology, and his support of women's rights through an analysis of a letter he wrote to his daughter-in-law regarding her plans for a career.
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  3. Brooke Ackerly, Alison Ainley, Linda Alcoff, Ellen Armour, Stella Gonzalez Arnal, Margaret Atherton, Amy Baehr, Bat-Ami Bar On, Robert Bernasconi & Carol Bigwood (forthcoming). Thanks to Reviewers 2006. Hypatia.
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  4. Alia Al-Saji (2010). Bodies and Sensings: On the Uses of Husserlian Phenomenology for Feminist Theory. Continental Philosophy Review 43 (1):13-37.
    What does Husserlian phenomenology have to offer feminist theory? More specifically, can we find resources within Husserl’s account of the living body ( Leib ) for the critical feminist project of rethinking embodiment beyond the dichotomies not only of mind/body but also of subject/object and activity/passivity? This essay begins by explicating the reasons for feminist hesitation with respect to Husserlian phenomenology. I then explore the resources that Husserl’s phenomenology of touch and his account of sensings hold for feminist theory. My (...)
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  5. Julia Annas (1976). Plato's "Republic" and Feminism. Philosophy 51 (197):307 - 321.
    Not many philosophers have dealt seriously with the problems of women's rights and status, and those that have, have unfortunately often been on the wrong side. In fact Plato and Mill are the only great philosophers who can plausibly be called feminists. But there has been surprisingly little serious effort made to analyse their arguments; perhaps because it has seemed like going over ground already won.
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  6. Anna Antonopoulos (1991). The Space That Claws and Knaws: Topoi of a Critical Discourse on 'Home'. Dissertation, Concordia University (Canada)
    With the rise of academic interest in objects of inquiry such as 'space', 'the family', 'woman', and 'the child', the discursive circulation of 'home' has seen an equal boom in the production and reproduction of academic texts. However, while the theoretical autonomy of such related concepts as gender, the family, and the household has been challenged, the 'home' as that space within which gendered subjectivity, the family, and the household unfold, remains a kind of unitary vat, an undifferentiated container of (...)
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  7. Louise Antony & Ann E. Cudd (2012). The Mentoring Project. Hypatia 27 (2):461-468.
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  8. Thomas Attig (1976). "Why Are You, a Man, Teaching This Course on the Philosophy of Feminism?". Metaphilosophy 7 (2):155–166.
  9. Carol Bacchi (2012). Introducing the 'What's the Problem Represented to Be?' Approach. In Angelique Bletsas & Chris Beasley (eds.), Engaging with Carol Bacchi: Strategic Interventions and Exchanges. University of Adelaide Press
  10. Alison Bailey & Jacquelyn N. Zita (2007). The Reproduction of Whiteness: Race and the Regulation of the Gendered Body. Hypatia 22 (2):vii-xv.
    Historically critical reflection on whiteness in the United States has been a long-standing practice in slave folklore and in Mexican resistance to colonialism, Asian American struggles against exploitation and containment, and Native American stories of contact with European colonizers. Drawing from this legacy and from the disturbing silence on "whiteness" in postsecondary institutions, critical whiteness scholarship has emerged in the past two decades in U.S. academies in a variety of disciplines. A small number of philosophers, critical race theorists, postcolonial theorists, (...)
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  11. Olive Banks (1985). The Biographical Dictionary of British Feminists.
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  12. Sandra Lee Bartky, Marilyn Friedman, William Harper, Alison M. Jaggar, Richard H. Miller, Abigail L. Rosenthal, Naomi Scheman, Nancy Tuana, Steven Yates, Christina Sommers, Philip E. Devine, Harry Deutsch, Michael Kelly & Charles L. Reid (1992). Letters to the Editor. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 65 (7):55 - 90.
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  13. Michelle Bastian (2009). Inventing Nature: Re-Writing Time and Agency in a More-Than-Human World. Australian Humanities Review 47:99-116.
    This paper is a response to Val Plumwoods call for writers to engage in ‘the struggle to think differently’. Specifically, she calls writers to engage in the task of opening up an experience of nature as powerful and as possessing agency. I argue that a critical component of opening up who or what can be understood as possessing agency involves challenging the conception of time as linear, externalised and absolute, particularly in as much as it has guided Western conceptions of (...)
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  14. Seyla Benhabib (ed.) (1995). Feminist Contentions: A Philosophical Exchange. Routledge.
    This unique volume presents a debate between four of the top feminist theorists in the US today, discussing the key questions facing contemporary feminist theory, responding to each other, and distinguishing their views from others.
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  15. Paul Benson (2011). Symposia on Gender, Race and Philosophy. Hypatia 24 (4):26-49.
  16. Susan E. Bernick (1992). Philosophy and Feminism: The Case of Susan Bordo. Hypatia 7 (3):188 - 196.
    In this paper I lay out what I take to be the crucial insights in Susan Bordo's "Feminist Skepticism and the 'Maleness' of Philosophy" and point out some additional difficulties with the skeptical position. I call attention to an ambiguity in the nature or content of the "maleness" of philosophy that Bordo identifies. Finally, I point out that, unlike some feminist skeptics, Bordo never loses sight in her work of women's lived experiences.
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  17. Talia Mae Bettcher, Feminist Perspectives on Trans Issues. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  18. Talia Mae Bettcher & Ann Garry (2007). Call for Papers. Hypatia 22 (3):242-243.
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  19. Emanuela Bianchi (ed.) (1999). Is Feminist Philosophy Philosophy? Northwestern University Press.
    Drawing attention to the vexed relationship between feminist theory and philosophy, Is Feminist Philosophy Philosophy? demonstrates the spectrum of significant work being done at this contested boundary. The volume offers clear statements by seventeen distinguished scholars as well as a full range of philosophical approaches; it also presents feminist philosophers in conversation both as feminists and as philosophers, making the book accessible to a wide audience. -/- Table of Contents -/- Opening plenary: Drucilla Cornell, Jacques Derrida, and Teresa Brennan — (...)
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  20. Jelisaveta Blagojević & Dušan Đorđević Mileusnić (eds.) (2002). Selected Papers: Anniversary Issue. Belgrade Women's Studies Center.
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  21. Guy Bouchard (1994). DUMAIS, Monique, Diversité des utilisations féministes du concept «expériences des femmes» en sciences religieusesDUMAIS, Monique, Diversité des utilisations féministes du concept «expériences des femmes» en sciences religieuses. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 50 (3):660-662.
    Cet bref ouvrage propose une typologie des tendances de la théologie féministe en relation avec la notion d'expérience des femmes. Il peut inciter son lectorat à approfondir l'une ou l'autre des dix tendances répertoriées, et la pensée de l'une ou l'autre des représentantes de ces tendances. Mais il est difficile de comprendre la décision de s'en tenir aux "aspects positifs", dans le mesure où le féminisme est difficilement concevable sans sa dimension critique. Et, au lieu de répartir les tendances en (...)
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  22. Guy Bouchard (1991). Typologie des tendances théoriques du féminisme contemporain. Philosophiques 18 (1):119-167.
    L'étude des rapports entre féminisme et philosophie politique présuppose une classification des principales tendances du féminisme contemporain. l'article présente d'abord la typologie proposée par Alison Jaggar et indique les problèmes qu'elle pose. Il examine ensuite un ensemble de textes consacrés, expressément ou non, à la taxonomie de ces tendances, pour dégager une grille d'interprétation permettant de les rassembler dans un même cadre théorique explicitant les enjeux qu'elles abordent,mais aussi ceux qui sont ignorés.
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  23. Guy Bouchard (1989). L'hétéropolitique féministe. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 45 (1):95-120.
    Le modèle hétéropolitique comporte d'abord un moment discursif où le thème de la société idéalisée se présente soit dans une fiction (utopie) soit dans un texte non fictif (para-utopie); celle-ci peut-être élaborée en détails ou rester nucléaire, selon un mode négatif (facteurs à proscrire) ou positif (changements souhaités). Si le moment discursif paraît prometteur, il peut être repris dans un relais idéologique collectif et, éventuellement, aboutir à une implantation historique. La seconde partie de l'article illustre le modèle hétéropolitique d'une part (...)
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  24. Guy Bouchard (1987). La métaphore heuristique de l'esclavage dans les textes féministes. Philosophiques 14 (1):112-144.
    Associant théorie de la métaphore et conception hétéropolitique de l'utopie, cet article montre comment la métaphore de l'esclavage, dans les textes féministes, constitue un instrument heuristique nous incitant à redéfinir à la fois nos sociétés et nos théories.
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  25. Cheshire Calhoun (2009). The Undergraduate Pipeline Problem. Hypatia 24 (2):216 - 223.
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  26. Joan Callahan (2010). Greetings From an Unlikely Filmmaker. Hypatia 25 (1):213 - 216.
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  27. Joan Callahan (1996). Symposium: A Roundtable on Feminism and Philosophy in the Mid-1990s: Taking Stock: Introduction. Metaphilosophy 27 (1-2):184-188.
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  28. Lisa Campo-Engelstein (2008). Goodbye Hypatia, My Friend. Hypatia 23 (3):pp. 233-235.
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  29. Claudia Card (2000). Drucilla Cornell, At the Heart of Freedom: Feminism, Sex, and Equality:At the Heart of Freedom: Feminism, Sex, and Equality. Ethics 110 (3):607-609.
  30. Claudia Card (1996). Feminism and Philosophy in the Mid-Nineties: Taking Stock. Metaphilosophy 27 (1-2):193-196.
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  31. Patricia Ticineto Clough (1994). Feminist Thought: Desire, Power, and Academic Discourse. Blackwell.
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  32. Sharyn Clough (2004). Book Review: Virginia Valian. Why so Slow? The Advancement of Women. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia 19 (2):150-151.
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  33. Andrew Cohen (2003). Book Review: Mimi Reisel Gladstein and Chris Matthew Sciabarra. Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (3):226-229.
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  34. Catherine Constable (2000). Provocations. Hypatia 15 (2):94-99.
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  35. Drucilla Cornell (2005). The Solace of Resonance. Hypatia 20 (2):215-222.
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  36. Alice Crary (2012). What is Posthumanism? By Cary Wolfe. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2010. Hypatia 27 (3):678-685.
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  37. Bridget J. Crawford, The Third Wave's Break From Feminism.
    Janet Halley proves that third-wave feminism is wrong - wrongly described, that is. Young feminists in the United States tout a "third wave" of feminism that is hip, ironic and playful - the supposed opposite of the dour and strident "second wave" of 1970's feminism. Goodbye to frumpy sandals; hello sexy fishnets, according to third-wave feminism. Initially young women themselves (and now writers and scholars) pervasive wave metaphor conveys the sense that differences within feminism are generational. Youth crashes against (and (...)
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  38. Jean Curthoys (1997). Feminist Amnesia: The Wake of Women's Liberation. Routledge.
    Feminist Amnesia is an important challenge to contemporary academic feminism. Jean Curthoys argues that the intellectual decline of university arts education and the loss of a deep moral commitment in feminism are related phenomena. The contradiction set up by the radical ideas of the 1960s, and institutionalised life of many of its protagonists in the academy, has produced a special kind of intellectual distortion. This book criticizes current trends in feminist theory from the perspective of forgotten and allegedly outdated feminist (...)
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  39. Nancy Daukas (2011). Altogether Now: A Virtue-Theoretic Approach to Pluralism in Feminist Epistemology In. In Heidi Grasswick (ed.), Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science: Power in Knowledge.
    In this paper I develop and support a feminist virtue epistemology and bring it into conversation with feminist contextual empiricism and feminist standpoint theory. The virtue theory I develop is centered on the virtue of epistemic trustworthiness, which foregrounds the social/political character of knowledge practices and products, and the differences between epistemic agencies that perpetuate, on the one hand, and displace, on the other hand, normative patterns of unjust epistemic discrimination. I argue that my view answers important questions regarding (...)
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  40. Hilary E. Davis (1994). Pleasure, Pain, and Ethical Responsibility: A Felt-Situated Reading of Menace II Society. In Philosophy of Education.
    This paper posits a feminist aesthetic of reading, ‘re-captivation,’ which accounts for both the reader's pleasure and his/her ethical responsibility. Re-captivation is distinguished by its introspective and ethical characteristics; it is a pleasure informed by the pain of misrecognition, i.e. acknowledgement of one's own complicity in systems of oppression. After a brief explanation of re-captivation, this paper describes my experience viewing the film Menace II Society. Using my paths of identification and emotional response to this film as my data, I (...)
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  41. Jane Duran (2002). Wittgenstein, Feminism and Theory. Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (3):321-336.
    An attempt is made to try to delineate the common ground of feminist concerns and the work of Wittgenstein by alluding to several areas of theory - among them are the orality-literacy distinction, the notion of the universal, and the realm of particulars. I cite portions of both the Tractatus and the Investigations, and utilize the work of commentators such as Anscombe, Fogelin and Genova. The broader argument is that Wittgenstein's turn away from a kind of logical atomism is a (...)
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  42. Susan Dwyer (1996). Who's Afraid of Feminism? Dialogue 35 (02):327-.
    Philosopher Christina Hoff Sommers's target in Who Stole Feminism? How Women Have Betrayed Women is “gender feminism.” Her aim is to convince us that gender feminists are anti-intellectual opportunists who deliberately spread lies about the incidence of date rape , domestic battery and about the general state of male-female relations in America , thereby generating fear and resentment of men , all so that they may secure vast amounts of government funding and high-paying jobs in the academy . Because gender (...)
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  43. Therese Boos Dykeman (2004). The Philosophy of Halfness and the Philosophy of Duality: Julia Ward Howe and Ednah Dow Cheney. Hypatia 19 (2):17-34.
    : Julia Ward (1819-1910) and Ednah Dow Littlehale (1824-1904), lifelong friends, wrote and lectured on many of the same issues, traveled across the country to lend support to causes, and taught together at the Concord School of Philosophy. Despite their close association and mutual efforts on similar issues, I argue that their philosophical principles were essentially different, in particular their approaches to an understanding of God, society, the sexes, art, and science.
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  44. Therese Boos Dykeman (ed.) (1999). The Neglected Canon: Nine Women Philosophers: First to the Twentieth Century. Kluwer Academic.
    The outstanding points of The Neglected Canon are that it provides a multicultural anthology of women philosophers: Chinese, European, North and Central American, that it provides a history of women philosophers through selected works from the first century to the beginning of the twentieth century, and that it provides unusual comprehensiveness in its bibliographies, biographies, and introductions to the works. In these three points it offers a more complete text than any yet on the market in this field. Designed for (...)
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  45. Gertrude Ezorsky (1979). Correspondence. Philosophy and Public Affairs 8 (3):296-302.
  46. Nadine Faulkner (2005). Theorizing Backlash: Philosophical Reflections on the Resistance to Feminism. Dialogue 44 (1):201-204.
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  47. Cordelia Fine (2008). Will Working Mothers' Brains Explode? The Popular New Genre of Neurosexism. Neuroethics 1 (1):69-72.
    A number of recent popular books about gender differences have drawn on the neuroscientific literature to support the claim that certain psychological differences between the sexes are ‘hard-wired’. This article highlights some of the ethical implications that arise from both factual and conceptual errors propagated by such books.
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  48. Clara Fischer (2010). Review of 'Engels Revisited: Feminist Essays' (by Sayers Et Al.). [REVIEW] Marx and Philosophy Review of Books.
    Forming part of the Routledge Revivals programme, this book, originally published in 1987 to commemorate the centenary of Engels’ The Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State, has been reissued in 2010. As such, it gives us an insight into the lasting importance of Engels’ influential work on ‘the woman question’ on the one hand, while providing us with the complex and sophisticated late 1980s feminist analyses of said work, on the other. The articles in this edited volume (...)
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  49. Catherine Villanueva Gardner (2000). Rediscovering Women Philosophers: Philosophical Genre and the Boundaries of Philosophy. Westview.
    This book examines the philosophical foremothers of women’s philosophy and explores what their work may have to offer modern theorizing in feminist ethics. Through such writers as Catharine Macaulay, Mary Wollstonecraft, and George Eliot, Gardner interprets a varied selection of moral philosophers in an attempt both to contribute to our understanding of their work, and perhaps even to encourage other philosophers to interpretive work of their own. She also looks into the reasons such forms as novels, letters, and poetry have (...)
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  50. Evelien Geerts, An Analysis of Susan Moller Okin’s Problematic Approach to Multiculturalism. A Feminist Comprehensive Liberalism Gone Wrong.
    In this paper, I looked into the debate between feminism and multiculturalism via the works of Susan Moller Okin, Will Kymlicka and Martha C. Nussbaum. After analyzing Susan Okin's position in "Is Multiculturalism Bad For Women?", I tried to locate Okin's problematic stance towards multiculturalism in her specific form of feminist comprehensive liberalism, whilst defending Nussbaum's less problematic version of political liberalism.
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